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Thread: Roland Microcube GUITAR Amp and U Bass?

  1. #1
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    Default Roland Microcube GUITAR Amp and U Bass?

    Has anyone used a U Bass and the guitar microcube with decent results? I am looking to buy a microcube to use with a guitar, concert uke and the U Bass. Given that the Microcube RX Bass amp is five watts, i don't see much difference between the two amps. Again, I am looking to hear from someone who has run a U Bass through a guitar microcube, and your impression.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
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    The microcube will be fine with the guitar & uke, but not the UBass.


    Quote Originally Posted by ohiopicker View Post
    Has anyone used a U Bass and the guitar microcube with decent results? I am looking to buy a microcube to use with a guitar, concert uke and the U Bass. Given that the Microcube RX Bass amp is five watts, i don't see much difference between the two amps. Again, I am looking to hear from someone who has run a U Bass through a guitar microcube, and your impression.

    Thanks!

  3. #3
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    How about a Pignose Hog 20 or Hog 30? Thanks.

  4. #4

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    Any small guitar amp will be marginal with the U-Bass. I do sometimes use a ZT Lunchbox Jr with my U-Bass. It can be powered by any one of a number of those phone charging external batteries (or by their external battery pack). I don't like the Roland Microcube guitar or Bass RX. I sold my Bass RX. I don't like the Yamaha Thr series with bass.

    My go to portable bass amp is the Phil Jones Double Four with an external battery. It is excellent, but pricey. But it is a real bass amp and sounds great with a fair amount of power. If I just need a little bit of amplification and extreme portability I use the lunchbox Jr. The guitar microcube doesn't really have a speaker to handle bass, but the bass RX does and still sounds bad.

  5. #5
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    My problem is I don't want to wrap up more than $150.00 for a battery/ac amp for it. It will be played with a Roland AC33 (guitar or uke) in either a campground setting or line in to a stick PA . That is why I thought a low power amp might be sufficient (even if barely).

  6. #6

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    The biggest problem I have with the Roland amps is that they tend to have a diffuse sound and don't have any "cut" to them. My experience with them outdoors is that the sound diffuses so much that when you turn it up loud enough even to hear the bass (not even to have the bass loud) that the sound distorts so horribly that it can't be used. I find that the lunchbox junior has more "cut". My problem with the Yamaha is that the sound tends to break up on the bass notes. A lot of people have used the Pignose outdoors so that might be OK.

  7. #7

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    Any time you run an instrument which produces lower frequencies (ubass, electric bass, keyboard, drums, mic'd tuba, etc) through a guitar amp, you risk blowing the speaker. The electronics can usually handle the lower frequencies just fine, but the speakers were designed for frequency range of the guitar, which does not go that low. So the result is that the electronics can produce low frequency volume that the speaker can't handle. No doubt, plenty of people will tell you they have done it without problem (I do it frequently, but I keep the volume down, and I'm using a crappy amp that I won't care if I damage), but it is a serious risk. Plus, the sound will usually be pretty lame. You really need a bass amp for quality sound.

  8. #8
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    When I frist started playing bass uke about a year ago with a Gold Tone GT MicroBass, I used my Crate Limo combo amp that I bought for my guitars 15 years ago for $350; 50 watts, lead acid battery, two inputs and effects. It was fine for smaller gigs, but had it's limitations for bass. I then went with a Phil Jones Double Four, as Katysax mentioned, more expensive but great. The other bass player in our group uses a Kala U-Bass, Pyramid strings, with a Pig Nose Hog and as long as he does not push the volume, it's pretty good.
    Last edited by kohanmike; 10-30-2015 at 08:10 PM.

  9. #9

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    With modern speakers, the lower frequency should not damage them. You'll damage any speaker if you push it too hard. However, guitar amps aren't made to handle the low frequencies so they just don't sound that good. Some do better than others, but to get the full spectrum of sound you need a bass amp.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by katysax View Post
    With modern speakers, the lower frequency should not damage them. You'll damage any speaker if you push it too hard. However, guitar amps aren't made to handle the low frequencies so they just don't sound that good. Some do better than others, but to get the full spectrum of sound you need a bass amp.
    I hear what you are saying, but based on my hearing samples of amplified Ubass, I does not appear that there is much "depth" to the notes. That is the reason it seems hard to believe a Ubass would damage a guitar amp. Conversely, it seems hard to believe a bass amp would make a huge difference in producing both the fundamentals and the harmonic overtones of a Ubass.

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