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Thread: Explosion Proof Fans and home spray booth set up

  1. #1
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    Default Explosion Proof Fans and home spray booth set up

    Hi,
    Can anyone recommend any info on a cheap explosion proof fan- I'm setting up a spray booth and am in need of any tips.

    thanks

  2. #2
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    At about $650, this is the most reasonable I've found. However, the fan needs to be hard wired into your shop's electricity supply, so add the cost of an electrician.

  3. #3
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    Bilge blower off of ebay. Good luck getting the right power supply for one, though. I tried and ended up using a non-explosion proof fan (a duct boost fan). Having spoken to some local pros about it, they kinda laughed when I told them what I was doing (roughly three minutes at a time spraying a fine spray of nitrocellulose. They said with the fan running concentrations would never build up enough to be an issue even if there was a spark. I do not recommend that for anyone else, though, as I do not want to be responsible for any harm coming to anyone doing this, and I will continue to try to get the bilge blower fan I bought running. I'm going to take it into an old school electrician shop here, see what they can figure out. I tried some LED power supplies that fit the bill on paper, but all they would do in fact was make the motor pulse, on and off, every second. I can touch the fan's leads to a 9 volt and it runs fine, though.

  4. #4
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    We use them here at my job where they are kept near 1000 gal tanks of stain. The ones we bought were around $650 and they are on pedastals, http://www.globalindustrial.com/sear...sion+proof+fan

    We make paint and stain and have to have them in our explosion proof manufacturing room. Whats funny is after 17 years working here we never had explosion proof anything in that room until SW bought us out, dumped money into us and then decided to close us down at the end of the month. I wish I could take a couple of those fans home with me they are pretty sweet.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Beau Hannam Ukuleles View Post
    Hi,
    Can anyone recommend any info on a cheap explosion proof fan- I'm setting up a spray booth and am in need of any tips.

    thanks
    Gonna start doing your own finishing? Great. I imagine your clients would be willing to kick in a few dollars for a fan, to hurry the turnaround-time sending 'em out ...

  6. #6
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    Beyond an explosion proof fan, and even more important from a standpoint of accomplishing a good finish, you need a plan to be sure that the big exhaust fan is not stirring up or bringing dust into the spray area. Creating a positive pressure spray booth, with downdraft HEPA filtered air is a good plan.

    'Cheap' and 'explosion proof' are not likely, unless you can find a small used one.

    Since you are finishing small numbers of small instruments, you could probably get creative in your overall plan to make a good spray environment, and at the same time be pretty safe.

    Filtered air is important, otherwise you may be endlessly dealing with dust particles in your finish.

  7. #7
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    Here's the spray booth I recently put together in my basement. It's built of 2x3s, firring strips, some particle board for the floor and some for the ceiling, and six mil plastic held in place with duct tape and staples. There's a door with an allergy grade furnace filter stuck in it and weather sealing around the edges. The vent fan is outside the booth and connects to a "vent box" inside the booth. The vent box has room for two filters, too. I'm currently only running one in it. Need to find a source for 10 x 20 furnace filters that aren't allergen grade for the vent box. With just one, though, when I have the door closed and turn the fan on (as I do in these pictures) you can visibly see the plastic suck into the booth some what.
    http://i.imgur.com/YTtsst9.jpg

    Here's a shot of the door. The light source is outside the booth, too and shines down through the ceiling/6 mil plastic.

    http://i.imgur.com/fViA3ZE.jpg

    The sprayer (still running the Earlex) is also outside the booth.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steveperrywriter View Post
    Gonna start doing your own finishing? Great. I imagine your clients would be willing to kick in a few dollars for a fan, to hurry the turnaround-time sending 'em out ...
    I just received my new Fuji Q4 which i got for $675 (instead of $1000) so i hope to be finishing my own stuff but i don't want to start that until i can have a simple but safe and dust free booth (for the reasons Chris mentioned- dust contamination) -
    I think ill be making something very similar to Matt Clara's pics- ie- a Dexter kill room with a safe fan

    ps- this Q4 is really quiet and i cant wait to use it!!!!

  9. #9
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    Seriously, check out bilge blower fans. They're made to vent diesel fumes from the bilge of a boat. http://www.ebay.com/itm/New-Marine-4...-/400309135144 That one's 240 CFM, which should be plenty, but if not, get two, a Y connector and step the duct from 4 to 8 inches. Plenty of people talk about running them on ac/dc converters, I just had bad luck and I'm impatient.

    PS. pm me the contact info for the super secret Q4 deal you got!

  10. #10
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    If you must have a spray booth in your home (I personally wouldn't because insurance isn't going to be easy to get and its dangerous), get a big enough explosion proof motor and set up where you are moving lots of air, like a squirrel cage house fan does. You should pulling as much air into the booth as you are moving out. The air source for removing the lacquer spray should be near the ground. Gets lots of filters and change them often. Lacquer particulates are heavy once sprayed will fall to the floor and stick to the walls creating lots of visible dust which is like gun powder once it is dried. Make sure all sparking electrical sources are no where near the lacquer, wet or dried, at any time, ever. Good luck if you still want to do this.

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