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Thread: The Logical Next Step

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by 70sSanO View Post
    I think most people adapt to the lack of room on the fretboard. Some people find that they need to adapt the size of their ukulele (scale) and get a concert or tenor. You need to work through the chords with a soprano and have some proficiency so if you try a larger size ukulele you will know if it will help or not.

    If you have a chance to see youtubes of John King (RIP), it is pretty amazing what can be done on a soprano. It is beyond what most ukulele players can do on any scale.

    John
    I'll look him up.

    Quote Originally Posted by PhilUSAFRet View Post
    If possible for you, next logical step for me was to join a local uke club. Otherwise, lost of video tutorials/lessons online incuding those here on UU. I generally don't recommend how to books until you know exactly what you want to learn, which book you need, why you need it, and some understanding of how it will fulfill that need.
    No local uke clubs, not even in the next bigger city, at least not that I can find online. I've been watching some videos online, but we have limited internet where we live so I can't watch a ton, sadly. Although it does seem to be going faster today...

    Quote Originally Posted by sukie View Post
    It will come.
    It's nice to be able to finger chords in different ways. What fingering I use depends on what comes next. I have found if I finger D with 3 fingers instead of one I will get a better tone. My fun goal is to learn the goofy E chord, not the easy ones.
    Yeah, I'll definitely need to learn alternate versions. Some of my favorite fingerings on the oboe were the weird ones that most other people didn't use, but they felt good to me!

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Twibbly View Post
    My problem with D is stacking my fingers together that tightly!
    You can use just one finger for D major, too. Petey went over numerous ways of playing D, depending on where you come from and where you want to go in the song:



    As for Ukulele Aerobics, I really like it, and if I could only have one book, that would be it. The key is to look at the weekly exercises as study units, not as something you must have mastered or even completed within a week for each set. If you try to do one set per week, the book will overwhelm you and leave you in the dust within a few weeks. But as learning unis, the sets are fantastic because they build upon each other and cover a wide area. It's not a flawless book, but it's the one book I feel every improver can greatly benefit from without having to focus on one specific area.

    I'd recommend against getting too many books. I did this, and I don't feel it was a good approach for the first year of learning.

    I think trying to play songs with D and D7 in your first week, could mean you're going too fast, too.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mivo View Post
    I'd recommend against getting too many books. I did this, and I don't feel it was a good approach for the first year of learning.

    I think trying to play songs with D and D7 in your first week, could mean you're going too fast, too.
    I'll watch that video once I have my headphones. I should probably keep just going with the book I have on Kindle (Ukulele for the Complete Ignoramus), but the songs quit amusing me because they're using a bunch I've never heard, so I started looking for songs I do know...
    Last edited by Twibbly; 03-03-2016 at 12:28 PM.

  4. #24
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    I think having fun and enjoying yourself is more important than following a study plan anyway. But I still often wish I had one, because it's so easy to flop around all over the place if you learn aimlessly.

    Petey's videos are all fantastic. He's both a good showman and a gifted teacher, as well as an excellent player. I'm always thrilled when I want to learn something and he's got a video up on the subject.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mivo View Post
    I think having fun and enjoying yourself is more important than following a study plan anyway. But I still often wish I had one, because it's so easy to flop around all over the place if you learn aimlessly.

    Petey's videos are all fantastic. He's both a good showman and a gifted teacher, as well as an excellent player. I'm always thrilled when I want to learn something and he's got a video up on the subject.
    Yeah, I decided that I better figure out how to teach myself at least the basics, because while I might end up mostly strumming, I still want to know where the notes are and the book I was using wasn't really giving me that. I went to Hastings and picked up Hal Leonard's Ukulele Method 1 book. I figure I can spend a week deliberating over which book on Amazon is best, or I can just go to the store and find something that does well enough and start playing.

    I'm about to watch it, as our internet seems to be cooperating this morning.

  6. #26
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    If you haven't already, download a fingerboard map.

    This site may also be of interest, http://www.gotaukulele.com/p/ukulele-chord-charts.html
    Trying to do justice to various musical instruments.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by uke1950 View Post
    On those chord charts, what do the open circles mean? (Like on Dm7?)
    Are those alternate fingerings, or do I need to use 8 fingers at the same time?

  8. #28
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    They look like alternative fingerings to me.

    If you check them against the fingerboard map, I think you will find they are the same notes played on different frets.

    Trying to do justice to various musical instruments.

  9. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by Twibbly View Post
    I have a musical background in practically everything but strings (piano, oboe, bass drum, mallets, Xaphoon, etc.), so I can read music, count rhythms, etc.

    I'm working through Ukulele for the Complete Ignoramus on my Kindle, but feel that it may not keep me interested for too much longer. I have Uncle Rod's Bootcamp downloaded, printed, and am playing with the first page of it. I have The Daily Ukulele and can find plenty of music to play.

    Other than practice, practice, practice, and quit looking too far ahead, what would be the logical next step to improve skill-wise once I've gone through Ukulele for the Complete Ignoramus and Uncle Rod's Bootcamp?

    Also, can you play guitar tabs on a ukulele just fine? Because if so, I think I may have enough Disney music to last a lifetime. My oboe teacher in high school had me play Scales and Arpeggios from Aristocats to get me to practice my scales and arpeggios, if that tells you anything.
    I play a few different instruments as well, including Xaphoon.

    I have found very few good Xaphoon videos which involved any kind of ensemble playing (plenty of solo vids). The instrument can't be tuned at all, so I have to retune other instruments to match, kind of a pain.

    How is your overall music theory knowledge? I would strongly suggest you learn about how to construct chords. Once you understand the theory, you can easily modify fingerings to help you.

    Yes you can use guitar tabs on a uke just fine, for chords. However, you will have transposed the music up a fourth, and the voicings will be a bit different, because the fourth string notes will be an octave higher. For example, the D7 tab from a guitar book becomes a G7 on a uke with a slightly different sound (the root is raised an octave). If you are playing single note lines, again you're up a fourth, but now that higher fourth string can be problematic. You'd probably just be better off reading standard notation.
    Last edited by bookoo; 03-14-2016 at 02:48 PM.

  10. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by Down Up Dick View Post
    Yes, it is nice to know that I'm not the only anti-tabber. Now, if I only had some way to memorize stuff.
    I have been SAVAGELY attacked on other forums for suggesting that people learn how to read music.

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