Page 61 of 62 FirstFirst ... 115159606162 LastLast
Results 601 to 610 of 614

Thread: my ukulele progress

  1. #601
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Posts
    1,646

    Default

    Evening time. I made black beans with curry, roasted daikon, rice, and collard greens with yellow peppers and olives.

    Musically, I was feeling lazy. Previously I was working on imbricating 9 chords with 9 chord arpeggios in a blues progression context. But I didn't want to think, so I just fell back on a twelve bar jazz progression:

    01: E13
    02. A9
    03. E13
    04. E13
    05. A9
    06. A9
    07. E13 + D#13
    08. D13 + C#13
    09. F#m11
    10. B9
    11. E13 +D#13
    12. F#m11 + B9

    This is a nice progression, but there's room for improvement. For example, the 3rd and 4th bars, as well as the 5th and 6th, could use some movement. Too much time spent on one chord. On the other hand, one chord can do so much, as long as you commit to it aggressively and squeeze the emphasis out of it. And obviously I changed the quality of the II chord. It should be a 13 chord as well, but a 13 chord rooted on the E string is a finger twister. A m11 is so much easier.
    Last edited by ripock; 07-13-2021 at 07:12 PM.

  2. #602
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Posts
    1,646

    Default

    something else I forgot to mention: bar 9--F#, secondary dominant! Remember those from a few posts ago? It is used here to create a stutter toward resolution by means of the II V I cadence that is so ubiquitous. In this progression it goes II V I but then veers of to a bI which is a bit de-stabilizing only to do the true ii V and the turnaround to the I. So it is a bit of a tease.

  3. #603
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Posts
    1,646

    Default

    I saw an old acquaintance browsing the threads. I wonder how closely my dinner would suit his tastes.

    I pressure cooked some rice and set it in the freezer to chill.

    I stir fried 3 eggs, which is an art unto itself in a wok.

    In ghee and coconut oil, I briefly cooked half a bulb of garlic and then I added cabbage and carrots. I topped that with Chinese 5-spice, umami, and ginger.

    Once that had cooked down, I added the eggs and black beans.

    For flavoring I added some soy sauce, sesame oil, and raw leeks.

    The eggs and ghee may be objectionable to a vegan, but I did rather well. And I didn't have wine. I opt for scotch which is less calorically dense.

    And for my post-prandial entertainment, I worked on my Em9 arpeggio. I read that most guitar or piano players frequently omit the flat third or the fifth when playing this arpeggio. I just played it in full: E G B D F#. My plan is to throw this arpeggio into that progression I was playing a few posts ago. The first four bars are too boring. It would be better to go: E13, A9 for a quick change, Em9 arpeggio, E13. The 5th and 6th bars are again too static. I like some movement in my 5th and 6th bars. I think I'll change to Am and Am add9. That will add some movement before we get to the descending chromaticism of the next section.

  4. #604
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Posts
    1,646

    Default

    More food for my suppositious guest. I had some pressure cooked sweet potatoes mixed with some ghee, black strap molasses, cinnamon, brown sugar. I had some kale eaten with infused olive oil and balsamic vinegar, black beans and basmati rice cooked with some New Mexican staples: oregano, garlic, lime, cumin, green chilis.

    I felt like playing high on the fretboard so I played around with B Phrygian Dominant on the 16th fret and the D# Super Lokrian bb7 on the 15th fret. I connected some of the ideas I had with apreggios like the m9 and the A dim7.

  5. #605
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Posts
    1,646

    Default

    Sheesh, there is a seven-page thread about the tone-rite accessory. I have to speculate. What if everyone spent as much time learning to read music or learn some rudimentary theory? It would be a much better world and they'd be much better musicians.

    As for me I have been playing the high frets once again. This time I am using my pentatonic shapes.

    In reference to my custom baritone that I am bespeaking, I have sent the luthier some wood choices as well as my philosophy on instrument necks.

    At this point, I think I have had one too many scotch & bitter drinks. I am slightly loopy. Time to call it a night and strum first position chords.

  6. #606
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Posts
    1,646

    Default

    Today I wanted a bit of a change. I went to random.org and randomized a number for which interval for me to try out. I obtained the second interval.

    Playing in E as I do, that means F#. In many ways I find F# rather awkward. In the past I could not decide on whether to call it F# or Gb when playing in that key. In communication, the goal is communication and not obfuscation, so you always go the easier path when communicating in general or musically. For example you don’t call a key G# because that has 8 sharps whereas Ab the enharmonic equivalent only has 4 flats—much easier. F# on the other hand has 6 sharps and Gb has 6 flats. I read somewhere that most people refer to it as Gb when they compose. However, I am heavily drawn to F#. I think I just like the look of a sharp sign rather than a flat sign.

    F# also occurs awkwardly on the fretboard. The E string is the only place where the F# occurs conveniently low and high on the fretboard.

    First of all, the most obvious thing to do with a second interval is a II-V-I progression. I played around with the major II-V-I and became comfortable with the different voicings for F#m7. I have always disliked the F#m7 rooted on the E string, but it is such a prevalent shape and the E string offers the 2nd or 14rh frets as starting points.

    Of course, the most natural thing is to play the minor II-V-I since that progression is based on the harmonization of the harmonic minor scale...the scale I am currently obsessing on. I’ll do that later. I have always had an issue with the tonic in this progression. It is supposed to be ii(m7b5)-V(7b9)-i(m maj7). I’ve never quite warmed up to the minor major 7 although I love the name. Accordingly I will experiment with other chord qualities to see something that resonates with me. Perhaps if used a tone-rite on myself I could resonate more felicitously with the minor major 7.

