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Thread: Saddle replacement

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2015
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    Sweet Home Osaka Japan
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    Default Saddle replacement

    I've replaced a saddle on my ukulele.

    A: We just need new saddle and a piece of sandpaper. I used most coarse grit one. My new saddle is ebony.
    B: We need to sand sides first then bottom of the saddle. Otherwise we can not make it even, because saddle is very small.
    C: It takes only 10 min. New one fits very nice. I made a straight saddle.

    Kamaka HF-1 100

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
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    over yonder
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    Default

    Nice job!

    Thanks for the photos too
    This FAQ link will help you learn about:
    - Magic Fluke Company ukes
    - Pickups, Preamps and Impedance Mismatch
    - Home Recording and Mics
    - String Upgrades
    - iPad Microphones
    - Wolfelele Uke Kit
    - How to string a Baritone uke as a piccolo bass
    - Strings I used for GDAE and CGDA fifths tunings

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
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    249

    Default

    I'm still waiting for my nut "files", but yes everyone should know how to make a saddle for a guitar or ukulele. Nut is something I know to be careful and not for everyone. There is the filing angle that is a most delicate subject. I hope I can manage that.

    Thank you for sharing the advice. Done that to my guitar.

    Could be also that because of humidity we could need summer and winter saddles.
    I have only made one for my classical 40 year old guitar. But it felt good be able to fix my instrument without outsiders help. (It's bridge had lifted higher because of my teeny age steel string experiment to a classical guitar lol).

    I might add that the the old/existing saddle is very helpful in making of what to sand down. After making the saddle width proper. To mark the outlines someways.

    In my case it certainly took more than 10 minutes, but I loved the end result
    Last edited by Jarmo_S; 12-15-2017 at 02:45 AM.

  4. #4
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    Mar 2015
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    USA
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    Default

    I like the look of that ebony saddle.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jarmo_S View Post
    I'm still waiting for my nut "files", but yes everyone should know how to make a saddle for a guitar or ukulele. Nut is something I know to be careful and not for everyone. There is the filing angle that is a most delicate subject. I hope I can manage that.
    You'll do fine with the angle if you just take your time. I usually leave the string on and just let it sit on top of the nut next to the slot being filed. Then you can simply follow as closely to the break angle of the string as you can. That has always worked well for me. I usually find getting the depth is the more tedious thing. I just go really slowly and check often during. A nut or saddle on a uke lasts a loooooooong time compared to a steel string instrument (grooves get worn in) which is nice.

  5. #5
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    May 2015
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    Hi, Jarmo_S!



    I don't much care about any angle. 4 slots are just parallel as seen in the right figure below.
    Kamaka HF-1 100

  6. #6
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    ^ Yes, four slots are parallel in the sense you're talking about. However, I understood it as Jarmo was thinking of the break angle from the front of the nut slot to the back of the slot, which should follow the angle the strings break over the nut as closely as possible. Otherwise, problems can arise.
    Last edited by jer; 12-16-2017 at 01:47 PM.

  7. #7
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    Aug 2017
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    Quote Originally Posted by jer View Post
    ^ Yes, four slots are parallel in the sense you're talking about. However, I understood it as Jarmo was thinking of the break angle from the front of the nut slot to the back of the slot, which should follow the angle the strings break over the nut as closely as possible. Otherwise, problems can arise.
    Yes, I have understood that to have proper intonation it is most important to have the first string contact at the neck side of the nut, not in the middle etc. point. So parallel to neck file angle is not a good idea at all. Even with a proper filing angle, if the tip cleaner "file" is flexible, it maybe can cause intonation problems because of that. Just my thoughts, they have not arrived yet

  8. #8
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    Hi, Jomo_S!

    Quote Originally Posted by Jarmo_S View Post
    Yes, I have understood that to have proper intonation it is most important to have the first string contact at the neck side of the nut, not in the middle etc. point. So parallel to neck file angle is not a good idea at all. Even with a proper filing angle, if the tip cleaner "file" is flexible, it maybe can cause intonation problems because of that. Just my thoughts, they have not arrived yet
    I have no idea the angle what you are talking. I make the break angle like the figure below and it is very easy because it is just parallel to the fret board or base of nut. I made many nut but I haven't any trouble about intonation before.


    Kamaka HF-1 100

  9. #9
    Join Date
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    Ontario.Canada.
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    Default

    Good picture zztush of the angle needed. If one keeps the angle of the headstock and the tuners as a guide then all will be good.
    Always remember, as you said zztush,check often to prevent unnecessary headaches. How slow can you go is uppermost in the process.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jarmo_S View Post
    Yes, I have understood that to have proper intonation it is most important to have the first string contact at the neck side of the nut, not in the middle etc. point. So parallel to neck file angle is not a good idea at all. Even with a proper filing angle, if the tip cleaner "file" is flexible, it maybe can cause intonation problems because of that. Just my thoughts, they have not arrived yet
    In my experience it can have a very minor effect on intonation, yeah...I find the depth of the slot has more of an effect on intonation. If the slot isn't deep enough, the first fret or so will play sharp.
    The main problem I've experienced, if the break angle is too far off, is some unclear notes or even pinging type noises or other odd and unwanted noises. One of my first ever nut repairs years ago was something along those lines. Fortunately, someone with experience on a guitar board I was on was able to share about angle and it helped me fix the issue. I have also learned it's better to err on the side of too steep an angle as opposed to too shallow.
    The good news is, you don't have to be perfect with it just pretty close.
    Last edited by jer; 12-17-2017 at 09:17 AM.

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