Uke Scales - Diagrams

Jeremy Chew

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Awesomeness!!! I can see your effort put into this to make our Uke music better!! Thanks heaps!!
 

_33

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Hi, I'm a new member. This information was a great help. I'm just starting to learn the ukulele. You inspired me to make a little web page that displays some of the same information you have. I haven't really tested it (different browsers) and I only added a couple of scales but I thought it might be handy. It's not pretty and there are things that are not right (all sharps when some should be flats). I'm a piano player so I added a keyboard so I could visualize.

http://www.finlayson.mobi/ukulele.html
 

_33

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Thanks! That one's great. I think I better look around this forum some more.
 

bigpoi789

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OMG!!!This is so Awesome!! I was waiting for something like this to come out so I could understand it easier visually! Thanks so much for putting it together! I know this will help me and other UUer's help get better at soloing! Much Mahalo's again!!:D
 

Tenzen

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Seems like there is enough demand for these, so enjoy. Please let me know if there are any errors, or if you have any suggestions.

Note: I'm not a graphic designer - if anyone wants to help out on these and make them a bit more professional (fret sizes, backgrounds, text) - I would really appreciate it.
what do you mean "It'll sound good no matter what red notes you play"

i dont get/believe that..

there must be some sort of rule of pattern u follow or something..

are you saying that simply hitting any of the tones in a given Scale will sound good, just because they are all in the same scale? and just randomly slap away at them?

how does that 'sound good'?
 

Barbablanca

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I am guessing you've never played an Appalachian Dulcimer or a Strumstick, Tenzen. On either of those instruments the scale available on the melody string has no "bum" notes and so hitting any of them will at least ensure the note in question is within the scale and therefore will not sound out of place.

What these charts are attempting to do is to offer the same option to Uke players as removing the "bum note" frets on the Strumstick does for players of that fun instrument.

Whether that is sufficient to then say any note will sound good, is, I suppose, debatable. But improvising using only the notes of the scale you are playing in is sure going to sound better than dropping a few bum notes in there (unless you're playing Jazz ;) )
 

Barbablanca

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Here is probably the single best interactive chords and scales for uke site I have found . Check this out ...

http://ukulelehelper.com/

Enjoy !

Wow, check out some of the the more exotic scales! I love the Algerian one! I got quite an authentic sounding "Arabic" tune going in no time at all! The Flamenco one will surely impress my Andalusian father-in-law ;)
 

Tenzen

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I am guessing you've never played an Appalachian Dulcimer or a Strumstick, Tenzen. On either of those instruments the scale available on the melody string has no "bum" notes and so hitting any of them will at least ensure the note in question is within the scale and therefore will not sound out of place.

What these charts are attempting to do is to offer the same option to Uke players as removing the "bum note" frets on the Strumstick does for players of that fun instrument.

Whether that is sufficient to then say any note will sound good, is, I suppose, debatable. But improvising using only the notes of the scale you are playing in is sure going to sound better than dropping a few bum notes in there (unless you're playing Jazz ;) )

thanks.. ya, i get that part of it.. i'm wondering if it comes along with a universal 'pattern' of some sort where you step in certain degrees or from certain strings, or whatever. or is it just to help your see what positions are available for a picking solo, you first have build up from the ground up like regular picking solos.
 

blue_knight_usa

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PDF created

Hi there, this was great. I was able to create a PDF doc after taking these and doing some resizing. If you would like it just send me a pm.
I don't want to post anything as this your work.

It looks great. I enlarged each slightly so each scale is on one page, so you can practice one scale at a time without any other distractions on the page.

Thanks for the scales!


Seems like there is enough demand for these, so enjoy. Please let me know if there are any errors, or if you have any suggestions.

Note: I'm not a graphic designer - if anyone wants to help out on these and make them a bit more professional (fret sizes, backgrounds, text) - I would really appreciate it.

I don't include every key or mode, just some of the common ones I use - if you have a request, let me know and I'll add it when I can. The "Whole, Half" and fret patterns work for the mode no matter what key you are in, so they can help to transpose too.

How to use:

The red dots are "safe" notes to use in the key of the song you are playing in. Major scales can be used in most songs with a majority of major chords, Pentatonic and pent minor often work over minor key. Blues scales work over almost anything - especially I, IV, V pattern rock and blues. Start with Major and Blues if you never tried solos before.

The glowing red dots, are your root note - match that to the key of the song and start your solos there and you should be fine. It'll sound good no matter what red notes you play. To play the whole scale in any key, just start on any glowing red dot, and finish on the next glowing red dot. That's an octave on that scale in that key.

The "First Position" stuff is simply an easy way to play the scale low on the neck with as many open strings as possible. Just play the fret number on the string in order and you have your basic scale. Remember that G=4th string, C=3rd String, E=2nd string, and A=1st string.

Here we go...

AMajorUke.jpg

CMajorUke.jpg

DMajorUke-1.jpg

EMajorUke.jpg
 

mailman

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On the A major scale: shouldn't it read "First Position, 4th string, 2, 4? It seems the B note was omitted.

Just a minor thing. Thanks for all the work, Grumpy....
 

Nickie

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Thanks so much for the scales. I've been trying them! I think it will really help me read music and play by ear faster, cause all I never knew before was the C major scale!