What's happening in your shed?

tonyturley

Member
Joined
Aug 29, 2018
Messages
583
Points
18
I took a break from my main project to do a tuner retrofit on a paddle head baritone uke I completed early last year. I never much cared for either of the friction tuners I used on the instrument, so I removed the old tuners, shaved about a millimeter from each side of the headstock, refinished, and installed a set of Gotoh UPT-L. Much better. I also didn't much care for the unwound 4th string of the PhD fluoro set I installed today, so I pulled it right off and installed an unused Savarez Alliance HT classical 5th string that I had laying around. Huge improvement over the unwound fluoro D string.

DSCF4414.jpg
DSCF4417.jpg
DSCF4419.jpg
 
Last edited:

Titchtheclown

Member
Joined
Oct 10, 2012
Messages
733
Points
18
This little mermaid tenor uke is a cuter than I expected. The use of sunglasses as a bridge was an inspired move. Dyed the spotted gum fretboard by diluting a little oil paint in turps.
Making this uke has made me happier with a build than I have in a long time. The only thing I might do different next time is give her a uke of her own to hold and fiddle the body shape jusy a little. Bandsawn bowl pine body, spotted gum fretboard. Glow in the dark front fret dots red plastic side fret dots. Painted with acrylics outlining and highlighting with black permanent marker and gold paint pen. Glitter added to first coat of monocel varnish.

I really splashed out, scaling a new wave of uke making with a radical switching of heads and tails using the tail as a headstock and a hairpiece as a tailpiece.

20210821_123837.jpg
20210821_124152.jpg

Afterthought: Making the tail still asymmetric but level tipped to allow it to stand against a wall would be a practical improvement I could make without damaging the aesthetics too much.
 
Last edited:

Jerryc41

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 4, 2015
Messages
8,280
Points
48
I took a break from my main project to do a tuner retrofit on a paddle head baritone uke I completed early last year. I never much cared for either of the friction tuners I used on the instrument, so I removed the old tuners, shaved about a millimeter from each side of the headstock, refinished, and installed a set of Gotoh UPT-L. Much better. I also didn't much care for the unwound 4th string of the PhD flouro set I installed today, so I pulled it right off and installed an unused Savarez Alliance HT classical 5th string that I had laying around. Huge improvement over the unwound flouro D string.

View attachment 135166
View attachment 135167
View attachment 135168

Very nice. I like alternate headstock designs.
 

Jerryc41

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 4, 2015
Messages
8,280
Points
48
This little mermaid tenor uke is a cuter than I expected. The use of sunglasses as a bridge was an inspired move. Dyed the spotted gum fretboard by diluting a little oil paint in turps.
Making this uke has made me happier with a build than I have in a long time. The only thing I might do different next time is give her a uke of her own to hold and fiddle the body shape jusy a little. Bandsawn bowl pine body, spotted gum fretboard. Glow in the dark front fret dots red plastic side fret dots. Painted with acrylics outlining and highlighting with black permanent marker and gold paint pen. Glitter added to first coat of monocel varnish.

I really splashed out, scaling a new wave of uke making with a radical switching of heads and tails using the tail as a headstock and a hairpiece as a tailpiece.

View attachment 135169
View attachment 135170

Afterthought: Making the tail still asymmetric but level tipped to allow it to stand against a wall would be a practical improvement I could make without damaging the aesthetics too much.

That's great!
 

hoji

Member
Joined
Apr 15, 2016
Messages
140
Points
16
This little mermaid tenor uke is a cuter than I expected. The use of sunglasses as a bridge was an inspired move. Dyed the spotted gum fretboard by diluting a little oil paint in turps.
Making this uke has made me happier with a build than I have in a long time. The only thing I might do different next time is give her a uke of her own to hold and fiddle the body shape jusy a little. Bandsawn bowl pine body, spotted gum fretboard. Glow in the dark front fret dots red plastic side fret dots. Painted with acrylics outlining and highlighting with black permanent marker and gold paint pen. Glitter added to first coat of monocel varnish.

I really splashed out, scaling a new wave of uke making with a radical switching of heads and tails using the tail as a headstock and a hairpiece as a tailpiece.

View attachment 135169
View attachment 135170

Afterthought: Making the tail still asymmetric but level tipped to allow it to stand against a wall would be a practical improvement I could make without damaging the aesthetics too much.

Titch, this is the real thing. A masterpiece. I got to admit, you have me rethinking my entire approach to instrument design. I would speculate that in 100 years, it will be these works of art will be valued by humanity, and maybe not the "could have been made in a factory" things most of us are trying to make. This screams handmade, made by a human with emotions, skill, joy, and love for making music. These are the values we want to pass on to future generations, and I believe it's through these artifacts that we must do so. Thank you.
 

