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Thread: transposing Abm to key of C

  1. #1

    Default transposing Abm to key of C

    Song in key of E calls for one Aflatminor.
    Transposing that to Key of C would call for an Fbm, no?
    But I think that doesn't exist?

    So what would I use instead?

  2. #2
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    I think Fbm = Em.
    Trying to do justice to various musical instruments.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by uke1950 View Post
    I think Fbm = Em.
    Yes.

    Actually the chord OP is trying to transpose is G#m. It is the third degree chord in E major scale. So in C major the chord would be Em.

  4. #4

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    Oh, thank you both!!

  5. #5
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    don't give up on the Abminor; it is a very tasty chord. And going from an E maj or an Ab min is only a finger's difference. If you play the E as 1402 it is easy. The trick is on the C string fret the third fret with your annularis and the fourth fret with the pinky. Now to change to the Abminor, all you have to do is move the pinky from the C string to the E string. I only mention this on the off-chance that you might go back to the Ab at some point in the future. It is actually a really great key. With all the closed chords and "black key" notes, it really has a sound of its own.

  6. #6

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    I love the sound of the original chord, but the key wasn't a fit for my voice in this song

  7. #7

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    Coming back to this one...
    How did you guys figure this out?
    I used the circle of 5ths, and when I moved the circle around, the A landed at F...

  8. #8

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    This one I don't get...
    In the chart above, I see where the C transposes to an E, but not where the Ab/G# transposes to an E (nor to an Em).

    OH!!!! I see!!
    I just pulled out my Circle again. I see what I was doing wrong!
    I turned the E to line up with the C, but then transposed the A to F rather than the Ab to E (then add the minor).
    i.e., I hadn't even realized there was both an A and an Ab in that spectrum, to transpose.
    Last edited by joopiterandbeyond; 09-27-2017 at 09:34 PM.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by ubulele View Post
    You're looking at my chart backwards: the top row is the key you're transposing from (E major), the bottom row is the key you're transposing to (C major). C doesn't transpose to E, E transposes to C (E is above C). G# (top) transposes to E (bottom).
    Oh, I hadn't realized they don't just reverse. Yes, I see now.

    I'll explore the rest too...

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by joopiterandbeyond View Post
    Coming back to this one...
    How did you guys figure this out?
    I used the circle of 5ths, and when I moved the circle around, the A landed at F...
    I mainly use the circle of 5ths for recognizing the "neighbour" keys. While I can't transpose very easy or fast, I do base my transposing on chord degree relating to a scale. I remember by heart that the I, IV and V (1. 4. and 5.) degrees of E major scale are E, A and B. These are always major chords.

    I know also that the !! and III degree chords are F#m and G#m. Count as one whole step and 2 whole step up from E to find out if not knowing by heart. These are minor chords. The sixth degree VI is one whole step up from V if not knowing by heart and is C#m, always a minor chord in theory (there are always exceptions). VI degree scale note is also the relative minor of a major scale.

    Like ubulele posted you can also mechanically write down the notes of both scales and do this by a lookup. In fact this is what you should do if not knowing things by heart. But what you should always aim at is try learning the scale degree of chords.

    So I did not need to write any down, just knew that G#m is the 3rd degree chord in E major scale and same time knew that in C major scale the 3rd degree is Em.

    G# chord can be also used in E/C#m tunes. The third degree chord can be major or minor in praxis.

    --------------------------------

    I analyze the song and its chording like this: Notice that this is not theoretically correct regarding degrees in minor key, but works for me. Regardless if a song is in major or minor or whatever mode, I use same roman number degrees based on the key signature only and its major scale. As an example for C/Am key signature I use I IV and V for C, F an G. And for Am Dm and E, use VIm, IIm and III. Those are the 6 basic degrees I try recognize.
    Last edited by Jarmo_S; 09-28-2017 at 10:12 AM.

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