What's happening in your shed?

Titchtheclown

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Sometimes the customer says I want what you just made. Sometimes I ask what they really want.
Sometimes nothing else matters.20210406_205258.jpg
20210406_205234.jpg

Recycled meranti body painted matt black.
Spotted gum fretboard and tassie oak neck stained with vinegar and steel wool. Next time I do a black body I will go the same way as the neck. Fret dots in kitchen leftover abalone. Cheap Chinese electrics and hardware.
Control panel and covers from an old polka LP. Logo is clients initials fed into online Metallica name logo generator cut and engraved in and back filled with a white timber filler.
 

gerardg

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Dec 12, 2009
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Ukuleles wood scraps ...

0SlY6DuoPQUzwNllrs58-r3kOtE.jpg


UMcoLUxrSX8nvcTm5A-pgqr2kf8.jpg
 

tonyturley

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I just finished a 14 month build of a 23" scale small body 6-string guitar. Old growth Red Spruce and old growth Honduran Mahogany, both of which were harvested over 30 years ago and allowed to season all that time. I'm very pleased with the tone, both acoustic and on the amp. I currently have a partially completed tenor uke on the bench. For it I'm using spares and scrap wood I have laying around the shop. It's purpose is to have a uke I can hang on the wall and grab when inspiration strikes. I gave my best tenor uke to a niece as a Christmas gift. I love building these things, and have given a couple away to relatives for birthday & Christmas.

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Matt Clara

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Uke-PXL_20210407_232907441.jpgYa'll make me look like an amateur, which I am. Here's my first attempt at inlay on my current build of American cherry and black walnut with a sitka spruce top. Spanish cedar and walnut neck.
 

BuzzBD

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Nice work and welcome back Matt. It is nice to hear from you again.
Brad
 

Tom Snape

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I am finding that fitting the ribs for this dombra is very challenging. I had to bend a new piece for the last rib because the first one I made ended up too narrow to fill the gap. I have resigned myself to the fact that all the joints on this first attempt will not be perfect, and I intend to reinforce the joints internally with some fabric. A great luthiery learning experience! (That's tea in the mug, by the way).

Gluing_ribs

Rib_bending
 

Jerryc41

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I am finding that fitting the ribs for this dombra is very challenging. I had to bend a new piece for the last rib because the first one I made ended up too narrow to fill the gap. I have resigned myself to the fact that all the joints on this first attempt will not be perfect, and I intend to reinforce the joints internally with some fabric. A great luthiery learning experience! (That's tea in the mug, by the way).

That's quite an operation. Since you're from Maine, I'll ask if you know Joel Ekhaus, a prolific builder of stringed instruments.

Oh, it looks like he's retiring. https://www.earnestinstruments.com/earnest-instruments-joel-eckhaus/
 

Tom Snape

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Hi Jerry - I don't know Joel Eckhaus personally, but I know of his work. He graciously hosted me at his shop in Portland about 15 years ago and showed me how he worked. At the time he was busy making and marketing his Tulelele model. I also remember a number of vintage tenor guitars hanging around, which seemed to be a particular interest of his. I had just begun building ukuleles and I had two or three of my first examples in the the car. He asked to see them. These examples were all finished well, but over braced and heavy, so pretty dead sound wise. Still, he was polite and had encouraging comments.

This is a photo of some Earnest instruments he had on display at the 2018 Luthier's Exhibition in Hallowell Maine.

Earnest_instruments
 
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Jerryc41

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Hi Jerry - I don't know Joel Eckhaus personally, but I know of his work. He graciously hosted me at his shop in Portland about 15 years ago and showed me how he worked. At the time he was busy making and marketing his Tulelele model. I also remember a number of vintage tenor guitars hanging around, which seemed to be a particular interest of his. I had just begun building ukuleles and I had two or three of my first examples in the the car. He asked to see them. These examples were all finished well, but over braced and heavy, so pretty dead sound wise. Still, he was polite and had encouraging comments.

This is a photo of some Earnest instruments he had on display at the 2018 Luthier's Exhibition in Hallowell Maine.

Earnest_instruments

I met Joel at the uke fest n Ashokan, about two miles from me a few years ago. Years later, I bought a 1944 Martin from him. He had replaced the damaged top with spruce.

Joel is a good player, too. He explained how he learned from Roy Smeck. Let me see if I can find a picture. Yep - May, 2015.

Joel Ekhaus.jpg
 

Dusepo

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I am finding that fitting the ribs for this dombra is very challenging.

Looks great so far. If I may offer some advice, I'd reccomend to start with the centre rib and work outwards. This will make it easier (as well as practice).
 

Tom Snape

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Looks great so far. If I may offer some advice, I'd reccomend to start with the centre rib and work outwards. This will make it easier (as well as practice).

Okay, I'll try that next time. Thanks for the advice.