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Thread: Tune Low G to High G?

  1. #1
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    Default Tune Low G to High G?

    Some of the songs I've been learning mention to "return to low G", which to this point for me means put down the Pono and pick up the Fluke, both tenors. I play about 1/2 and 1/2, high and low g.

    Heading out of town for a few months and only taking one uke. I tried retuning the Pono's high G to a low g (Aquila Reds) but it ends up like a loose rubber band.

    On the Fluke I have a Thomastik-Infeld CF27 flat wound for the low g. Can I crank this one up to high G? I don't have a spare string and don't want to break it. I have no idea how tough wound strings are.

  2. #2
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    I don't think I would go more than two or three semi tones upward with any string if you want it to be able to return to its original tuning.
    Trying to do justice to various musical instruments.

  3. #3
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    No, do not attempt to raise the pitch by an octave. You are likely to break the string or damage your instrument in the process.
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  4. #4
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    Thanks, not worth taking a chance.

  5. #5
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    Yes. The frequency of string is proportional to a square root of string tension. So an octave = twice higher pitch frequency requires 4 times as much tension, other things remaining constant. So it is rather an approximation.

    Wound G string probably will break earlier than plain plastic string. Anyways the ukulele can get damaged by such foolishness too
    Last edited by Jarmo_S; 01-01-2018 at 05:18 AM.

  6. #6
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    This scenario is a perfect example of why you should have a couple spare sets of strings. Keeping a low G and high G at home gives you options. If you break a string you can use one of the individual strings from the package to replace the broken string. You can switch out just the G string with a high G or low G as your heart desires.
    Ukuleles.............yes please !!!!

  7. #7
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    You would *probably* snap the string before damaging the uke, but yeah, it just ain't gonna work. I snapped about three guitar strings in a row years back before I realized I was trying to tune an octave too high. #foreheadslap. Since then I've always changed one string at a time.
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  8. #8
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    Could one use a 2nd C string instead of the G, going up or down from there to the G of choice?

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by padlin View Post
    Could one use a 2nd C string instead of the G, going up or down from there to the G of choice?
    You "could" use a florocabon C string which usually measures about .030" and use it in the G position for low G. The trouble is the tension will be very loose and floppy, most floro low G strings are around .035". You cannot tune this up to high G, too thick, too much tension.

    Buy one Fremont squeakless wound low G string. Bring the uke stung with a high G set and you can swap the G strings back a forth with some care.
    Ukuleles.............yes please !!!!

  10. #10
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    Dang, so much for an easy way.

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