What's happening in your shed?

sequoia

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Nice plane... Remember that there is such a thing as getting too thin and I would say 1.6 mm is getting pretty darn close to too thin. This is 1/16 of an inch or 0.062 decimal which is what I measure things in since I'm a Yank. Also keep in mind that you will be taking off more wood as you sand out before finishing so that your final sound board thickness can be 0.005 thinner making it 0.057 final thickness. I don't know what this is in metric. Too thin a sound board is just as bad as too thick a soundboard. Too thin soundboards got no balls and no balls is not good when it comes to concert ukuleles which basically got no balls to begin with. (Ha! ducks quickly and runs away) But then again, every piece of wood is a little different. Good luck!
 

BrianMahoney

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Thanks sequoia, I'll see how it all works out. Worst case I know I have the basics of thickness planing and should only get better.

Brian
 

jupiteruke

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rosettes - clockwise or counter-clockwise ?

I have been experimenting and developing some jigs and templates to create 'spiral' rosettes. (Thanks to Beau Hannam for the idea & inspiration.) The question arises, should the spiral go counter-clockwise (fat part under the first string) or counter-clockwise (fat part under the 4'th string)? Does it make a difference if the instrument is low-G or high-G?
 

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jupiteruke

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The first is pink abalone (Haliotis corrugata), with a more green selection (it comes pinker or greener) and the second rosette is 'heart' from pink abalone, selected for a real pink color.
 

sequoia

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I have been experimenting and developing some jigs and templates to create 'spiral' rosettes. (Thanks to Beau Hannam for the idea & inspiration.) The question arises, should the spiral go counter-clockwise (fat part under the first string) or counter-clockwise (fat part under the 4'th string)? Does it make a difference if the instrument is low-G or high-G?

This is one of those things I think that could go either way. Kinda like an end graft wedge: Triangle up or down? ... If I had to go with one, I would go with the fat part of the spiral down. Always go with the design that rests the eye and the fat part should be down like it would be if it had weight in gravity. It is a design thing.
 

sequoia

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Now that is what I would call a real production run. Ford would be proud of you, but as anyone knows 21 is a much luckier number than 20.
 

printer2

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I have been experimenting and developing some jigs and templates to create 'spiral' rosettes. (Thanks to Beau Hannam for the idea & inspiration.) The question arises, should the spiral go counter-clockwise (fat part under the first string) or counter-clockwise (fat part under the 4'th string)? Does it make a difference if the instrument is low-G or high-G?

So one model is left handed and the other right?
 

jupiteruke

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I can make them either way, so there would be a right handed vs left handed model only if I decide that there is only one way to make the spiral. In any case a left handed player could flip the instrument over, and would get the 'other' form. Depending on his aesthetics that may or may not be a deal breaker on converting an instrument to left handed.
 

Beau Hannam Ukuleles

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I have been experimenting and developing some jigs and templates to create 'spiral' rosettes. (Thanks to Beau Hannam for the idea & inspiration.) The question arises, should the spiral go counter-clockwise (fat part under the first string) or counter-clockwise (fat part under the 4'th string)? Does it make a difference if the instrument is low-G or high-G?

Nice!.

When i'm asked to do the spiral rosette, I just ask the customer which direction they prefer. I've looked at it and i can argue for either direction however there is no real logical reason why one direction is more correct or better...that i can divine.
 

sequoia

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Nice!.

When i'm asked to do the spiral rosette, I just ask the customer which direction they prefer. I've looked at it and i can argue for either direction however there is no real logical reason why one direction is more correct or better...that i can divine.

Again I think this question can be explained by what the mind of the viewer expects. People are comfortable with clock hands moving in a clockwise direction thus left to right. Remember that we are primitive creatures and our minds like the universe to move in certain directions. Thus clockwise. Plus the design looks like it is moving forwards (towards the neck) and not backwards to the heel. Moving forward is always more inspiring. On the other hand it might not make a diddly of difference so who cares?
 

printer2

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I can make them either way, so there would be a right handed vs left handed model only if I decide that there is only one way to make the spiral. In any case a left handed player could flip the instrument over, and would get the 'other' form. Depending on his aesthetics that may or may not be a deal breaker on converting an instrument to left handed.

Meant as a joke, well at least I laughed when typing it.
 
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Six ukuleles of various sizes built over the past 6-8 months. They have been made in different ways with the processes all documented. The plan is a book on building ukuleles which should be ready towards the end of the year.

6ukes_@1600.jpg

From the left. A soprano made following the 1917 film made from all Australian Blackwood; a soprano along the lines of a 1920s Regal with a doweled neck, made from Tulip Satinwood; a concert after the classic Martin design, all mahogany; a tenor with the body based on a Gibson guitar with a bolt on neck, redwood soundboard and mahogany body; another bol-on neck tenor with the body from Australian red cedar and mahogany neck; and baritone with a Sitka soundboard, tamarind body and Queensland maple neck. Tamarind looks gorgeous, but is heavy and leathery and a bastard to work with.
 

Allen

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A concert and tenor underway. Tenor in Australian Blackwood, the concert will be Tasmanian Tiger Myrtle and Ancient Sitka Spruce.

Soundboards1.jpgSoundboards2.jpg
 

greenscoe

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Graham McDonald: looks like you have been busy! Some great looking instruments. I know you say that its all being documented for a book but it would be good if you would post more on the forum. Its always interesting to see what others are making and to get the benefit of other builders experience.
 
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Graham McDonald: looks like you have been busy! Some great looking instruments. I know you say that its all being documented for a book but it would be good if you would post more on the forum. Its always interesting to see what others are making and to get the benefit of other builders experience.

The last few months have been very much a learning experience with lots of trial and error as I try to work out a logical and systematic approach to building and explaining the processes. I have published a couple of books on mandolin family instruments, so I think I understand the way to go about explaining the processes in words and images, but I have lots to learn about the way ukuleles work. After more than 35 years of making expensive sawdust, there is always so much more to learn and I will try to be more active on the forum.

Cheers
 

orangeena

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Trying to finish my first Baritone, built using a form I made for making a ubass. It is hand cut walnut front and back, mahog sides and an ash neck. I left the end of the headstock a bit 'wainy' as I like to be pretentious if possible.
Max

polished_baritone.jpg
 

Timbuck

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I been making this customer ordered 7 point gauge today..Love metalwork for a change, getting away from all that nasty sawdust. :)

PICT0085 by Ken Timms, on Flickr