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Thread: Looking for an electric steel-string ukulele

  1. #11
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    Nov 2015
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    Upper Hale, Surrey/Hants border, UK.
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    That's an interesting bit of info, Booli, will have to try & remember it.
    Trying to do justice to various musical instruments.

  2. #12
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    Jan 2015
    Location
    Franklin, TN
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    Cool tip. Thanks.
    The two pickup don't have to be immediately adjacent to one another for this to work?

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
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    Quote Originally Posted by Croaky Keith View Post
    That's an interesting bit of info, Booli, will have to try & remember it.
    Thanks Keith

    Quote Originally Posted by Futurethink View Post
    Cool tip. Thanks.
    The two pickup don't have to be immediately adjacent to one another for this to work?
    No, not necessarily. It's really just simple physics in that the electrical signal is a simple sine wave, and by rotating the second pickup, you are altering the phase of the wave of the rotated pickup to be 180 degrees out of phase with the other pickup, and when the signal is combined in maybe only 8" of wires where they terminate together at the volume/tone potentiometers and are combined there, and the output of both pickups is summed into these controls and then sent combined to the output jack.

    One may think that the alternately-phased pickups need to be almost touching, but this is not always needed, and any difference in the signal with reversing one pickup as I've detailed here is going to be minimal and likely only seen with an oscilloscope as a maybe a 1-5% drop in amplitude (output gain or volume) which can easily be compensated for by your amplifier or pedals or recording interface.

    A similar kind of thing can be seen if you wire up a pair of stereo speakers to an amplifier and one of the pair is intentionally wired out of phase to the other, i.e., instead of connecting the plus to the plus and the minus to the minus on each speaker, one of them you can connect the plus to the minus and vice-versa and at the SAME volume setting as the proper connection (keep the volume setting lower though to prevent speaker damage) you will notice a slightly lower sound output level. Some folks cannot hear the difference and need to be shown on a decibel meter, but it exists because the sound waves (sine waves) of equal frequencies and equal amplitude that are out of phase will cancel out and sum to zero, and thus there is less sound energy perceived by the listener.

    Again, do not pump the volume up too loud, because doing this inverse wiring will cause the magnet in the voice coil that drives the speaker cone to move opposite to the other and the higher volume will cause the cone to extrude (vibrate) TOWARDS the magnet instead of away, and if loud enough the speaker cone can get separated from the voice coil part and then the speaker element will need to be repaired or replaced.

    Do this at your own risk if you want to test it, but keep the volume set low enough that someone standing 10 ft away can still hear you talking in a normal speaking voice, otherwise it is too loud and will kill the speaker.
    Guinea proverb: "A cow that has no tail should not try to chase away flies."

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    GA
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    Not a uke, but may be something you might like.
    I am selling this, with all funds being donated to Darwins Burgers & Blues in Sandy Springs GA. A great place to play and listen to live music.

    This is a J Bovier EMC 4 an excellent electric mandolin. G, D, A, E. Plugged into a tube amp, it roars with pedals as a guitar would, and it can play smooth jazz tones if you please. The action can be easily adjusted and the tuning pegs are well made, allowing it to stay in tune while being played. included is a gig bag and set of extra strings. Excellent condition and seldom and lightly played.
    $400 plus shipping costs.

    Specs:
    • Body shape similar to “Vintage”
    • Tortoise pick-guard
    • 3-way switch, Tone, & Volume controls
    • Output jack mounted on pick-guard
    • Maple, Radiused Fretboard
    • .080″ Frets
    • Dual “JB-53″ Custom Pickups = (+/-) 6K each
    • Chrome Bridge & Saddles
    • Chrome Control Knobs
    • Chrome Strap Buttons
    • Chrome Neck Plate
    • Solid Basswood Body
    • Solid Maple Neck
    • Bolt-On Neck
    • Slender headstock shape
    • Maple Headstock Face
    • Black “JBovier” script logo
    • (1) Volume Control = 500K
    • (1) Tone Control = 500K
    • 4-to-a-side tuners

    • Bone Nut = 28mm (4-string)
    • Wilkinson “J-805″ Tuners
    • 3-way Switch = Neck PU, Both PUs (hum cancelling), or Bridge PU
    • 2 Finish Colors = “Vintage Cream” (shown) & “Classic Sunburst”
    • Custom, Premium, thickly padded gig-bags with “JBovier” logo included


  5. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
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    Tampa Bay, FL
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    Check this out. This might be what you're looking for.
    http://forum.ukuleleunderground.com/...teel/page3#top
    "Those who bring sunshine and laughter to the lives of others cannot keep it from themselves".

    Music washes from the soul, the dust of everyday living.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Stratford, Connecticut
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    So you are a guitar player looking for a tiny guitar then. I myself have had a want for a mini version of my old axe heck I even started building up parts for it a few years ago. It is still only a want. Since then I must have bought around 20 ukuleles. Enjoying the slight differences of each instrument and experimenting with different tuning.

    Play only ukulele strings a few years start tweaking your sound files for a hotter piezo pickup and going back to a magnetic pickup well the instrument sounds dull and your fingers hurt. If I now built the mini axe it would likely not be steel stringed. I experienced this when I bought my used soprano Konablaster. Plugged it into my RP360 and had to reload some guitar presets to get anything normal sounding out of it. The signal is just dead compared to a piezo.

    Long way round to the Blue Star Guitar Co. but we got there! http://bluestarguitarcompany.com/ukuleles/1811901

    While their standard body style is a canned ham they do state "The Deluxe versions of all can be designed to any size ukulele or guitar shapes, and as single or double cutaway models." They even have a couple pictures of a LP design they have done, while it is not as carved as the custom one you showed it is a quality instrument just the same. As these are deluxe models they are string through body with adjustable intonation as well but likely over your comfort range in price.

    Ive seen a few used sopranos in the canned ham shape around $120ish if you wait and look. The Konablaster is every bit as quality an instrument as a Risa and its made is the U.S.A. if that matters.

    ~AL
    This space reserved for a smart or witty comment or a famous quote. It may also be used to promote my accomplishments should I ever accomplish anything worth sharing.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Salt Lake City, UT
    Posts
    54

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    Quote Originally Posted by anthonyarc10 View Post
    TL;DR:
    -fully electric metal-string uke
    -under $300 (the lower the better)
    -Les Paul preferred
    Here are a few that I have made. If you like these, I could probably make you something similar within your budget.
    Mahogany_Les_Paul[1].jpg
    Ash_Electric[1].jpg
    Attachment 104779
    Stratolele.jpg

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