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Thread: G9 = Dm6

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    Default G9 = Dm6

    This thread is probably for geeks only but isn't it interesting that a 9 chord for any key is voiced the same as the minor6 for the fifth in that key? For instance, G9 = Dm6 in terms of voicing. I think the effect is particularly strong on uke.

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    Quote Originally Posted by fuller View Post
    This thread is probably for geeks only but isn't it interesting that a 9 chord for any key is voiced the same as the minor6 for the fifth in that key? For instance, G9 = Dm6 in terms of voicing. I think the effect is particularly strong on uke.

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    and no, I don't know what I meant by that.
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    Quote Originally Posted by fuller View Post
    This thread is probably for geeks only but isn't it interesting that a 9 chord for any key is voiced the same as the minor6 for the fifth in that key? For instance, G9 = Dm6 in terms of voicing. I think the effect is particularly strong on uke.
    Isn't it more accurate to say that the notes are the same but the voicings are different? In any case, you can add Bm7b5 to the party.
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    Dm6 contains the same notes as Bm7b5. G9 is slightly different.

    Dm6 = D, F, A, B
    Bm7b5 = B, D, F. A
    G9 = G, B, D, F, A

    Now, you can see that G9 has 5 notes in it but a uke only has 4 strings. What do we do about that? Normally you miss the root (G) out. This is often explained by saying that the bass player will play the root. That is often true, but it still works when playing solo. What happens then, I think, is that the listener's brain plays the root.

    In any case it's pretty cool. Three chords for the price of one!

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    I concur....

    1 + 3 = 4 as does a + b = c.

    Thanks for getting me on the right track!

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    Quote Originally Posted by cpatch View Post
    Isn't it more accurate to say that the notes are the same but the voicings are different? In any case, you can add Bm7b5 to the party.

    Maybe that would be more accurate. But I guess what I'm really trying to get at is not the general fact that those chords are built of the same notes but more specifically that the string to string relationships within a particular chord shape can be experienced as either the 9 or the m6 depending on the musical context For me it's more about the different feelings that are coming through even though it's the same sound happening. I'm sure I'm not first to mention this but the 9 and m6 (and dims, obviously) always make for a great way to add tension to transitional moments... I think your brain recognizes that the melody suddenly has the potential to go in a few different directions.

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