sandpaper to use for a bone saddle.

johnson430

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I have a bone saddle blank that was sent by HMS to me as a replacement for another saddle that was lowered on a Pono MTD.

What are the grades of sandpaper I will need to properly sand and shape the saddle?
I will be using the saddle from my other Pono tenor as a template to shape the blank to a proper size and height.
Thanks for any help.
Johnson
 

spongeuke

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I use a metal file to maintain a perfectly flat surface and a file card handy to keep it cutting nice. The resultant product doesn't need much polishing if any to look good.
 

johnson430

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Thanks you two.
I will have to shape the whole piece.

In the photo:
Top is the blank.
Middle is the saddle from my Pono MGT
Bottom is the lowered saddle from the Pono MTD

DSC_0423.jpg
 

Booli

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Thanks you two.
I will have to shape the whole piece.

In the photo:
Top is the blank.
Middle is the saddle from my Pono MGT
Bottom is the lowered saddle from the Pono MTD

View attachment 85308


I'm no luthier, but I've done this half a dozen or so times myself, with bone, micarta and ebony.

The video WhenDogsSing linked above is great and gives a good overview of the process, and for uke vs. guitar, everything is pretty much the same, just smaller.

Judging from the photo, it seems like you have to take off between 3-5mm of bone from the bottom. If it were me, after I made the marking line, I'd start with some 50 or 75 grit aluminum oxide sandpaper, which is very coarse, and will make fast work of removing that material. Once I got close to the line, I'd move up to 200 grit sandpaper, and while it will take more strokes to remove material, you will have more control and precision in getting to your proper measurement.

Also, to note, you might want to wear a dust mask over your nose and mouth as bone dust can be really nasty if inhaled (don't ask, NOT doing that again), and also remember to go slow, and take measurements and check against your other saddle often as you get closer to your marked lines, otherwise if you go too far, you will need to shim the saddle, or have to start over again with a new bone blank.

Good luck! :)
 

johnson430

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I'm no luthier, but I've done this half a dozen or so times myself, with bone, micarta and ebony.

The video WhenDogsSing linked above is great and gives a good overview of the process, and for uke vs. guitar, everything is pretty much the same, just smaller.

Judging from the photo, it seems like you have to take off between 3-5mm of bone from the bottom. If it were me, after I made the marking line, I'd start with some 50 or 75 grit aluminum oxide sandpaper, which is very coarse, and will make fast work of removing that material. Once I got close to the line, I'd move up to 200 grit sandpaper, and while it will take more strokes to remove material, you will have more control and precision in getting to your proper measurement.

Also, to note, you might want to wear a dust mask over your nose and mouth as bone dust can be really nasty if inhaled (don't ask, NOT doing that again), and also remember to go slow, and take measurements and check against your other saddle often as you get closer to your marked lines, otherwise if you go too far, you will need to shim the saddle, or have to start over again with a new bone blank.

Good luck! :)

Great advice. It took some sanding but I worked it down. The MTD sounds great. I am so happy now, as the volume and response were greatly reduced by the lowering of the previous saddle.
Thanks again for the help.
I went 80, 150 and finished with 400 to smooth out the roughness.
Also, I used the MGT saddle as a guide but the MTD was thinner so I had to sand a bit off the edges as well.

Now I just need to convince my wife I need two ukes. =)