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Thread: Meaty hands and muted chords, lol.

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
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    Default Meaty hands and muted chords, lol.

    New player here with a Rubin Zebrawood Tenor.
    I'm having a problem when I make some chords and the fleshy flap of skin ( I have big hands, not chunky) just below the fingers touches the A string and mutes it.
    I've noticed on the Rubin nut that the A string slot is a bit closer to the side than the G string slot.
    So questions:

    Is this a normal problem?

    Something I'm just going to have to practice on?

    Are there uke brands that have slightly 'wider' necks and fretboards?

    Otherwise, very happy with this uke, everyone is impressed with it's sound.
    Last edited by Samhain; 05-19-2015 at 02:52 PM.

  2. #2
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    Mar 2014
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    Default

    I can't visualize a fleshy flap of skin, so I'm not sure what is going on, but I have large hands too, and if I get sloppy and start wrapping my thumb around the neck, I will sometimes mute a string, or two strings, or all of them. Maybe try keeping the thumb toward the back of the neck. You will get more arch in your fingers.
    Last edited by Rllink; 05-19-2015 at 05:10 AM.
    I don't want to live in a world that is linear.

    I just want everyone to understand that I am not a ukulele expert, even though it may look at times like I'm pretending to be.

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  3. #3
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    Jan 2009
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    Default

    To a great degree, "correct practice" will minimize that problem. Yes, there are some ukes that have slightly larger necks. The standard width is 1 3/8" approximate with some going up to 1 1/2". Search YouTube for "ukulele, how to finger chords, etc. etc. to see how others do it. In the end, most players end up doing what works best for them. Get to a club if you can and you will have a whole group of people to observe and help you.

  4. #4
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    Pickering, ON, Canada
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    Default

    If this is your first attempt at learning to play a stringed instrument then you are experiencing what we all did at the start. This is a common problem and as others have said correct technique will eliminate the issue. There are lots of accomplished players with really big meaty hands.

    If you are grasping the uke too tight and have the back of the neck flat against your palm your fingers cannot arch high enough to avoid muting or touching the other strings. As Rliink said slide your thumb down the neck, this will help create more space. Get a strap, it will support the uke instead of your hand doing that and fretting at the same time
    Currently enjoying these ukuleles : *LdfM tenor, *LfdM 19" super tenor. *LfdM baritone, *I'iwi tenor , *Koolau tenor, *Webber tenor, *Kimo tenor, *Kimo super concert, *Mya Moe baritone, *Kamaka baritone, *Gianinni baritone, *Fred Shields super soprano, *Kala super soprano, *Loprinzi super soprano, *Black bear ULO concert , *Enya X1 concert, *Enya X1 pineapple soprano, *Gretsch tenor, *Korala plastic concert

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
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    2

    Default

    Thnks all for the quick replies and great advice.
    Quote Originally Posted by Rllink View Post
    I can't visualize a fleshy flap of skin, so I'm not sure what is going on, but I have large hands too, and if I get sloppy and start wrapping my thumb around the neck, I will sometimes mute a string, or two strings, or all of them. Maybe try keeping the thumb toward the back of the neck. You will get more arch in your fingers.
    That helps for sure.

    Quote Originally Posted by PhilUSAFRet View Post
    To a great degree, "correct practice" will minimize that problem. Yes, there are some ukes that have slightly larger necks. The standard width is 1 3/8" approximate with some going up to 1 1/2". Search YouTube for "ukulele, how to finger chords, etc. etc. to see how others do it. In the end, most players end up doing what works best for them. Get to a club if you can and you will have a whole group of people to observe and help you.
    Yeah, I've been looking for a club and think I may have found one.
    Quote Originally Posted by DownUpDave View Post
    If this is your first attempt at learning to play a stringed instrument then you are experiencing what we all did at the start. This is a common problem and as others have said correct technique will eliminate the issue. There are lots of accomplished players with really big meaty hands.

    If you are grasping the uke too tight and have the back of the neck flat against your palm your fingers cannot arch high enough to avoid muting or touching the other strings. As Rliink said slide your thumb down the neck, this will help create more space. Get a strap, it will support the uke instead of your hand doing that and fretting at the same time
    Yep first attempt with any strings, did get a strap, which definitely helps....I think part of the problem is I broke my left arm twice and once was in the wrist so I don't have the movement in it that I should and some chords are slightly painful to do, but I will continue to practice them and work through it.

    Putting my thumb to the back has helped and also a video I watched as a result of this thread, showed how the guy "drops" his wrist, which has really given me the space and finger curving I needed.

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