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Thread: Where to Retire to?

  1. #21
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    Feb 2009
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    Moku Manu, Hawai'i
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    East side of Big Island has relatively cheap land about $20,000 for a rural 3 acre plot but this is way out in the boonies with unpaved roads, no electricity, nor water, with meth labs and pakalōlō farmers for neighbors not to mention the VOG and acid rain that results from it. Burglary, and uncaring law enforcement issues too. Terrible reputation medical facilities too which is not confidence inspiring for retired seniors needing any medical attention. Retirement in Hawaiʻi is for the wealthy not for anyone with my limited retirement finances. Living off the grid and off the land had great appeal to me as a young man, not so much now with the big 6-0 just around the corner, and chronic health issues to deal with.
    Last edited by Ahnko Honu; 02-04-2018 at 05:23 PM.
    Illegitimus Non Carborundum

    I ʻike lākou, ʻo ʻoe, ka mea wale nō nona ka inoa ʻo IĒHOVA;
    ʻO ʻoe nō ka Mea kiʻekiʻe loa ma luna o ka honua a pau.
    Nā Halelū 83:18

  2. #22
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    My eldest son is trying to talk me into retiring in rural Japan where property prices and cost of living can be quite reasonable. I can already speak the lingo though can't read nor write but Kana should be easy to learn if I just get off my 'okole. Many rural villages are almost ghost towns with youths exiting to urban areas for better employment opportunities these ones not wanting to farm. I have always enjoyed rural life so this has appeal to me.
    Illegitimus Non Carborundum

    I ʻike lākou, ʻo ʻoe, ka mea wale nō nona ka inoa ʻo IĒHOVA;
    ʻO ʻoe nō ka Mea kiʻekiʻe loa ma luna o ka honua a pau.
    Nā Halelū 83:18

  3. #23
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    Apr 2017
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    U.K.
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    Would you end up being near to friends and relatives in Rural Japan? If not then it sounds a doubtful move to me as I think that support networks are really important in old age. We have one older relative who lives alone and suffers with dementia, unfortunately he’s two hours drive away and vulnerable to abuse. My wife visits every couple of weeks to top the freezer up with food, to clean the house, wash clothes and the like. His wife died last year and my wife stayed in their house and attended to her in hospital too, essential care really but what do you do if it’s not there for you?

    In Japan your wife would look like a native but unless you both speak and, importantly, read and write the local language then you will have problems. Here, in the U.K., we have many people that retire to France and Spain where the property can be cheaper and the weather better. After a good decade or two they return home in their 70’s and 80’s because they haven’t a support network for infirmity and didn’t learn the language properly. Currency fluctuations also upset their financial position - the pension payments in the weakened pound can leave them poor when living on euros.

  4. #24
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    Mar 2014
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    Ames, Iowa/San Juan, Puerto Rico
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    Quote Originally Posted by Graham Greenbag View Post
    Would you end up being near to friends and relatives in Rural Japan? If not then it sounds a doubtful move to me as I think that support networks are really important in old age. We have one older relative who lives alone and suffers with dementia, unfortunately he’s two hours drive away and vulnerable to abuse. My wife visits every couple of weeks to top the freezer up with food, to clean the house, wash clothes and the like. His wife died last year and my wife stayed in their house and attended to her in hospital too, essential care really but what do you do if it’s not there for you?

    .
    I agree with that statement. We are going through that right now.
    I don't want to live in a world that is linear.

    https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_n...tective+Agency

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Umeć, Sweden
    Posts
    225

    Default The torture never stops

    Please, donŽt come here!
    YouŽd be as poor as a rat, i.e. me!
    I think IŽd like to retire here instead, if I could afford.
    Please try to promise to not hold it against me in the future though.

    Cheers, regards Henning

  6. #26
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    Apr 2014
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    Southern California
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    We would like to move away from California. There’s lots of good things here, but lots of bad stuff too. There are too, too many people here. Everything is crowded and the traffic is horrible.

    We were gonna move to Idaho near an Air Force base, but decided that we’d hate the cold. We like Utah. We’ve driven thru it many times, and it seems like a nice place. And I was stationed in San Antonio, Texas twice and went to a school in San Angelo. We like the New Braunfels and Fredericksburg area, but the tornadoes are somethin’ to think about. I guess none of these places have a lot of water though.

    Anyway, the thought of moving again gives me the shivers—all that packing—Ugh! Easier to like where you are!
    Kala "Spalted" baritone - Lo D GBE
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    God gave us old age so we wouldn't mind dying so much.

  7. #27
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    May 2014
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    Half my life (by choice) has been in Central Floride - with absolutely no regrets. There's a variety of housing and life-style options to fit almost any budget, coupled with a no-state-income-tax posture. I'm in a rural county which has the largest over-55 community (thevillages.com) in the world within it. So, affordable retirement options within the "lower 48" still exist.
    ...SteveZ

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  8. #28
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    Feb 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by Graham Greenbag View Post
    Would you end up being near to friends and relatives in Rural Japan? If not then it sounds a doubtful move to me as I think that support networks are really important in old age. We have one older relative who lives alone and suffers with dementia, unfortunately he’s two hours drive away and vulnerable to abuse. My wife visits every couple of weeks to top the freezer up with food, to clean the house, wash clothes and the like. His wife died last year and my wife stayed in their house and attended to her in hospital too, essential care really but what do you do if it’s not there for you?

    In Japan your wife would look like a native but unless you both speak and, importantly, read and write the local language then you will have problems. Here, in the U.K., we have many people that retire to France and Spain where the property can be cheaper and the weather better. After a good decade or two they return home in their 70’s and 80’s because they haven’t a support network for infirmity and didn’t learn the language properly. Currency fluctuations also upset their financial position - the pension payments in the weakened pound can leave them poor when living on euros.
    I can speak Japanese fluently (born there, first language, lived there for 7 years), but I need to brush up on my reading/writing. My wife reads very well but her speaking is a tad broken. We make a great communication team though.
    My Dad's family very small with his one sibling (passed away), not close to that side of family at all. My Mom's family had 13 siblings so half of Japan related to me though I have only kept in touch with a handful of my cousins. My wife has a brother in Japan married to a Japanese national. He is retired US Army, just bought a home there, and LOVES living in Japan. Of my siblings (we total 6) I am "last of the Mohicans" left in Hawai'i, and only close to two of them. One lives in SF Bay Area (can't afford to live there), and the other in SW Florida where I lean when talking a move to continental US.
    Honestly though I have never found friends or family to be that reliable except a few examples here where I can't afford to live, and most have moved away anyways. Wife and I are very self reliant. A support network is a moot point as I will not allow myself to deteriorate physically nor mentally to the point where I become a burden to any friends or family. I'd like to find a place where I can enjoy my twilight years with my wife living comfortably on our very fixed income in a safe community at minimum expense. Am I asking too much?
    Last edited by Ahnko Honu; 02-13-2018 at 03:09 PM. Reason: LOLO az why
    Illegitimus Non Carborundum

    I ʻike lākou, ʻo ʻoe, ka mea wale nō nona ka inoa ʻo IĒHOVA;
    ʻO ʻoe nō ka Mea kiʻekiʻe loa ma luna o ka honua a pau.
    Nā Halelū 83:18

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    210

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    Japan looks like a great option.

    Found this one in Chiba -https://www.century21global.com/property/皆吉-市原市-chiba-290-0232-japan-C21113051043-USD - Houses used to be that cheap in the nineties down here in NZ.
    Now you are lucky if you can find a garage for this kind of money.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ahnko Honu View Post
    I can speak Japanese fluently (born there, first language, lived there for 7 years), but I need to brush up on my reading/writing. My wife reads very well but her speaking is a tad broken. We make a great communication team though.
    My Dad's family very small with his one sibling (passed away), not close to that side of family at all. My Mom's family had 13 siblings so half of Japan related to me though I have only kept in touch with a handful of my cousins. My wife has a brother in Japan married to a Japanese national. He is retired US Army, just bought a home there, and LOVES living in Japan. Of my siblings (we total 6) I am "last of the Mohicans" left in Hawai'i, and only close to two of them. One lives in SF Bay Area (can't afford to live there), and the other in SW Florida where I lean when talking a move to continental US.
    Honestly though I have never found friends or family to be that reliable except a few examples here where I can't afford to live, and most have moved away anyways. Wife and I are very self reliant. A support network is a moot point as I will not allow myself to deteriorate physically nor mentally to the point where I become a burden to any friends or family. I'd like to find a place where I can enjoy my twilight years with my wife living comfortably on our very fixed income in a safe community at minimum expense. Am I asking too much?
    With the additional information supplied it seems to me that Japan has a lot going for it as a viable option for you and your wife. I wonder what the health care arrangements are and how near you can be to your Brother and Sister-in-Law.

    Friends and family can’t always be relied on, for sure that’s true, but at some time you or your wife will need something - virtually everyone does. I note your stance on physical and mental health and have seem the same from others. My Sister’s in-laws were very capable business people and had a similar determination to you, however her Mother-in-Law got dementia (though she’d always been mentally very sharp and a determined character) and a little later her Father-in-Law became completely infirm (he’d always been physically active). My Sister ‘bust a gut’ caring for them but eventually both had to go into a ‘home’ where they eventually died - my Brother-in-Law has one sibling who was no help what so ever, but his sibling still enjoys a nice inheritance.

    Sometimes we only have flawed options, but that’s not to say one of the better ones can’t be made to work - I seem to have done or attempted that for most of my life.

    Good luck.
    Last edited by Graham Greenbag; 02-18-2018 at 08:55 PM.

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