Thinking of thinning the herd

PTOEguy

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I've been playing uke for a while and have bought a lot of ukuleles to try out different things (scales, electronics, banjos, resonators, etc.) and now I'm getting into tenor banjo and I think I need to reduce my ukulele footprint for the good of my storage space (and marriage). Here's what I've currently got:

Blackbird Clara w/pickup (my main player - gets used frequently)
Godin Multi-uke (for playing plugged in - love the neck on this one)
Concert Flea - used to be my camping uke (friction tuners are finicky in temp changes)
Flight TUS - current camping uke (so replaceable at about $50)
Pono MB - rarely gets played, particularly now that I have a tenor guitar
Gold Tone Little Gem - Love the sound, but always seems to have sharp fret ends in my dry climate.

If you had to narrow this collection down to 2 or 3 ukes, what would you do?
 

Teddy

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I've been playing uke for a while and have bought a lot of ukuleles to try out different things (scales, electronics, banjos, resonators, etc.) and now I'm getting into tenor banjo and I think I need to reduce my ukulele footprint for the good of my storage space (and marriage). Here's what I've currently got:

Blackbird Clara w/pickup (my main player - gets used frequently)
Godin Multi-uke (for playing plugged in - love the neck on this one)
Concert Flea - used to be my camping uke (friction tuners are finicky in temp changes)
Flight TUS - current camping uke (so replaceable at about $50)
Pono MB - rarely gets played, particularly now that I have a tenor guitar
Gold Tone Little Gem - Love the sound, but always seems to have sharp fret ends in my dry climate.

If you had to narrow this collection down to 2 or 3 ukes, what would you do?

Seems like the blackbird and Godin are the definite keepers. Might as well hold on to the Flight since it's so cheap, would be harder to sell for anything worth while with shipping rates the way they are.

So I'd say sell the Pono and Flea definitely and maybe the goldtone. Goldstone frets can be cleaned up easily by a luthier.
 

Joyful Uke

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From your comments about each, it seems like the Blackbird, Godin, and Flight are keepers for you.
 

PTOEguy

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I would sell them all and pick up a vintage Martin tenor and a soprano.
I have one vintage instrument (1927 Bacon and Day Silver Bell Plectrum Banjo), which is an awesome instrument, but in general I think owning something with that much history makes me nervous I'm going to drop it or forget to humidify properly.... The Bacon and Day is the exception because its got a reproduction neck and is not really a collectors item.
 

PTOEguy

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From your comments about each, it seems like the Blackbird, Godin, and Flight are keepers for you.
Yes - the Godin may go just because despite my affection, I just don't play it much. The Gold Tone will be kept until I get a better banjo uke, or decide that my tenor and plectrum banjos are filling the need adequately.
 

Mivo

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I would keep the Clara for sure. Not needing to babysit it when the humidity is low or erratic is such a big plus. I’d still like one of those, but they’ve always been out of stock when I convinced myself to get one. The laminated uke from Famous/Kiwaya has been a good alternative for me.

Going by what you said about the Godin, I’d keep that one also. Nice to have a good uke for plugging in.

I went through the ”thinning the herd” phase a few years ago and mostly haven’t regretted it. I still have six ukes, three of them sopranos, which I’d like to eventually reduce to two also, but four would be easier to do. I picked up two banjos since, one stock, one custom.

I see the forum was updated. Seems I’ll need a new avatar that fits better!
 

ripock

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I have one vintage instrument (1927 Bacon and Day Silver Bell Plectrum Banjo), which is an awesome instrument, but in general I think owning something with that much history makes me nervous I'm going to drop it or forget to humidify properly.... The Bacon and Day is the exception because its got a reproduction neck and is not really a collectors item.
Bacon and Day is my dream tenor guitar. I love those headstocks ever since I saw John Fahey playing that brand.
 

clear

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Sell the least played ones.
Or, if you play all of them equally, advertise them all. Take the ad down once you've sold the desired number.
 

Voran

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Relax, take a walk in the park. Play a few tunes. The mood will pass and in 2025 you will be glad you still have them all. Unless you really need the space in your house or you need the cash to pay the rent.

The logistics and supply chains are not improving on the planet. Now is a good time to hold nice ukes because it may not be that easy to just go out and find another one at a reasonable price. Supply and demand. Wait until January 2022 and see what happens over the next three months before moving any uke that may have a semblance of being something you like.

"Replaceable at $50" may be a thing of early 2022 which was nice when it was happening, but is gone for good soon. Or it may not be, only time will tell. Over the next three months we will find out if it is going to be a thing of the past. I suggest holding all ukes and re-visiting the question on 1 Feb 2022.
I agree with Bill. I would rather not sell something and then find my remaining one breaks and I can't get another one without paying massively jacked up prices.

*lovingly pats my cheap uke*

UAS is not necessarily a bad thing. Someone joked about stockpiling toilet paper and ukuleles, but I agree in complete seriousness - I'd rather not have only one of something I play for over an hour daily and really value and enjoy.
 

Jerryc41

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I've been playing uke for a while and have bought a lot of ukuleles to try out different things (scales, electronics, banjos, resonators, etc.) and now I'm getting into tenor banjo and I think I need to reduce my ukulele footprint for the good of my storage space (and marriage). Here's what I've currently got:

Blackbird Clara w/pickup (my main player - gets used frequently)
Godin Multi-uke (for playing plugged in - love the neck on this one)
Concert Flea - used to be my camping uke (friction tuners are finicky in temp changes)
Flight TUS - current camping uke (so replaceable at about $50)
Pono MB - rarely gets played, particularly now that I have a tenor guitar
Gold Tone Little Gem - Love the sound, but always seems to have sharp fret ends in my dry climate.

