Ukuleles with fat C shape neck profiles

bsfloyd

Member
Joined
Nov 24, 2017
Messages
800
Points
18
In the guitar world, we call these baseball bat necks - well, at least back in the 80s and 90s we did. Basically a deep C neck profile.

I love the soprano size ukulele, but a thin neck profile gives me troubles. I have a Pono mango and find the deep C neck profile on it to be perfect. My Martin S-O can be troublesome at times. I have read KoAloha Ohio has deeper profiles but I’ve never played one. I know Bruko has a larger neck profile but I find them to be more of a D shape rather a C shape - C shape being more fully rounded and D shape having more of a shoulder to it. Are there any other deep C profile ukuleles out there? Thanks.
 
Last edited:

actadh

Active member
Joined
Jan 12, 2014
Messages
2,048
Points
38
My Shima ukulele has a rounder and thicker neck. Soprano body and concert length neck, with tenor width and thickness of neck.
 

bsfloyd

Member
Joined
Nov 24, 2017
Messages
800
Points
18
Thanks, Laura! How would you compare it to your KoAloha and Bruko?
 

actadh

Active member
Joined
Jan 12, 2014
Messages
2,048
Points
38
Hi bsfloyd -It is right there with the sound of those two with similar resonance and crisp notes. Looks-wise, it has the same understated beauty. I have been playing jazz and blues on it. There is a great review of the Shima here on UU from Baz.

Took me a bit to get used to the neck - it is nothing like my thinner neck Mainland tenor and the Outdoor tenor is more squared. The neck is closer to my Vega baritone, so it was more a matter of retraining the muscle memory, as I usually play soprano. But, I do that anyway with the baritone and tenors. After a song or two I get used to it having more than twelve frets :)
 

ukulelekarcsi

Member
Joined
May 27, 2010
Messages
484
Points
18
Fleas and Flukes have a fairly thick 'half-a-branch' necks. I can't think of any quality sopranos with a bigger neck than that.
 

Dohle

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 23, 2019
Messages
1,182
Points
63
Fleas and Flukes have a fairly thick 'half-a-branch' necks. I can't think of any quality sopranos with a bigger neck than that.

I would've suggested Magic Fluke ukes as well but they have a definite flat point at the back of the neck, so more of a D shape. I understood that that's something the OP was not looking for. But if that's not a huge issue then you'd be pressed to find a chunkier neck on a soprano.
 

Pirate Jim

Member
Joined
Jul 24, 2014
Messages
615
Points
18
As someone who likes a chunky neck I love the fluke / flea necks. The flat back is a little odd at first but it's incredibly comfortable for me. Had to sell the best soprano I ever had (Takumi 3k) because I found the slender neck really uncomfortable.
 

Jarmo_S

New member
Joined
Aug 23, 2017
Messages
682
Points
0
Playing without a strap, meaning not always thumb behind the neck and with some thin necks. I feel that too, that a thicker neck is better for me.
 

John Colter

UU VIP
UU VIP
Joined
Jan 28, 2009
Messages
2,745
Points
63
I've just bought a Koa Kalane soprano pineapple shape. I'm very pleased with it. One noticeable feature is its chunky neck. From the surface of the fretboard to the back of the neck, it measures 22mm at the seventh fret and 19mm at the nut. My KoAloha, in comparison, is about 18mm at both points. I enjoy playing each of them but, if anything, I have a slight leaning towards a thicker neck.

John Colter
 

bsfloyd

Member
Joined
Nov 24, 2017
Messages
800
Points
18
Thanks for the replies everyone! I have read about the Fleas and Flukes with their chunky necks, and also that they are a bit flat in the center. But, I may need to revisit them as the choices are few. So, a Flea neck compared to a Bruko neck... which is more D shape like, and slight difference or major difference?
 

bsfloyd

Member
Joined
Nov 24, 2017
Messages
800
Points
18
I've just bought a Koa Kalane soprano pineapple shape. I'm very pleased with it. One noticeable feature is its chunky neck. From the surface of the fretboard to the back of the neck, it measures 22mm at the seventh fret and 19mm at the nut. My KoAloha, in comparison, is about 18mm at both points. I enjoy playing each of them but, if anything, I have a slight leaning towards a thicker neck.

John Colter

Koa Kalane... this is the first I’ve heard of them. I will need to look this up. Thanks.
 

ukulelekarcsi

Member
Joined
May 27, 2010
Messages
484
Points
18
To be clear, I do like the Flea and Fluke necks.

In my experience, Bruko's haven't got especially thick necks. As for the other end of the spectrum, I have a 1970s (fujigen?) soprano with a neck so thin it's scary to tune up to pitch (but it plays wonderfully).
 

plunker

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 22, 2014
Messages
1,024
Points
48
I have heard comments that Ponos have thick necks. Look into one.
 

Bill Sheehan

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 3, 2016
Messages
1,731
Points
63
I have heard comments that Ponos have thick necks. Look into one.

I can affirm this, plunker. My experience has been along the same lines as bsfloyd indicated in his initial post: as much as I love my Martin S-0 soprano, its fairly shallow neck profile can make my fretting hand get a little crampy after a while. On the other hand, the deeper, rounder-feeling neck on my Pono mango soprano "fills up" my fretting hand a little more, and seems to provide greater comfort in longer playing sessions. They are both great ukes, though!
 

Ziret

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 7, 2016
Messages
1,725
Points
48
I can affirm this, plunker. My experience has been along the same lines as bsfloyd indicated in his initial post: as much as I love my Martin S-0 soprano, its fairly shallow neck profile can make my fretting hand get a little crampy after a while. On the other hand, the deeper, rounder-feeling neck on my Pono mango soprano "fills up" my fretting hand a little more, and seems to provide greater comfort in longer playing sessions. They are both great ukes, though!

Good to see you, Bill! I’ve been wondering how you’re doing.