transition to guitalele - chord fingering help please!

johnnysmash

Active member
Joined
Sep 1, 2017
Messages
407
Points
28
It surprises me that no one mentioned that you can just play the guitalele just as you play guitar and not worry about what key you are in. That is unless you are playing with others. Then you need to transpose. I solved the problem by buying the EADGBE set of strings made for guitalele. Now everything I played on guitar I can play on guitalele, only easier since the instrument is much smaller.
 

Peter Frary

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 21, 2019
Messages
1,141
Points
63
I tried the EADGBE set on my Romero Creations guitalele and, while it worked, they were rather dull and floppy and just weren't fun to play. So I keep it tuned to ADGCEA and it really pops ah lick. It's just as nice at Terz guitar pitch, GCFA#DG, but a little easier to play. But, yeah, for solo style playing I just play it like my full sized guitars. If I jam with other musicians I know native requinto/ukulele chords and notes pretty well and don't have to transpose. Usually improvising so I don't need to think too much unless I have to read off a lead sheet.
 

aspieman456

Member
Joined
Dec 21, 2009
Messages
663
Points
18
I just got a guitalele over a week ago and I'm still learning to get the hang of playing with two extra strings.
 

Down Up Dick

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 1, 2014
Messages
4,103
Points
63
I just got a guitalele over a week ago and I'm still learning to get the hang of playing with two extra strings.
Yeah, I’m, more or less, in the same boat.

I’m using mine as a Classicalele and there haven’t been any chords so far, but I’d also like to use it as a regular (singing) guitar. However, chords are certainly not my forte’, so I’d like to find an easier way to play using chords. I know that I can just play them like a tenor guitar, and I’ve tried arpeggiating them. I know about power chords too. Those ways work okay, but on my mandolins I use two finger chords which are much easier for me to play and remember. Do guitarists use something like that?
 

Ms Bean

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 10, 2020
Messages
1,225
Points
83
Yeah, I’m, more or less, in the same boat.

I’m using mine as a Classicalele and there haven’t been any chords so far, but I’d also like to use it as a regular (singing) guitar. However, chords are certainly not my forte’, so I’d like to find an easier way to play using chords. I know that I can just play them like a tenor guitar, and I’ve tried arpeggiating them. I know about power chords too. Those ways work okay, but on my mandolins I use two finger chords which are much easier for me to play and remember. Do guitarists use something like that?
I'm a new guitalele player too, and 6 strings are definitely challenging me.

I would love to find a 30 day challenge or guitalele bootcamp. There don't seem to be many routine building programmes on YouTube for ukulele players getting into guitalele. So, for now, I'm just adapting a 30 day beginner guitar challenge https://yourguitaracademy.com/courses/30-day-beginner-challenge to familiarise myself with some techniques, chord shapes, and so on.

I was talking to my father-in-law, who showed me easier shell chords. Jazz guitarists use these all the time. Maybe you'll have to jazz up your usual repertoire. I haven't had the time yet to delve deeper into them myself. Here are some links:
https://www.jazzguitarlessons.net/blog/shell-voicings-jazz-guitar
https://www.jazzguitar.be/blog/shell-jazz-guitar-chords-beginners/
 

Down Up Dick

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 1, 2014
Messages
4,103
Points
63
Thanks, Ms Bean, I just got back from a shopping spree, so I’ll check yer info later.

My three great granddaughters and their mother are always talking about Mrs Bean, and here I am writing to her.