Season 496 - The Island

hendulele

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I hoped to do this one for joo’s season about animals and didn’t get it in.

Wendy (UkeCanToo) and I played this together ages ago when she was in the area for a conference. She seems to be doing great in Australia. Hope she drops in again!

 

Jim Yates

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My apologies for a thread drift.
What does the word "cover" mean to you? In the fifties and/or sixties, there was a company called K-Tel that put out records of current pop songs played by some great studio musicians who tried to copy every lick and nuance of the original artists, including mistakes. These were called "covers". There were also cover artists who performed as closely as possible to the performers who had the hits.
Performers like Billie Holiday, Frank Sinatra, Elvis Presley. . . were not called cover artists even though they did not write most of their music. They did perform it in their own very creative ways.

Today, the words cover and cover artist are often used in a pejorative way to describe artists who do not compose their own music.
If I sing House Of The Rising Sun, who am I covering? If someone sings The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face, who are they covering? If someone sings I Did It My Way, who are they covering? How about Skip To My Lou?

I'd rather lose the word cover altogether and instead of, "Here's my cover of. . ." say "Here's my version of. . ." or "Here's the way I play/sing. . ."

What does the word "cover" mean to you?

(I always try to give credit to the composer of the song and I'm pleased to see that this is common practice among Seasonistas.)
 
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pabrizzer

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My apologies for a thread drift.
What does the word "cover" mean to you? In the fifties and/or sixties, there was a company called K-Tel that put out records of current pop songs played by some great studio musicians who tried to copy every lick and nuance of the original artists, including mistakes. These were called "covers". There were also cover artists who performed as closely as possible to the performers who had the hits.
Performers like Billie Holiday, Frank Sinatra, Elvis Presley. . . were not called cover artists even though they did not write most of their music. They did perform it in their own very creative ways.

Today, the words cover and cover artist are often used in a pejorative way to describe artists who do not compose their own music.
If I sing House Of The Rising Sun, who am I covering? If someone sings The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face, who are they covering? If someone sings I Did It My Way, who are they covering? How about Skip To My Lou?

I'd rather lose the word cover altogether and instead of, "Here's my cover of. . ." say "Here's my version of. . ." or "Here's the way I play/sing. . ."

What does the word "cover" mean to you?

(I always try to give credit to the composer of the song and I'm pleased to see that this is common practice among Seasonistas.)

oh you are playing the semantics game Jim
cover and version mean the same thing to me
means you're having a went at a song that ain't yours
i always try to credit the composer
 

Jim Yates

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oh you are playing the semantics game Jim
cover and version mean the same thing to me
means you're having a went at a song that ain't yours
i always try to credit the composer

In that case I really like Billie Holiday's cover of Strange Fruit (by Abel Meeropol). Frank Sinatra's cover of I Did It My Way (by Paul Anka) is pretty good too, as is Elvis's cover of Hound Dog (by Big Mama Thorton).

I like Ramblin' Jack's version of Don't Think Twice better that Bob Dylan's version.
 
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pabrizzer

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i guess redoing your own song would be more a version
meaning any performance of a song other than your own would be a cover or version
you'll have me consulting some dictionaries if you keep this up Jm....
 

lizbrinker

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I'll jump in. I like 'rendition'. :- ) Sorry for the distraction, Ryan. Do you have an opinion on this matter, sir? Additionally, would you like us to shut up and sing?

:- D Liz
 

pabrizzer

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I'll jump in. I like 'rendition'. :- ) Sorry for the distraction, Ryan. Do you have an opinion on this matter, sir? Additionally, would you like us to shut up and sing?

:- D Liz

yes - this is what happens when we don't have originals or covers or versions or renditions to listen to.......
 

RAB11

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Really I take Jim's point. I think there is a distinction to be made. For me there's a difference between piggy backing off another song's success to help springboard your own and paying tribute to a song by reimagining it in your own style.

It's all about the intent and how much of it has come from the artist themselves or their label/management imo.

I get that from Tin Pan Alley right up to the 60s probably the trend was more for there to be professional song writers just churning them out for the talented musicians to play but I think once the musicians writing their own stuff became the norm things changed for the better. And of course it still happens today but they're written often with an artist in mind rather than everyone jumping to be the first to play it.

But I don't think I'll ever get in a headspace where I'd be able to write songs en-masse like those guys (and a few guys here) just because my approach to songwriting makes them super personal and that's not an infinite well to draw from.

I think there's a right and a wrong way to play someone else's song and it boils down to your intentions.

And yes, please bring more songs.
 

mythinformed

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Any bands that do the pub and club circuit covering only other artists songs are known as 'cover bands' so It stands to reason that a cover Is just a reinterpretation of the original.
 
