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Thread: Shoe String Acoustic Guitar Build Almost Anyone Can Build

  1. #21
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    Nov 2015
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    Upper Hale, Surrey/Hants border, UK.
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    A lot of knowledge, work, & skill going into this build, very interesting.
    Trying to do justice to various musical instruments.

  2. #22
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    Mar 2009
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    Stockton on Tees..North East UK.
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    Love the way you carved out the neck ...Reminded me of the first bass guitar neck I made back in 1966, I made a load of saw cuts along the back just as you did and then I commenced to knock off the chunks with a large hammer and chisel with the hardwood neck blank resting on the floor..In those days I lived in a tower block of flats..and loads of my neighbours complained about the noise...I got away with it by pretending I was also one of the complainants..and no one ever suspected that I was the culprit.
    http://ukulele-innovation.tripod.com ebay i/d squarepeg_3000

  3. #23
    Join Date
    May 2015
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    310

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    Same idea as the jaws of the vice and filing a flat section. Two pieces of steel clamped where you want the flat to be. They do not need to be parallel or one can be angled and lower than the other (why you would want that I don't know of the top of my head) but another option to shape some wood.



    Took away part of the pointy end. Keep working on it until it looks and feels right. Sometimes the grain lines do not get worked down as far as the softer bits, you will know when it is time to say, heck that is good enough.



    Along with flossing the neck with sandpaper a few makeshift tools are handy. A scrap section of the top.



    Packing material to conform to the curves.


  4. #24
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    May 2015
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    As a final step I use the dull razor knife blade to scrape everything flat and smooth. I give it a slight bend when I do the curves.



    Sort of a pleasing shape.



    I don't know. I was going to dye the fretboard black but I might just leave it as is. I may have to give making a bridge for this one some serious thought. What do you think?


  5. #25
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Little River, California
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    1,760

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    Quote Originally Posted by Timbuck View Post
    and loads of my neighbours complained about the noise...I got away with it by pretending I was also one of the complainants..and no one ever suspected that I was the culprit.
    Now that is funny. Who is that bloke making all that damned noise? Bloody wankers!

    Don't mean to hijack the thread so I will say I admire that neck job. It ain't easy and you have done well. However I keep thinking that you have done such a nice job on this instrument that it is a pity you didn't use better quality wood because that project is turning into a pretty darn good looking guitar. Maybe next time some mahogany or?....

  6. #26
    Join Date
    May 2015
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    I have a couple of other guitars on the go, one all spruce but with good wood. I plan that one to be one of my daily player. This one I think will go to a buddy who wants a guitar from me to hang on the wall so the type of wood is not so much an issue. I think it might actually sound alright and I am making it as if there might be a time someone might pull it down and play a tune or two. Also I wanted to show what you can do with what you got. I built one guitar and had documented it on a woodworking site. One guy said it goes to show you it is not the tools, others on the forum wouldn't think of doing such a project without professional tools. It would be easier with a full tool chest of good tools but you can do things with what you got, you just have to take a little more care and patience. The 14 year old kid that wanted to build a guitar but thought he did not have the tools to make one ordered some cypress and spruce yesterday, hope I had something to do with it. I hope after I am finished with this one maybe someone else will read it and take the plunge also.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    May 2015
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    Decided to go with a maple bridge. Also put a radius on the fretboard with sandpaper and a block with a 12" radius cut in it. I don't think this will be much of a classical player.



    Roughed out the bridge with the hacksaw.



    Cleaned up the dimensions with my handy dandy big file. I like it a lot. I marked out the saddle slot and slit inside the lines to give me somewhere to start with. Then started to cut at an angle and picking out bits of wood. This is going nowhere



    That is better. The saw has a wide kerf for normal guitar making jobs but it was still too narrow to make the saddle slot. I angled the saw and cut more into the slot width, I also found that pushing fairly slow and making sure the teeth were level I could get a pretty clean surface on the bottom.


  8. #28
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    May 2015
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    I have a needle file I use to do frets with. One narrow edge is filed flat so the teeth do not cut the fretboard when shaping the frets. I used that side down while I worked on the sides of the slot.



    I used the razor saw to cut the tie block and the center section out. I probably would use it for doing the saddle slot if I ever did it this way again (not bloody likely).



    The center section cut out, filed a small radius in the back of the tieblock. Used the bought bridge to space the holes for the strings.



    The holes angle up so I had to tilt the bridge when drilling with the drill press. I used a saddle to angle the top out and one at the bottom so the clamp would be giving pressure on the top and bottom.No doing this freehand if you want the strings to end up in the right place, sorry.


  9. #29
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    May 2015
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    Even with the handsaw doing a fair job of cleaning up the bottom of the saddle slot there is no way it would be flat enough so the saddle sits on the bottom the whole length of the slot. My solution of not having a edged tool the right width and one that would machine the slot flat. Some angle iron from a bed frame gave up a piece of steel (actually is not iron) which I filed the right width and honed a sharp edge on it. I then had it stick out of the vice just enough to come into contact with the bottom of the saddle slot. I then lined up the slot with the tool and pushed the bridge the length of the slot. Took some effort but it cut a little curl of wood.



    I marked the bottom of the slot with a pencil and took a few more runs at the tool raising it up a touch each time. With the pencil lines still showing I have a few more times to go.



    The saddle fits pretty good and is tight enough that it won't fall out.



    Because there is a radius on the guitar top the bridge needs to be radiused also to fit well. I used a blade to scrape the center section.


  10. #30
    Join Date
    May 2015
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    Once the bridge is close to shape we put sandpaper on the top where the bridge will sit and sand the top's shape into the bottom of the bridge. Things always glue up better if they fit well together.



    Normally if a neck is bolted on the bolt is tightened on inside the box. But in doing that there must be a good mechanical connection between the bolt and the neck, that is not going to happen with a spruce neck as the fastener might just pull out of the wood with any kind of accidental rough treatment. It is better the screw bites into the plywood block while pulling the neck tight. A pilot hole for the screw, it was lined up in the center but the bit took the easy rout through the soft wood. No matter for what we need it to do.



    Should have used the forsner bit first, oh well I got it done. Rather than use a wood screw which has a bevel at its base I will be using a machine screw which has a flat base beneath the head. We do not want the bevel to give the wood a reason to get spread apart and create a crack, not a lot of meat here.



    Lined up the neck so it is lined up with the center of the guitar at the tail block. Clamped the neck solid and drilled a pilot hole through our hole and into the neck block.


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