Ukulele Instruction

Jerryc41

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Occasionally, someone at our weekly jam would try to "teach" us something. I find that to be worse than a waste of time. It just takes away from the playing. Today, one of our members is planning to explain "Major and Minor scales chords and triads, and stuff." He's not a uke teacher. Just because he can do it, that doesn't mean he can teach others how to do it. I've experienced enough of these that I'm going to stay home today. He'll place his fingers on the fretboard, but we won't be able to see exactly where they are.

I've been to a dozen or more uke fests, and some instructors know how to teach, and some don't. Now I know which ones to avoid. Being able to play doesn't mean being able to teach someone how to play.

Any comments? I'd prefer comments that agree with my opinion. 😆😆😆
 

LukuleleStrings

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An awful lot of people learn a thing and then immediately try to teach it. I think it muddies the waters when you’re looking for stuff with more substance.
 

badhabits

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simple fix....when the "lesson" starts, stand up, walk away, come back when the "lesson" is over. perhaps other members might find it useful...or not. or if you're the only there just say "I don't need this cr@p, let's play!"
 

EDW

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Good points. It really muddies things when that is not the purpose of the session. Perhaps they can set aside a half hour before or after for any of those who wish to connect with this person
 

tm3

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A reasonable solution might be to carve out 15 minutes or so either right before the jam or right after and let all the "teaching" be done then, for those who are interested.
 

donboody

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I mean youre right, but may as well let him do it anyhow. Seems to make him feel good, which is the only reason I play.
 

Jerryc41

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simple fix....when the "lesson" starts, stand up, walk away, come back when the "lesson" is over. perhaps other members might find it useful...or not. or if you're the only there just say "I don't need this cr@p, let's play!"
I'm not that "aggressive." :)
 

Jerryc41

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A reasonable solution might be to carve out 15 minutes or so either right before the jam or right after and let all the "teaching" be done then, for those who are interested.
I heard of a group somewhere that had lessons for the first half hour.
 

EDW

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If all else fails.........El Kabong!

 

ripock

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this sounds really bush-league/unprofessional. When the group gets together it is to meld and play the music that it was intending to play. Each individual should have taken steps on his or her own time to assure that they are ready to do that. Group time is for the group and not the individual...at least that's how I have experienced it.
 

clear

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I've experienced enough of these that I'm going to stay home today. He'll place his fingers on the fretboard, but we won't be able to see exactly where they are.

I've been to a dozen or more uke fests, and some instructors know how to teach, and some don't. Now I know which ones to avoid. Being able to play doesn't mean being able to teach someone how to play.

Any comments? I'd prefer comments that agree with my opinion. 😆😆😆

I agree with you that if you already know he's no good at teaching, you might as well stay home. You can get more uke time at home.
 

Brad Bordessa

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Teaching is mostly a learned skill. Sounds like you should create a venue for these "bad" instructors outside of the jam. Otherwise where are they going to hone their chops?
 

clear

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Teaching is mostly a learned skill. Sounds like you should create a venue for these "bad" instructors outside of the jam. Otherwise where are they going to hone their chops?

But Jerry already knows... if you are in his shoes, would you want to waste time and be a guinea pig?
 

Brad Bordessa

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But Jerry already knows... if you are in his shoes, would you want to waste time and be a guinea pig?

No. But I imagine the info would be useful to somebody in the group. Not everybody learns the same way. Lots of people like instructors I think are lame and vice versa.

If you move the lesson to a different time/place/venue, those who appreciate the info could still learn and Jerry wouldn't need to sit through something he didn't like.
 

Cadia

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An awful lot of people learn a thing and then immediately try to teach it. I think it muddies the waters when you’re looking for stuff with more substance.
I agree. I've seen a few YouTube videos like this. Though I think they mean well, they don't have a base of knowledge to build on.
 

richntacoma

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Good groups always have clear purpose and functions. One strategy is to have a discussion about the purpose of the group, and what people believe are the activities that support that purpose. If this is done at a time when said teaching does not occur, then it may lead to a resolution without anyone having to feel called out and shamed.

Some people are fairly natural at teaching, others need a long time to develop their chops. Some people who have taught a long time actually spend the time developing their teaching skills, others do not. I have been a college proff for 23 years, and in truth, I think I was just as good a teacher after about year 5 as I am now--if I am being honest with myself.

Now, I will also say, that sometimes that people who are not great at a think make better teachers than the masters. I took ule lessons for a while with someone who is a killer player, but in hindsight, I think he had a hard time that I did not move as fast as he wished I did, or that he would have at one point. I am taking lessons from a player now who is not nearly as talented, but he takes his time, tries to explain things in multiple ways, and does a good job at both maximizing my strengths and correcting me.
 

ksiegel

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I heard of a group somewhere that had lessons for the first half hour.
San Jose Ukulele Club does that. Using a projector and PA, showing and explaining hand positions.

It works out well. (Hi, Gillian!)

When we were meeting in Troy, we tried that, too. Sometimes it worked.

And I recall using the chalkboard at the Guilderland Library to draw the chord diagrams before playing them, showing a few variations.
(I keep getting reminded that I showed the 1-finger move from a B to an E-minor, by using a barre chord; obviously, that diagram stuck.)


-Kurt​
 

peanuts56

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It seem here's always one PITA who needs to stick their 2 cents in. I did a PD for the music dept. I taught in some years ago. One guy brought a baritone and had to try to explain the differences. He was probably voted most likely to interrupt in high school. When he paused to breath I just started back up and didn't let him interrupt again. Not a bad guy but he seems to always need to stick his nose in things whether it was a PD or a dept. meeting. Glad I'm retired and don't have to deal with him any more. Take a few deep breaths Jerry and relax. If that doesn't work may the El Cabong suggestion is the answer!!!!!!! Don't use an expensive uke!!!