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Thread: Pistachio & Spruce Ukulele

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
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    Little River, California
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    2,150

    Default Pistachio & Spruce Ukulele

    Pistachio and spruce tenor uke with rosewood binding. I've never worked with this wood before but I was pleasantly surprised. I also was not sure how I liked all that green and pink. Looks pretty cool finished out though. Pictures don't really pick up that pink and green. Much more vibrant in RL....Bends easy which surprised me a bit considering that wacky grain. A sweet wood and a sweet sounding little ukulele. Note: Didn't really smell like pistachio nuts when I worked it. Darn. I love pistachio nuts.

    pistachio1.jpg

    pistachio2.jpg

    pistachio3.jpg

    pistachio4.jpg

    pistachio5.jpg

  2. #2
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    Dec 2014
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    Philly
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    She’s a beauty!

  3. #3
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    Oct 2015
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    Rochester, Kent UK
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    This is a great looking Uke, - I love a Uke with unusual woods
    Ziegenspeck, Howlett, Mulcock, Pereira, Kiwaya, Morgan, Hamano, Blackbird, Cigar Box, Enya, Fluke, Shima.

  4. #4
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    Dec 2009
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    USA
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    Beautiful uke! The pistachio reminds me of a good piece of black walnut, which is a great tonewood too.
    John

  5. #5
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    Jan 2014
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    San Jose, CA
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    Great work, the back sure looks rich in color! I also like the simple design of the headstock.

    Bob

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2016
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    8

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    Lovely and classic. How does the pistachio color the tone? What did you use to finish?

  7. #7
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    May 2010
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    UK
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    Not only the pistachio but I love the soundboard too. That grain has far more character than the fine grain stuff that everyone seems to be so obsessed about.

  8. #8
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    Oct 2014
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael N. View Post
    Not only the pistachio but I love the soundboard too. That grain has far more character than the fine grain stuff that everyone seems to be so obsessed about.
    You know I remember a great debate going on in the guitar builders world many years ago about wide grain versus close grain in Sitka spruce tops. I wasn't a builder at the time, but the basic argument is that grain width doesn't matter in how the top sounds. Well I can tell you after building with both I don't agree. This is what I think: The difference is subtle, but I think all that open grain gives a more rounded sound across the octaves and the tight ass stuff is more focused and punchy. (Punchy? Give me a break). However, the people that buy acoustic instruments made with spruce like the look of tight, even grain and thus tight grain is the preferred wood for "master grade" etc. However, those in the know, like "ugly" wide grained spruce. Sweet.

    Answering Hakuguu question on how pistachio colors the tone: Frankly I don't really know. This is an area that baffles me... The finish is number one blond shellac.

  9. #9
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    May 2010
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    UK
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    Doubt that fine or wide grain alters anything. Just measure the properties of the individual piece of wood - namely density and stiffness. Those are properties that are going to have a direct effect on the outcome. Fine grain, wide grain, colour streaks, uneven grain are all cosmetic. That's how tonewood is sold, mainly by cosmetic considerations. People have been conditioned into believing that fine grain = great tone, wide grain = poor tone. Just pure marketing crap. It's complete and utter nonsense.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
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    under the palms in tempe, az
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    That's some pretty looking pistachio on a pretty looking uke! I can make out the pinks and greens just fine with the brightness level set on high.

    I believe that pattern is called Regency Spruce. It can also be called Pencil or Pinstripe, but you could call it anything you like if you keep using and marketing it. No different than Bearclaw Spruce, Windowpane Mahogany, or anything else out there.

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