Question about Baritone Notation

UkeStuff

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Hello, everyone!

I'm working on a chord melody project for the Holidays (some Christmas carols) and plan to make them available for GCEA and DGBE. I'll keep the tablature the same, but I always show traditional notation with the tablature, which I always appreciate in the work of others.

I have a question about notation for Baritone, however. In the Guitar world, Guitar notation (actual music) is shown an octave higher than the instrument sounds (it avoids the ledger lines under the staff). Does Baritone follow the same convention, or does it also get transposed up an octave?

As GCEA (mainly, unless you are playing in Low G) falls mainly on the staff, it is shown at pitch.

Thanks in advance for your thoughts. There may not be a standard solution, either (it is possible that some people transpose Baritone and others leave it at pitch), and if so, I'm interested to hear what the majority would do.
 

Arcy

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All of the baritone staves I’ve seen are notated the same a guitar so they centre on the treble clef.

Usually the clef symbol is left bare. Occasionally it has an 8 under it to indicate playing an octave down.
 

wqking

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Yes, the sheet music for Baritone is one octave higher, same as guitar. So the TAB tuning is one octave higher too, to correspond to the sheet music.
 

UkeStuff

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Yes, the sheet music for Baritone is one octave higher, same as guitar. So the TAB tuning is one octave higher too, to correspond to the sheet music.
Well. the tab is simply the tab, telling what fret to play on each string. That isn't going to change. It's the traditional music notation that can be (should be?) an octave higher.
 

wqking

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Well. the tab is simply the tab, telling what fret to play on each string. That isn't going to change. It's the traditional music notation that can be (should be?) an octave higher.
I use MuseScore to make scores. Each string on the TAB must have a pitch if the TAB is linked to the main sheet. If the string is not one octave higher, all notes on the TAB will be out of range.
Seems you are using a better software that you don't need to care about the pitch on the strings.
 

UkeStuff

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I use MuseScore to make scores. Each string on the TAB must have a pitch if the TAB is linked to the main sheet. If the string is not one octave higher, all notes on the TAB will be out of range.
Seems you are using a better software that you don't need to care about the pitch on the strings.
I actually found a setting in Notion that just flips the notation up an octave while retaining the tabs. I would bet that MuseScore would have something similar; though I don’t use MuseScore for two reasons. First, it enters notes like Sibelius and Dorico (every measure is already filled with rests that you have to change to notes along the way…unlike Finale and Notion which start empty), and second, it doesn’t run on iPad, and I do almost all my ukulele entry on the ukulele fretboard on Notion on iPad.