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Thread: Cedar/Brazilian Tenor

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
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    Default Cedar/Brazilian Tenor

    It's been a little while, but I'm finally building another uke.
    This one has a cedar soundboard and Brazilian back and sides. The back is arched/braceless with a carbon fiber core (borrowed from my classical guitar construction technique). The head features a recessed panel which is another thing I've been doing on my guitars.

    Should be done soon!

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  2. #2
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  3. #3
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    Default

    Reverse fan bracing. European spruce.
    16142756_10154093534855966_3545432064645193872_n.jpg

  4. #4
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    Oct 2014
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    Default

    Very nice work. Love the rosette.... Not familiar with reverse fan bracing. No bridge patch?

  5. #5
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    I used a bridge patch for several years on my guitars, because that's what my teacher did. Now I've come to the conclusion that they aren't helpful.... at least in classical guitars. Used on a uke, where there's even less soundboard area and stored energy in a string, I can't see how a bridge patch could do anything but add weight; thereby decreasing responsiveness. We want to get that soundboard moving!

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jason Wolverton View Post
    I can't see how a bridge patch could do anything but add weight; thereby decreasing responsiveness. We want to get that soundboard moving!
    I think about this question a lot and I follow your thinking about getting that soundboard moving, but what about bridge rotation over time? Without a foundation like a bridge patch that bridge is going to rotate on your soundboard due to the pressure of the strings. Thus your calculated scale length and added compensation is going to change over the years and eventually the uke is going to change and the scale length is going to shorten. Unless! You reinforce that area underneath with braces... I still have not figured this part out. Until such time as I do, I will continue to use bridge patches.

  7. #7
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    My belief is that a bar under the bridge will do a lot more to halt soundboard deflection than a pad will. Anyhow, there's more than one way to skin a cat as they say...

  8. #8
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    Default

    A couple more photos of the progress.
    IMG_7801.jpg
    IMG_7804.jpg

  9. #9
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    Mar 2014
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    Default

    Brazilian rosewood? I've never seen a piece with such contrast in the sap wood before. Looks like beautiful stuff.

    Question on the braceless back; Is it a sandwich of wood/carbon fiber sheet/wood? How thick is the carbon fiber?

    Also, your rosette is really stunning. What material is the field for the half dots made of? End grain black palm?

  10. #10
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    Yessir, the center is Black Palm. Thanks for your compliments.

    Correct on the sandwich. I make the two outer skins about 1.2 mm. The carbon fiber cloth is pretty thin, and gets compressed a little when I put in in the vacuum. The final thickness is about 2.75 mm. I do this frequently on a larger bodied classical guitar design that I make. First time trying it out on a ukulele.... Just to amuse myself and see what happens.

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