If you had to narrow this collection down to 2 or 3 ukes, what would you do?
I'd keep the Clara, Flight, and Flea.
 

PTOEguy

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I would keep the Clara for sure. Not needing to babysit it when the humidity is low or erratic is such a big plus. I’d still like one of those, but they’ve always been out of stock when I convinced myself to get one. The laminated uke from Famous/Kiwaya has been a good alternative for me.

Going by what you said about the Godin, I’d keep that one also. Nice to have a good uke for plugging in.

I went through the ”thinning the herd” phase a few years ago and mostly haven’t regretted it. I still have six ukes, three of them sopranos, which I’d like to eventually reduce to two also, but four would be easier to do. I picked up two banjos since, one stock, one custom.

I see the forum was updated. Seems I’ll need a new avatar that fits better!
I can highly recommend a Clara - the dynamic range available is off the charts, the tone is excellent, and it is great for both finger picking and strumming.

But I'll admit I've always wanted to try a Kiwaya uke - in particular the laminate, but its hard to justify when I'm playing banjo more these days - I play with a piano player who likes to try and stump me with weird keys - and tenor banjo is better for that.
 

PTOEguy

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I agree with Bill. I would rather not sell something and then find my remaining one breaks and I can't get another one without paying massively jacked up prices.

*lovingly pats my cheap uke*

UAS is not necessarily a bad thing. Someone joked about stockpiling toilet paper and ukuleles, but I agree in complete seriousness - I'd rather not have only one of something I play for over an hour daily and really value and enjoy.
I like the way you're thinking, and my wife is actually pretty understanding, but the stack in my living room is starting to get ridiculous. Plus, I need a few more dollars to replenish my personal mad money since I just ordered a banjo.
 

PTOEguy

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Sell the least played ones.
Or, if you play all of them equally, advertise them all. Take the ad down once you've sold the desired number.
Selling the least played ones is where I'm heading - advertising all would run the risk of losing specific functionality. Starting with least played would put the Godin, the Flea and the Pono on the bubble.

With respect to functionality, the flea is the one where its functional use as a camping uke is fully superseded by another uke (the Flight). The Godin is really great for plugging in, but I can plug in my Clara if needed - it doesn't have as much control over the sound and is more likely to have feedback issues, but it work. The Pono is trickier because I don't have another baritone uke, but I mainly use it when I need a lower set of tones - and these days I play the tenor guitar instead (although the Pono is a lot nicer instrument than my cheap tenor guitar).
 

Ed1

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Keep your main player, your camping uke, and the one you love the sound (either file the frets or humidify more).
This was easy for me to do for someone else. I admit to UAS for myself :)
 
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Mivo

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UAS is not necessarily a bad thing. Someone joked about stockpiling toilet paper and ukuleles, but I agree in complete seriousness - I'd rather not have only one of something I play for over an hour daily and really value and enjoy.
I found that having too many instruments was detrimental to my enjoyment of them. When I hit around 15+ ukuleles, I started to feel "swamped" by them and felt rather confused on which I actually liked, bouncing back and forth between different ukes. Then I just got tired of "stuff" in general and started to downsize. Donated hundreds of books to libraries, got rid of many video games, old clothes, ditched a lot of stuff, and also sold or rehomed a number of my instruments.

Now I own six ukuleles (three sopranos, and one concert, tenor, baritone), and plan to reduce that number to three or four soon. I also have two banjos, a guitar, and various small instruments. I've never been big on possessions (books aside), because I feel locked down by them (plus worrying about them), so UAS getting me as it did was pretty unexpected. The forum here certainly played a big role in fueling UAS. As soon as I started reading here, and saw what people had, I began to question my first uke and wondered if it was adequate. When instead of buying more ukes, all I needed to do to make my uke sound better was to practice more.

The upside, though, was that I got to experience a number of very different ukuleles that helped me find out what I like and what I don't like in a uke. Still, I believe that the focus on "collecting" (window-shopping, buying/selling, researching included) frequently prevented me from enjoying what I had. I feel that some limitations can enhance creativity, appreciation for what one has, and "happiness".
 

Ed1

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[SNIP] Now I own six ukuleles (three sopranos, and one concert, tenor, baritone), and plan to reduce that number to three or four soon. [SNIP]
I once told myself that when I had six :)

Seriously, when you talk to piano players, they will tell you how different sounds come from different pianos and how they wish they could have room for or afford more than one in their home. This is something that ukulele players don't have to think about the same way. So, enjoy your collection, and if you're like me, listen to their differences every now and then.
 
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Mivo

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I once told myself that when I had six
I had 17 simultaneously at one point! I'm at six for the second time, this time from a (to me) more desirable direction. :p I'd be happy with one or two (a soprano and the baritone), but the others have sentimental value (one is a 1920s soprano that I had restored, the concert was my very first uke, etc). I'll give away or sell the tenor next, since I never really cared much for tenors, but it's not valuable enough to deal with shipping it (out of boxes!) at this point.

I've been doing better with banjos: I only have two, one stock, one custom. I think that was a lesson the ukulele collecting taught me (to skip the slow upgrading that left me with too many instrument). Actually, I have a Deering banjolele, too, so I actually have seven ukes. Keep forgetting about it because I never really connected with it.
 

Voran

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I have one uke right now, Waterman on the way, and plan on getting maybe 3-4 different ones at some point in future...spare one for regular GCEA tuning, sopranissimo, ukubass and the Snail S60T tenor.