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Thread: "Chords are just arpeggios"

  1. #61
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    I don't even know what this thread is about any more.

    The semantics are so thick that the focus has been lost to me. This bickering form of debate has made this topic sour for me.

    Ubulele has tried to impart both useful and practical knowledge and the resistance to understanding it and accepting it with an open mind has been, extreme.

    I am tired by this thread.

    As such I am going to un-sub this thread after posting this, but I kindly suggest that we each consider that there is a huge world of music that many folks will never understand, either due to lack of trying or due to willful resistance, and maybe we should each ask ourselves, if it is worth doing something well, half-baked, or just not at all?

    Peace be with you.
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  2. #62
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    From the Harvard Dictionary of Music:
    Arpeggio-The notes of a chord played one after the other instead of simultaneously. ....Its execution always starts with the lowest note

  3. #63
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    Well, okay then!
    A bunch of stringed instruments tuned in fifths. And a bunch of cats!


    "There are two refuges from the miseries of life: music and cats." - Albert Schweitzer

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  4. #64
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    From dictionary.com
    1.
    the sounding of the notes of a chord in rapid succession instead of simultaneously.
    2.
    a chord thus sounded.

    Merriam-Webster

    Definition of arpeggio
    plural arpeggios
    1 : production of the tones of a chord in succession and not simultaneously
    2 : a chord played in arpeggio

    Cambridge English Dictionary
    the notes of a musical chord played quickly one after the other instead of together

    MacMillian Dictionary
    a set of musical notes produced by playing each note in a chord separately instead of together

    WordReference.com Random House
    (in music) the sounding of the notes of a chord one after the other very quickly.


    Oxford English dictionary
    The notes of a chord played in rapid succession, either ascending or descending.

    So, hardly unanimous!

  5. #65
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    [QUOTE=sopher;2025989]In 2nd grade I learned that the Moon is made of cheese.

    I did want to tellyou something about the moon

    When a blues or rock lead guitarist is playing an "arpeggio", he thinks in "arpeggio shapes" but not in chord shapes. He is fretting and playing only one note at a time and not the whole chord and is playing a melodic pattern, not one chord note after the other. Its not my idea to call this arpeggio but blues guitarists do it.

  6. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by EDW View Post
    From the Harvard Dictionary of Music:
    ....Its execution always starts with the lowest note
    Well, I guess I'd better tell Sam Muir. She gave me lots of right hand arpeggios to practice that don't start with the lowest note.
    "Those who bring sunshine and laughter to the lives of others cannot keep it from themselves".

    Music washes from the soul, the dust of everyday living.

  7. #67
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    [QUOTE=ukuvas;2026220]
    Quote Originally Posted by sopher View Post
    In 2nd grade I learned that the Moon is made of cheese.

    I did want to tellyou something about the moon

    When a blues or rock lead guitarist is playing an "arpeggio", he thinks in "arpeggio shapes" but not in chord shapes. He is fretting and playing only one note at a time and not the whole chord and is playing a melodic pattern, not one chord note after the other. Its not my idea to call this arpeggio but blues guitarists do it.
    Well, I played guitar in a band long, long ago, and yes, there is a tendency to think of "shapes". But, generally, they are based on scales and not just chords. Even when "playing the changes" players are not limited to chord tones alone, so I'm not sure that qualifies as an arpeggio.

    Now I have a tendency to play chords using sort of Scruggs 3-finger picking patterns, although not really banjo rolls or Travis picking. I'm not sure of that either, but when I describe that style as "arpeggio chords" people don't seem surprised when they hear it, so I think the general understanding of arpeggio includes that.

  8. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nickie View Post
    Well, I guess I'd better tell Sam Muir. She gave me lots of right hand arpeggios to practice that don't start with the lowest note.
    You def should ask for your money back!

  9. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nickie View Post
    Well, I guess I'd better tell Sam Muir. She gave me lots of right hand arpeggios to practice that don't start with the lowest note.
    I've heard of being busier than a one-armed wallpaper hanger, but don't you need both hands for arpeggios? I do!


    bratsche
    A bunch of stringed instruments tuned in fifths. And a bunch of cats!


    "There are two refuges from the miseries of life: music and cats." - Albert Schweitzer

    GearGems - Gifts & apparel for musicians and more!

  10. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by bratsche View Post
    I've heard of being busier than a one-armed wallpaper hanger, but don't you need both hands for arpeggios? I do!


    bratsche
    These are just right hand arpeggios for strengthening right hand memory. It's Sam Muir's Little Book of Right Hand Arpeggios.
    No kidding.
    "Those who bring sunshine and laughter to the lives of others cannot keep it from themselves".

    Music washes from the soul, the dust of everyday living.

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