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Thread: Totally new builder already in trouble

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    23

    Default Totally new builder already in trouble

    Thank everyone on this forum for the wealth of information posted here. I have been reading and following in the background for a few months and decided to try a build with a Hana Lima tenor kit. All was going well, back and soundboard thickness down to .069, neck scarf joint cut and glued up, braces and tone bars cut, sanded and shaped. Built a go-bar deck, glued up the enharmonic bars. All was fine until I glued the bridge patch and clamped with go-bars. When I removed the go bars I found that the bridge patch had cocked about 1/4 inch from horizontal. I'm not sure what the impact is and thought about trying to remove and reglue the patch but am not confident enough that I won't damage the soundboard. My thought now is leave it cocked and just notch the tone bars appropriately. Any and all of your thoughts would be appreciated.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Cairns, Australia
    Posts
    2,458

    Default

    Well, if it was me, I'd replace it.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Grand Junction, Colorado
    Posts
    2,967

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Allen View Post
    Well, if it was me, I'd replace it.
    yer- just plane/chisel/sand it off and glue on a new one.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    So. Oregon
    Posts
    1,817

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Allen View Post
    Well, if it was me, I'd replace it.
    Me too. Building instruments provides endless opportunities to experience the humbling sensation of having painted oneself into a corner.

    If I'm correctly envisioning your problem, you ought to be able to remove the patch by shaving it down with a sharp chisel. There's no reason that this should adversely affect your build structurally or tonally.

    When you glue down the replacement plate, consider sprinkling a few grains of sand on the glue before you put the piece in place. This will keep it from sliding when you put the go-bars in place to clamp it. It only takes a few grains: think 10 or fewer.

  5. #5

    Default

    I agree with others removing a glued up element is an important basic skill. I would shave it off with a hand plane and put on another.
    Michael Smith
    Goat Rock Ukulele
    www.goatrockukulele.com

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    23

    Default

    Unbelievable reposes (and quick). Removing and replacing it is! Thank you all. This is a great experience for me and I'm looking forward to the whole process. I used to be a cruising sailer and totally enjoyed new destinations but the voyage was definitely half the fun.

    Cheers

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Grand Junction, Colorado
    Posts
    2,967

    Default

    When i screw up, i try to trick myself into doing anything other then just re doing it-
    After a few hours I realise there is no way out of some things and it has to be redone.
    Now, i skip the double guessing myself and just redo it straight away- I know it hurts, but then it feels better.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Kimberley BC Canada
    Posts
    29

    Default

    Maybe use salt instead of sand. It won't hurt your plane iron if, by chance , the patch moves again.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    118

    Default

    I'm halfway into my first build, also. Last Saturday, I glued the back braces on and the one on the upper bout had enough play to not be at 90 degrees to the center line. I am being taught by a seasoned luthier and I asked him what he thought when I returned today to start in again. He said I could just leave it, as it wasn't too far off; or I could replace it. Well, I decided it would bother me to have it off; so we got out a sharp chisel and started to remove the crooked brace. As I was chiseling away, I asked, "Is this the first time anyone has chiseled off a back brace in this shop?"

    His reply was one to remember. He said, "Nothing is a first time in this shop," and he gave a knowing smile. I felt better, lol.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Kapolei, Hawaii
    Posts
    1,869

    Default

    Mike Chock once told me early on its not how good you can make an instrument (anybody can do that), its how good you cover up the mistakes.

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