Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 24

Thread: Waverly Friction tuning pegs - REVIEW

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    4,526

    Default Waverly Friction tuning pegs - REVIEW

    Quite simply - brilliant

    I do love good quality friction pegs!

    http://www.gotaukulele.com/2016/06/w...gs-review.html
    The GOT A UKULELE REVIEWS DATABASE!

    Help Support Got A Ukulele!



    Ukes include (!) Kanile'a K1 Tenor, Tinguitar custom solid tenor, Fluke, Flea, Tinguitar Reclaimed Mahogany soprano, KM Ukuleles Dreadnought Concert

  2. #2

    Default

    Thanks for the review Baz.

    Are these pegs really nice and easy enough to justify the price?

    That's has been putting me off trying them since the cheaper Grover pegs, even the Champion ones are a real PITA for me, and after trying a few different types of Grovers, had to swear off friction pegs, and go either to geared tuners, the Gotoh UPT, or the Pegheds instead, depending upon the uke....

    With the cheaper pegs, the herky-jerky movements for adjusting and the too-tight/too-loose hysteresis is a frustration I need to avoid. The cheaper pegs seems to rely upon compression of the plastic button for applying tension, and therefore friction to the metal parts that either contact other metal parts or plastic or delrin washers in some magical layers to make it turn smoothly, but I found that even on sopranos, when I got the peg to turn smoothly, it would then slip, and when it was tight enough not to slip, it was VERY hard to turn, and this is with trying the adjustment screw in as little as 1/8-rotation increments....
    Guinea proverb: "A cow that has no tail should not try to chase away flies."

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    Upper Hale, Surrey/Hants border, UK.
    Posts
    6,188

    Default

    I have to admit that I avoid friction tuners in favour of geared - I simply don't trust them.
    Trying to do justice to various musical instruments.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    4,526

    Default

    @Booli - personally - if it wasn't for the fact I bought these for a small ukulele headstock - no - I would stick with Grovers myself - they are wonderful though!

    @Uke1950 - in my experience there is much not to trust about cheap friction pegs. Never had any issue with high quality friction pegs. Unfortunately I find that the cheap pegs tend to give the good quality pegs a bad name - unfairly.
    The GOT A UKULELE REVIEWS DATABASE!

    Help Support Got A Ukulele!



    Ukes include (!) Kanile'a K1 Tenor, Tinguitar custom solid tenor, Fluke, Flea, Tinguitar Reclaimed Mahogany soprano, KM Ukuleles Dreadnought Concert

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    Upper Hale, Surrey/Hants border, UK.
    Posts
    6,188

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bazmaz View Post
    @Uke1950 - in my experience there is much not to trust about cheap friction pegs. Never had any issue with high quality friction pegs. Unfortunately I find that the cheap pegs tend to give the good quality pegs a bad name - unfairly.
    Where would you rate Grover 4W tuners?
    Trying to do justice to various musical instruments.

  6. #6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bazmaz View Post
    @Booli - personally - if it wasn't for the fact I bought these for a small ukulele headstock - no - I would stick with Grovers myself - they are wonderful though!

    @Uke1950 - in my experience there is much not to trust about cheap friction pegs. Never had any issue with high quality friction pegs. Unfortunately I find that the cheap pegs tend to give the good quality pegs a bad name - unfairly.
    Thanks for the reply Baz

    I agree about the cheap ones, they really burned me on friction pegs from the start. Having a completlely painless experience with both the Gotoh UPT and Pegheds (one set of each installed on different ukes), which are priced around $60-70 USD, it's hard for me to justify spending $50+ on high-end friction pegs...given the torture I've had with the cheap friction pegs.

    I need to get hands-on with a decent set of the Waverly's or similar, before I would commit to buying them, but I DO like the fact that the Waverly buttons are so small.
    Guinea proverb: "A cow that has no tail should not try to chase away flies."

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Yakima, WA
    Posts
    1,635

    Default

    One of the major problems with bad performing fiction tuners, cheap or expensive that I have found over the years, is that they were installed poorly. Even cheaper friction tuners can turn smoothly and perform well is they are installed with the correct size hole in the peg head, and care taken to not over adjust the tension.

  8. #8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BlackBearUkes View Post
    One of the major problems with bad performing fiction tuners, cheap or expensive that I have found over the years, is that they were installed poorly. Even cheaper friction tuners can turn smoothly and perform well is they are installed with the correct size hole in the peg head, and care taken to not over adjust the tension.
    In my case, I never had the option for the initial hole size, as some friction tuners were either pre-installed into a 7.5mm hole as it came with the uke, or was a retrofit done by me, also into a pre-existing 7.5mm hole, originaly used by either crappy friction tuners, or geared tuners.

    Seems like they all make the hole wide enough for the bushing, without caring about the width of the tuner shaft, and without having a stepped-width diameter inside the hole. It may be wrong, but that is what I would do.

    With the hole on the headstock face, stepped wider to accommodate the bushing, and then thinner out to the shaft with the proper chamfer or countersink for the button-end tapered-bit of the shaft to bite into the wood...but I am no luthier

    With the retrofit/installation of the Gotoh UPT tuners on my concert Flea, I hand-turned a UniBit down to an 8.5mm diameter hole, and then they slid right in and tightened down easy.
    Guinea proverb: "A cow that has no tail should not try to chase away flies."

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Juneau, Alaska
    Posts
    151

    Default

    +1 on the Waverly's. I had an aversion to friction tuners based on reading what I now consider uninformed commentary "just touch them and they go out of tune" in an early Ukulele magazine.
    Then I was able to obtain a beat up Gibson almost 90 years old, and with nothing more than tightening the adjustment screws, those worked smoothly and held perfectly, as well as any geared tuners. Those look exactly the same as the current Waverlys, so I bought Waverly's thinking I'd need to replace them but ended up using them for the uke I made for myself.
    Once you have a little practice with firmly turning just a tiny amount, friction tuners can be quicker to tune and especially changing strings.

    Advantages for first time build design:
    - the hole required is very small, so you're not weakening the headstock as much as with four larger holes.
    - no screw holes, so if you ever want to replace with geared or anything else, there is nothing to fill or cover up.
    - much lighter than geared, almost no chance of getting a neck-heavy imbalance.
    -those above apply to other friction tuners, but - tensioning evened out by a spring, compressed by the adjustment screw in an advantage of the waverly design.

    The important thing on iinstallation is that the angle of chamfer is different on the top and bottom, so get the special angle countersink bit from Stemac or elsewhere - which is only for one not both of these angles - and pay attention to your angle of countersink on the other side for a good fit and maximum contact for smoothness and holding.

    Now I wish I had these on some other ukes.

    -Vinnie in Juneau

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Apollo, PA
    Posts
    524

    Default

    I personally like the Grover 4's. They dropped right into the headstock of an early 70s Kamaka I had bought that
    had useless tuners. I did not want to do any drilling and by replacing the bushings with a small stainless washer
    they work perfectly and look great. Martin also uses them on their Mexican ukes that use friction tuners.
    My 4-String Family:
    Kamoa E3 Pineapple Soprano
    Martin S-O (given to my brother for Christmas with the stipulation he learns to play it)
    Early-70s Kamaka Soprano
    KPK Acacia Concert (given to a friend for his birthday because he wanted to learn to play ukulele)
    KPK Deluxe Long Neck Acacia Pineapple Soprano
    Gretsch Concert Resonator
    Lanikai O-8 Spruce/Ovangkol 8 String Tenor
    and various guitars

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •