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Thread: Trying to make a start

  1. #1
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    Default Trying to make a start

    Yesterday I serviced the bandsaw and fitted a new fastcut blade ready to start resawing a batch of Honduran mahogany slices for my 2018 first sopranos ...This morning I decided to wait a while until the weather improves ...Put the kettle on Janet we'll make a pot of tea instead !
    PICT0049 (2) by Ken Timms, on Flickr
    http://ukulele-innovation.tripod.com ebay i/d squarepeg_3000

  2. #2
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    Ah, very pretty, - cuppa, feet up, & just sit & watch it snow......
    Trying to do justice to various musical instruments.

  3. #3
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    The snow is thawing just as fast as it is falling...So I decided to man up and go in the workshop and do a bit...In the end I got enough Honduran mahogany slices for about 15 sopranos.
    PICT0039 by Ken Timms, on Flickr
    http://ukulele-innovation.tripod.com ebay i/d squarepeg_3000

  4. #4
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    i bet the workshop smells lovely after all that mahogany re-sawing. I love that smell

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by orangeena View Post
    i bet the workshop smells lovely after all that mahogany re-sawing. I love that smell
    As it happens i did a load of spray painting on a guitar restoration project over the last few days and the smell of cellulose still prevails.
    http://ukulele-innovation.tripod.com ebay i/d squarepeg_3000

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Timbuck View Post
    Yesterday I serviced the bandsaw and fitted a new fastcut blade ready to start resawing a batch of Honduran mahogany slices for my 2018 first sopranos ...This morning I decided to wait a while until the weather improves ...Put the kettle on Janet we'll make a pot of tea instead !
    PICT0049 (2) by Ken Timms, on Flickr
    Looks a little bit like Santa's workshop on Christmas Eve. Soon the little elves will be busy making ukuleles.... I hear you on the wet and cold shop. Humidity? Ha! Cold? We laugh. Ha, ha, cough, ha, cough. If my fingers don't go numb I just don't feel like I'm getting into the spirit of the thing. Perhaps I should have two shops: One in Australia where winter is summer and one in North America where summer is winter? Since I make so much money selling ukuleles I can afford to have my own private jet and travel between my two shops... Speaking of downtime and servicing vital equipment, I really need to change out my band saw blade. It is time. I truly dread this chore. Plus I don't really know what the dimension of the damn thing are which means I need to take the old one off and measure it before I can order a new one. Somewhere between 80 and 100 inches is all I know. I love my bandsaw, but I do not enjoy servicing it. These are the things we do in winter.

  7. #7
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    When you find out the blade length...get a marker pen and write the size on the inside of the saw somewhere then you won't have to measure it any more
    http://ukulele-innovation.tripod.com ebay i/d squarepeg_3000

  8. #8
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    With full tension on the current blade, measure...

    The radius (R) of each wheel (a 14" wheel would = R 7") multiplied by 3.14 Then multiply that x 2 (since you have two wheels)

    The distance between the center of the hubs of the two wheels (D) x 2

    (R x 3.14) x 2 + (2 x D) = Saw blade length.

    So on a 14" basic saw where the wheel hubs are 27" apart:
    (7 x 3.14 = 21.98 x 2 = 43.96) + (2 x 27= 54) = 97.96 (98 inch blade)
    Rodney Paul Adams

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by RPA_Ukuleles View Post
    With full tension on the current blade, measure...

    The radius (R) of each wheel (a 14" wheel would = R 7") multiplied by 3.14 Then multiply that x 2 (since you have two wheels)

    The distance between the center of the hubs of the two wheels (D) x 2

    (R x 3.14) x 2 + (2 x D) = Saw blade length.

    So on a 14" basic saw where the wheel hubs are 27" apart:
    (7 x 3.14 = 21.98 x 2 = 43.96) + (2 x 27= 54) = 97.96 (98 inch blade)
    Thanks for the tip. Here is another method that I think I'm going to use: Take off the blade. Take it to a flat spot like your shop floor. Hold the blade down on the floor with your foot and mark the blade and floor with a black marker. Then roll the blade along the floor until the black mark touches the floor again and make another black mark on the floor. Measure between the two black marks and you have your radius and thus your blade length.

    How did I ruin my blade? Cutting 30 year old blocks of Gaboon west African ebony. Really, really beautiful stuff. Totally jet black with no grain lines. In a way I hate ebony. Looks and feels really nice but absolutely destroys my steel tools. Not only is it hard as hell, but contains minerals too. Never again. I score this one as Ebony one point, luthier zero.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by sequoia View Post
    Thanks for the tip. Here is another method that I think I'm going to use: Take off the blade. Take it to a flat spot like your shop floor. Hold the blade down on the floor with your foot and mark the blade and floor with a black marker. Then roll the blade along the floor until the black mark touches the floor again and make another black mark on the floor. Measure between the two black marks and you have your radius and thus your blade length.

    How did I ruin my blade? Cutting 30 year old blocks of Gaboon west African ebony. Really, really beautiful stuff. Totally jet black with no grain lines. In a way I hate ebony. Looks and feels really nice but absolutely destroys my steel tools. Not only is it hard as hell, but contains minerals too. Never again. I score this one as Ebony one point, luthier zero.
    Measure a broken blade.
    Kind Regards
    Dennis

    dpophotography@yahoo.co.nz
    Southern Cross Instruments
    New Zealand

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