What strings on a longneck Concert?

Ukulele Kyle

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Hello,

What strings would you use on a longneck concert? In particular a KAMAKA HF-2L CONCERT LONGNECK? Would it still be concert strings or tenor because of the longer 17” scale neck? It comes with Kamaka strings already installed, anyone else swap them out with other brands and really liking them?

Thanks,

Kyle
 

Dohle

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Yes, tenor strings is the answer. These kinds of ukes are often called long neck concerts or super concerts or whatever, but ultimately it's the scale length of the instrument that matters, and the scale length in this case is tenor.
 

DownUpDave

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The usual answer is tenor because of the 17” tenor scale length. But you can use concert gauge strings if you want lower tension, brighter sound, more sustain. I owned a Kamaka super concert and a few other super concerts, don’t be afraid to experiment with a lighter string.
 

Ukulele Kyle

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Thank you very helping me with the question. I was going to start stocking up on concert strings, since all I play are tenors right now. Probably will try some concert strings at some point to see the difference.
 

Croaky Keith

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I have KoAloha Opio acacia & Ohana mahogany tenor scale ukes on which I use Living Water low G fluorocarbons - I also use them on my tenor necked Ohana mahogany soprano bodied uke too. :)
 

Ukulele Kyle

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I just picked up 3 packs of Low-G Living Water Strings yesterday and can’t wait to try them out on one of my Tenors. I heard some really good things about them with an added Fremont Soloist as your Low-G fourth string! It’s fun experimenting with tone/sound chasing. Right?
 

snowdenn

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The usual answer is tenor because of the 17” tenor scale length. But you can use concert gauge strings if you want lower tension, brighter sound, more sustain.

So as a rule of thumb, does putting smaller scale strings on a larger scale instrument typically cause lower tension? And larger scale strings on a smaller scale instrument makes for higher tension? Put another way, soprano strings on a tenor creates less tension? Tenor strings on a soprano is more tension?
 

DownUpDave

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So as a rule of thumb, does putting smaller scale strings on a larger scale instrument typically cause lower tension? And larger scale strings on a smaller scale instrument makes for higher tension? Put another way, soprano strings on a tenor creates less tension? Tenor strings on a soprano is more tension?

Yes you are correct. Tenor strings are thickest in diameter, then concert, then soprano. The thicker or larger in diameter a string is the higher the tension on a given scale length.
 

snowdenn

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Yes you are correct. Tenor strings are thickest in diameter, then concert, then soprano. The thicker or larger in diameter a string is the higher the tension on a given scale length.

Thanks!

and more characters
 

WebParrot (s2)

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Yes you are correct. Tenor strings are thickest in diameter, then concert, then soprano. The thicker or larger in diameter a string is the higher the tension on a given scale length.

Sorry for the belated inquiry... I've been following this thread and it raised a curiosity about Joel's Uke Logic sets.

Whether the high tension or low tension, his sets are not specific to scale. Each is labeled "Sop/Con/Ten" ... yet there is a designated set for High or Low. Any ideas what's happening... or not ?

I suppose this kind of "universality" would (then) benefit the 'long neck' or 'super' group of scales.

s2
 
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DownUpDave

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Sorry for the belated inquiry... I've been following this thread and it raised a curiosity about Joel's Uke Logic sets.

Whether the high tension or low tension, his sets are not specific to scale. Each is labeled "Sop/Con/Ten" ... yet there is a designated set for High or Low. Any ideas what's happening... or not ?

I suppose this kind of "universality" would (then) benefit the 'long neck' or 'super' group of scales.

s2

That is a very good question.......which I have no answer for as I haven’t used those strings before. The larger diameter equals higher tension is a general rule of thumb for most strings with in the same brands.

Going to more expensive custom strings they can fool around with the compound to make higher tension or different tone in about the same diameter. I know that is what Dirk did when he was alive with his South Coast strings. I had conversations with him and he would use different formulas with in the same string set. His e string in the HML-RW set was a different color, more milky then clear compared to the a string.
 

SailingUke

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My KoAloha super concert was my low g ukulele for a long time. I have found hi g fluorocarbons sound the best.
The small concert body really brings out the highs and the longer scale gives it a loud voice.
 

Donho17

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I have owned a Koaloha Super concert for 7 years. When I purchased it (from HMS) it came with the stock Koaloha strings. Which I understand are Worth tenor clears in hi G. A few years and a few Worth sets later I changed to Low G Worth’s. Personally, I love the sound of low G on this uke. A couple of years ago I discovered PhD strings and have used them ever since. The PhD strings seem brighter with better sustain than the Worth’s to me.
 

WebParrot (s2)

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Going to more expensive custom strings they can fool around with the compound to make higher tension or different tone in about the same diameter. I know that is what Dirk did when he was alive with his South Coast strings. I had conversations with him and he would use different formulas with in the same string set. His e string in the HML-RW set was a different color, more milky then clear compared to the a string.

That observation makes some sense. Taking the creation of strings beyond fishing line :) I might pose the question to Joel with my next order (likely years away!)