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pabrizzer

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words have meanings not motives
there is nothing exploitative in the meaning of the word cover
if sinatra and elvis aren't known as singer songwriters they were in fact cover artists
the distinction is indeed 'made' it is not in the literal meaning of the words
 

cazteclo

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Ahoy
I think I am half way through Beck's 'Mutation' album by doing this song.
 

Jim Yates

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Oh Susannah - Stephen Foster

Here's a chance to use a banjolele.
The changes here were inspired by James Taylor's version of this song, although they're probably not the very same chords as he used.
I bought the banjo uke for $12. It had a twisted neck and was not playable. I got luthier Dave Fox to build me a new neck, saving the Gumby headstock. The neck cost considerably more than $12.


I've been playing with this song and realise that, while I did it in C here, I like it better in A. I won't do another video of it, but if you'd like to try it, here you go:

Oh Susannah Steven Foster

I come from Alabama with my banjo on my knee,
I'm going to Louisiana, my true love for to see.
It rained all night the day I left, the weather it was dry
The sun so hot I froze to death, Susanna, don't you cry.

Oh! Susanna, Oh don't you cry for me,
For I come from Alabama with my banjo on my knee.

I had a dream the other night, when everything was still;
I thought I saw Susanna dear, a coming down the hill.
A buckwheat cake was in her mouth, a tear was in her eye,
Says I, I'm coming from the south, Susanna, don't you cry.

Oh! Susanna, Oh don't you cry for me,
For I come from Alabama with my banjo on my knee.

I soon will be in New Orleans, and then I'll look around,
And when I find Susanna, I'll fall upon the ground.
But if I do not find her, then I will surely die,
And when I'm dead and buried, Oh, Susanna, don't you cry.

Oh! Susanna, Oh don't you cry for me,
For I come from Alabama with my banjo on my knee.

Ukulele chords: A-2100 Bm7-2222 C#m7-4444 F#m7-2120 E7-1202 Bm6-1222
(inspired by James Taylor)

[:A / Bm7 / |C#m7 / F#m7 / |A / F#m7 / |Bm7 / E7 / |
|A / Bm7 / |C#m7 / F#m7 / |C#m7 Cm7 Bm7 Bb |A / / / :]

[Bm7 / / / |Bm6 / / / |A / F#m7 / |Bm7 / E7 / |
|A / Bm7 / |C#m7 / F#m7 / |C#m7 Cm7 Bm7 Bb |A / / / ]
 

kolibri

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Just plinking: Meie kaks (We Two, 1968) by Kustas Kikerpuu.
 

Jim Yates

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Right, after a busy couple of days I'm finally caught up and blown away with what everyone has brought.

We've had quite a few multitracks with different instruments come through which I love.

So for the last few days of the season I am hereby waving the ukulele requirement of the season. If you've been picking up a new instrument and working on that, bring it here, no uke required. Obviously if you still want to bring uke songs by all means please do.

Looking forward to what you come up with!

Well, no one else has taken Ryan up on this offer. I tried to adapt this next song to the ukulele, but haven't had much luck, so here's a guitar song.

The Talkin' Guitar Blues by Chris Bouchillon et al

Christopher Allen Bouchillon, billed as "The Talking Comedian of the South", is credited with creating the "talking blues" form. Many others have used this form to make up their own talking blues. I have recordings of Woody Guthrie, Bob Dylan, Ramblin' Jack, Tom Rush, Pete Seeger, Doc Watson. . . Bobby Bare had a hit (under the name Bill Parsons) with a song about learning to play the guitar called "The All American Boy" in 1958. Cisco Houston recorded a talking blues much earlier about learning to play the guitar. I took something from all of these people, but it's closest to Bobby Bare's and Cisco Houston's, although credit has to be given to Chris Bouchillon.

 

TCK

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Y’all know I take it pretty hard when one of my heroes leaves us…and man this has been a bad year with Toots Hibbert, Johnny Nash, Jerry Jeff Walker and Charlie Pride (and so many other fine people…so many)…so when I read this morning that we had lost Tom T. Hall yesterday…well…let’s just say a few of his songs have been played around here today. He is probably my first childhood musical memory because my dad loved “Old Dogs” the way I do. Anyway, we made it through Melissa feeling she was under-dressed for the occasion and managed to record our favorite Tom T. Hall song, “That’s How I Got to Memphis” for you, and for Tom T, who is likely telling a great story in heaven tonight.
 

hendulele

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Any bands that do the pub and club circuit covering only other artists songs are known as 'cover bands' so It stands to reason that a cover Is just a reinterpretation of the original.

Yeah, I think of a cover (mostly) as an attempt by someone to recreate another
 
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