Router Table Queries

fromthee2me

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Hi everyone,

I bought a 2nd hand home made router table with a cheap Makita router mounted on a piece of perspex in the centre. The problem is adjusting the height of the cutter, which can be done, but I have to remove the fence everytime and repeat the whole set up procedure, which is a pain in the rectum. I have been googling these american Rockler systems, but I wonder if there are any tips for a beginner to make the router easier for small adjustments and less tedious?

The other problem that I have is that I need a 2nd person to hold down the switch of the router (when routing) as there is no switch lock on the Makita. If I interupt the power chord with a switch the Makita becomes less portable. I probably have to compromise?

Presently I'm building cajons for friends.
 

Beau Hannam Ukuleles

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I've seen an on/off foot switch/pedal from harbour frieght (for $15-$20) which would take care of needing a second person and half of your rectal problems.

Those allen key height adjusters router insert thingys are great but pricey.

Depending on how many different cuts you make, you might be better off buying/making a new one and have two set router tables from which to work.
 

fromthee2me

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BHU, tnx for your reply.

I've been looking at the GMF 1600 CE Professional Twin Base Router and it has many views on YT, so I do not even know as this is an older model 2012 ?

The part that I liked was that you can screw/fit this unit in a routing table, and lower or heighten it.

with some sort of a key. The table and the fence are more easily to make in my case (limited skills)

Then there is the MRC 23EVS and I do not know yet what the differences are between these models?

The re-search continues.
 

Chris_H

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If it is a full size plunge router on the table, either a screw clamp, like the type used for some of the fox type benders, or a screw jack, or hydraulic bottle jack can be used under the router/ built into the table to aid in a more precision lift. I have seen it, sorry for the poor description. It does work, but nowhere near as well as a proper router lift.

The Jess-em lift, Woodpecker lift, I think Rockler and others make them too, those are nice. I have one and would buy one again if I did not.
 

droze

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Can't you just use a zip tie to hold the switch in? Then you could clip it if you want to use the router off of the base. It would be easy to build a switch for it from parts at any hardware store, using a double wide electrical box, a switch, and a electrical receptacle, but if you can a foot controlled switch from Harbour Freight $20, that sounds like a much better option.

If you had the tools and the wherewithal, you could build a router lift. Google DIY router lift and you will see lots of examples. If you have the cash, I think I would just buy a router that can be adjusted from above the table.
270806.jpg
 

fromthee2me

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Droze, I saw that youtube, of which you replied with the picture.....me thinks, and I've downloaded that YT on the home made router lift(Steve Ramsey). But the same author also made a YT of the table/cabinet he'd be mounting that unit into. Ziptie was tried but did not hold. It slid off everytime. The Bosch GMF 1600 seems to be the one with "from the top" height adjustments with a long "key" ....
 

droze

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If zip ties don't work, would a hose clamp? If it is slipping, would using a piece of rubber or a rubber band between the switch and the zip tie or hose clamp stop it from slipping? Without seeing the router, it hard to visualize what would work.

I think all of the major router manufacturers have at least one model that can be adjusted from the top of a router table. I had posted this link in a previous thread when discussing the best router for a router table: http://www.finewoodworking.com/media/RouterTables.pdf. I shows several routers that can be adjusted from the top of a router table.

If you have a plunge router, Chris H's suggestion of using a car jack would be very simple to try. With the right jack, I assume you could adjust the height reasonably accurately. I could be wrong, but I think this would require a plunge router -- otherwise I don't know how you would fix the base to the table to keep the router steady.
 

fromthee2me

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Good Morning Droze,

Thank you for that PDF you dug out of your archives. I will have a look at Triton, as that one came out of the test best. Replying to your suggestion of a hoseclamp I have to admit that I have not tried that. The Bosch has a height adjustment/travel of 16mm which is within range of the small adjustments I usually have to make. The changing of bits is less important at this stage, as I prepare the boards in batches as determined by type of passes I have make.
The 1600 model allows one to clip out the motor, and bring it to a work friendly surface that does not require hands and knees work for which I am becoming too old ;-) I am amazed how cheap these routers are . Here in South Africa they cost twice as much.
 

fromthee2me

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Update: Have orderd the Triton. Quite a lot cheaper. Thanks for input everybody.
 

rogersmith26

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Agree

Update: Have orderd the Triton. Quite a lot cheaper. Thanks for input everybody.

Same buddy, i also recently purchased one Triton. And it works well for me. Thankful i got recommendation of it from one of the forum.

Triton tra001 has quite a bit of the necessary and much-prized bells and whistles. It is versatile yet also is able to start without kickback and does not sacrifice work strength. You can expect plenty of high-quality work from this design! It sells as its own standalone device. The addition of air vents is definitely a great touch for Triton tra001.

It has pros like:-

Has an automatic spindle lock to easily secure it in place. You will only need one wrench for securing the collet.

Features a full soft start ability, preventing kickback and excessive sudden noise. [Check more]

But it has only one problem It has no dedicated vacuum ports. Features side air vents for reduced dust intake instead, requiring old-fashioned vacuum cleaning by hand.

But anyways it is great product.
 

jamesjolly

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On the off chance that zip ties don't work, could a hose brace? On the off chance that it is slipping, would utilizing a piece of elastic or an elastic band between the switch and the zip tie or hose brace prevent it from slipping? Without seeing the switch, it difficult to imagine what might work.

I think about the significant switch makers have at any rate one model that can be changed from the highest point of a switch table. I had posted this connection in a past string while talking about the best switch for a router table: I shows a few switches that can be changed from the highest point of a switch table.

On the off chance that you have a dive switch, Chris H's idea of utilizing a vehicle jack would be easy to attempt. With the right jack, I expect you could change the tallness sensibly precisely. I could not be right, however I figure this would require a dive switch - else I don't have the foggiest idea how you would fix the base to the table to keep the switch consistent.
 

Timbuck

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Low cost router tables are pain to adjust...but I only use 2 .. I use mine for a few jobs..one for trimming the edge of the tops and backs with a trim router cutter bearing at the top, and the other table has the bearing at the bottom for trimming neck profiles, and fretboards, these router cutters are all pre-set to hight and all the jigs are made to fit them without any other adjustments needed.
I considered buying the posh set up with top adjustment because I fell in love with it :drool:then decided I do not need it.
 
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azonia2

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I am buying a router and wanting to build a router table for it as it seems pretty basic. The one thing I question is why get a plate for mounting the router, why not mount it directly to an MDF? best router for table mounting If both are very flat I guess I don't see a reason, unless you need to have the plate thin or something?
I have some old cabinets from a kitchen remodel I did and I am thinking of putting the router in between two smaller cabinets.
 
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Uke-alot

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Having a thin plate is an advantage in terms of allowing greater cutting heght (the bit has to extend through the table material, so thinner material is better). Once in a while, this turns out to be a significant concern depending on the bit youre using and cut you're trying to make. If you need a thin table or plate due to cutting height concerns., thinning the MDF from the bottom of the table would be possible. But thin MDF is not ideal from a strength or stiffness perspective. A plate mounting system also makes it pretty quick and easy to get the whole router, plate and all, out of the table without unbolting anything.

My homemade router table is made out of thick aluminum sheet with formica glued to it. There's no mounting plate; the router base is bolted directly to the table. So it's essentially like what you're talking about except it doesn't have the issue with limited cutting height due to a thick table.

If you have an existing flat countertop you would like to reuse, you can route an opening in the countertop to take a router mounting plate. I think some plates come with templates for that purpose.