Timbuck

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 10, 2009
Messages
5,847
Points
48
These are the last three Sopranos I'll be completing for a while...from next week I will be completing the 17 part finished Sopranos I have put into storage over the pandemic.. and I will start selling them again on eBay ...The world wide postage is improving a little but deliveries outside the UK are more expensive and can be very slow.
C8712389-F219-4E89-8AD6-7073B8EEB3EA by Ken Timms,
 
Last edited:

Titchtheclown

Member
Joined
Oct 10, 2012
Messages
733
Points
18
Titch, this is the real thing. A masterpiece. I got to admit, you have me rethinking my entire approach to instrument design. I would speculate that in 100 years, it will be these works of art will be valued by humanity, and maybe not the "could have been made in a factory" things most of us are trying to make. This screams handmade, made by a human with emotions, skill, joy, and love for making music. These are the values we want to pass on to future generations, and I believe it's through these artifacts that we must do so. Thank you.

Crikey! I just thought I was a bloke mucking about in his shed.
 

tonyturley

Member
Joined
Aug 29, 2018
Messages
583
Points
18
Start of a new ukulele project, even though my current project isn't quite finished. Too many ideas and too much wood to use to work on one at a time. I've tried it both ways, having as many as 6 in construction simultaneously (too many!), now I'm going to try 3 at once. I currently have enough wood for 4 or 5 more ukes.

Sycamore sides.jpgbaritone mold.jpg
 

Jerryc41

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 4, 2015
Messages
8,280
Points
48
Start of a new ukulele project, even though my current project isn't quite finished. Too many ideas and too much wood to use to work on one at a time. I've tried it both ways, having as many as 6 in construction simultaneously (too many!), now I'm going to try 3 at once. I currently have enough wood for 4 or 5 more ukes.

View attachment 135227View attachment 135228

I love the looks of that mold. I thought I might try to make one. I see them for sale for $99 and up, but how much fun is that? There are no mistakes to try to correct. :D
 

Sam.R.B

Member
Joined
Aug 15, 2018
Messages
29
Points
6
Latest ukulele I've been working on while I'm home from school, took a lot of inspiration for the headstock from @banjopete on instagram. I was on the fence about it but I'm really loving the way it turned out.
 

Attachments

  • uke.jpg
    uke.jpg
    14.2 KB · Views: 13
Last edited:

tonyturley

Member
Joined
Aug 29, 2018
Messages
583
Points
18
I spent much of yesterday jointing, joining, and thickness sanding the Sycamore plates for the new baritone ukulele project. The top was sanded to 1.9mm and the back to 2.2mm thick. A light pencil line helps me keep track of the nearly invisible center glue joint.

Kasha plates.jpg
 

tonyturley

Member
Joined
Aug 29, 2018
Messages
583
Points
18
A newly bent Sycamore baritone ukulele side cools in the mold while its mating half awaits trimming and sanding.

Kasha sides.jpg
 

tonyturley

Member
Joined
Aug 29, 2018
Messages
583
Points
18
Layout work on the baritone neck. This instrument, my 12th ukulele, is going to be my first Spanish Heel neck. I've avoided this method of construction due to its difficulty . . . or at least my perception of its difficulty. The wood is 100+ year old reclaimed American Chestnut from right here in my home state. Inspired by this project: https://www.guitarmaker.com/instrument/270/the-wormy-american-chestnut-ukulele

Don't know yet what I'll do with the Chestnut off-cut, but it won't go in the bin. I'll find some use for it.

Kasha neck layout.jpg
 

tonyturley

Member
Joined
Aug 29, 2018
Messages
583
Points
18
A trio of ukulele necks in various stages of construction. The one on the left is Black Walnut with a Sycamore core, and the other two are Cherry with a Black Walnut core. Going to be used for a 17” scale Grand Tenor and a pair of 19” scale long-neck tenors.

DSCF4422.JPG
DSCF4423.JPG
DSCF4424.JPG
 

lauburu

Member
Joined
Jul 10, 2012
Messages
545
Points
18
E Bass.JPG
Right handed bass for a left handed player. Based on Hofner Beatles bass. Only modifications are the knobs and the fretboard side dots have changed sides. Interesting project
 

tonyturley

Member
Joined
Aug 29, 2018
Messages
583
Points
18
For my most current ukulele project (a 19" scale long neck tenor) I decided to make a "kit" to organize what I need to begin construction. American Sycamore for the back & sides; salvaged old growth Redwood for the top; Cherry with a Black Walnut core for the neck; BW for the bindings, end graft, and peghead overlay; Osage Orange for the fretboard and bridge. All of these woods were harvested here in my home state except the Redwood, which came from California. The Osage Orange fretboard and bridge will deepen to a rich golden brown with exposure to UV light. I just resurfaced them this morning to remove the mill marks, and they are now under a 24/7 UV lamp.

Sycamore tenor kit.jpg