    My M.O. is standard, I will play the obvious scale the F# Lokrian 13 and then I will merely be very cognizant of the F# when playing other modes and make it a point to use the F# as a springboard to other modes, so that I create new shapes.

  7. #607
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Posts
    1,646

    Default

    I tend to pair my culinary and musical ratiocinations. Here's the culinary:

    1. I am sold on leeks. I've always steered clear of leeks, anise root, taro root. However there is no reason to fear the leek. It has become my onion of choice. It is so convenient. With regular onions/shallots, you have to convert the bulbs to diced onions. With leeks you just slice them because that are large and cylindrical.

    2. Sauces: I bought some Worchestershire Sauce. I grew up with that sauce but haven't really used it in 20, 30 years. I find it is similar to tamari in a stir fry but it adds a little something with the vinegar and anchovies. Speaking of sauces I needed to buy two of the three sauces that are essential to New Mexican cooking. FYI those are green chili sauce, red chili sauce, and a tomatillo salsa. I know what you're thinking: where's the tomato-based salsa? The answer is that it just isn't essential to our region. If you go to a gentrified "Mexican" restaurant you will find some salsa casera or pico de gallo served with her corn chips as an appetizer. There's nothing wrong with salsa casera, it is just so ubiquitous. It is like a spruce/rosewood instrument: it is functional, it is effective, and it is everywhere. Boooooring. Same thing with salsa casera. You want to deviate from the commonplace in your cooking. But I have to admit there is a bit of a stigma involved here. Salsa Casera is what white colonials expect, so there is some pushback with frustrating Santa Fe Karens.

    3. Aside from the politics of sauces, I have been beleaguered lately with finding a pub. I have been blessed in the pandemic. I worked almost continuously through it. However I had to find a new pub and it hasn't gone well. I am very traditional. I like to go to my pub have some ale on the patio, smoke my pipe, and study ancient poetry or work on ukulele stuff. Now we cannot smoke at my pub. I would understand if it were a health food store. But it is a pub. We go there to inculcate diabetes mellitus by drinking the fermented sugar water. So developing oral cancer simultaneously with diabetes is natural. I've been trying other pubs and they are either way too seedy or full of post-millennial housecats. I just cannot find a place that has my vibe. It is sad but I'll probably just have to give it up as a lost cause and just drink at home.

    4. I did buy some tzatziki sauce for some additional variety, but I am finding it way too rich and full of dairy for my lifestyle. A little bit is good at a restaurant. But to have it small bucket of it at home is excessive.

  8. #608
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Posts
    1,646

    Default

    I just played around with some different things with F#.

    I played Rhythm Changes but in the key of F#. I used that as a backbone of the session and for picking I would play a two-octave arpeggio pattern I made up. By hook or crook, I would end up on the F# on the 9th fret. From there it is easy to play the mode or pentatonic shape.

    I forgot that the re-entrant F# Lokrian 13 is the one shape that doesn't have a corresponding Linear shape. Granted the C and the D# aren't so far away on the G string, but it isn't like playing a re-entrant B Phrygian Dominant which becomes the Linear F# Lokrian 13 as you move horizontally without altering the position.

    I have been playing the bottom of the fretboard, I think I will move to the top and then try to connect the entire fret board.

  9. #609
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Posts
    1,646

    Default

    I saw a beginners' thread about how does one know that one has learnt a song. I didn't look at it because I didn't imagine the respondents and I would have any affinity. I suppose they would say learning a song means slavishingly aping the way its been done before. And I have to say that that definition is what 99% of players would cotten to. However, being the educator that I am...if someone churned out a perfect mimicry of a song I would gladly give that person a grade of a C. Average. Nothing special. Nothing that hasn't already been done. To earn above average grades a person would have to do something that isn't prescribed on their little hand-held computer device. So...improvise with the rudiments of the song, make a solo from the melody, make a new song based on the principles of the original.

    For example, today I took one of the kernels of Rhythm Changes, the V-I (with, of course, the V of the V added for good measure). Then I would just play the ii-V-I in different voicings all over fretboard and interlard three measures of soloing between the chords. I restricted the solos to frets 12-19 and tried to focus on the F# as much as possible. Am I a genius? No. Am I even proficient? No. But I would give myself a grade of a B or maybe an A because at least I'm trying to do something original and something I can take some pride in because I didn't crib it off a PDF file.

    And speaking of originality, another week, another $100 in my Baritone fund to pay for my bespoke Baritone. I hope it will be as unique as my Yorkie.

  10. #610
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Posts
    1,646

    Default

    Speaking of my baritone, I wanted to write a little about the art of bespeaking a ukulele. In my opinion, the central principle must be to realize that you're a schmuck and you don't really know what makes a good ukulele. Therefore it is imperative to interfere as little as possible with the luthier. It is similar to being a helicopter mom who hovers over the child trying to make the perfect child whereas in reality the child becomes a spoilt, molly-coddled shell of a person. So it is best to interfere as little as possible with the process.

    There are a few things i care about, but there are many more that I don't care a F# about. So I tell the luthier what my deal breakers are: must have a cutaway, must have 19 frets with no fret markers, must have a flattened neck profile, and in the case of this baritone, it must have a stauffer headstock.

    Then, you have to have the courage to just walk away. Just walk away and let the artist do his magic. And it is magic. If you envisioned something to the most minute detail and then received it, where's the fun in that? But if you let the luthier do his job, there's a synergy between your ideas and his, and when you receive your uke there are some shocks and some things you never would have thought of. But then you accept the uke and its personality. And then you meld yourself to it. That's what makes the process special. The fact that you have created something for yourself that is unique unto you...that's why you pay for a custom uke.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •