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Thread: Can I really learn to...

  1. #1
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    Default Can I really learn to...

    cram three fingers close enough together to play a clean D chord on my sweet soprano? I have average-to-small size hands and I play violin, but now that I am trying to learn more than C-F-G7, I can't seem to play a good D chord. Would it be easier on a concert size, or if I just keep trying will it happen some day?

  2. #2
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    You can barre it (usually with your middle finger), arching up and over the bottom A-string. Or you can do a hybrid where you barre the top two strings with your middle finger and add your ring finger onto the 2nd fret, E-string. I see people squeeze three fingers on the same fret and do it, but it never made much sense to me.
    Brad Bordessa
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  3. #3
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    I'm with Brad, although I use my ring finger to barre the GCE. It takes a bit of practice. I have to place my finger such that only the very tip frets the G so that I can get enough arch to not mute the A.

  4. #4
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    I play it with my pinkie, ring finger, and middle finger. The pinkie gives me just enough room to smash them all three in there. But it just takes time.
    I don't want to live in a world that is linear.

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  5. #5
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    Another way to play it is to use your middle finger on the G string, your index finger on the C string and your ring finger on the E string.

    The advantage of playing it this way is that if you need to play an A chord, you slide your index finger up one fret and lift your ring finger off.

    If you want to play an F#M from a D, you just slide your index finger up one fret and you're there.
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tabbycat View Post
    Can I really learn to cram three fingers close enough together to play a clean D chord on my sweet soprano?
    Yes

    Quote Originally Posted by Tabbycat View Post
    Would it be easier on a concert size
    Yes

    Quote Originally Posted by Tabbycat View Post
    If I just keep trying will it happen some day?
    Yes

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
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    Yes you can.

    Try this way first:

    First concentrate getting x220, that is fretting C end E strings properly and with the index (or whatever finger that is left free) it is ok if it is a bit off sideways to just mute the G string.
    This will sound just as good. In time you will most likely learn to fit properly with 3 fingers.

  8. #8
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    I have big fingers, but get best tone without a barre on the D chord. I see some recommend (all on 2nd fret) pointer on G, middle on C and ring finger on E, all in a line. For the life of me, can't get a good clean tone that way.

    I play it as I learned the A chord on guitar (again, all on 2nd fret): pointer on C string, middle on G and ring on E. I find I can more easily scrunch the middle and ring fingers up against the pointer on the C string, they wrap right around, and I get great leverage. Rings clean and true for me, which I never thought it would, bringing that shape from guitar to a tiny uke fret. YMMV.

    D chord.jpg
    Last edited by Ukecaster; 02-26-2018 at 06:47 PM.

  9. #9
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    There's also barre D on 2225. I use that sometimes.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tabbycat View Post
    cram three fingers close enough together to play a clean D chord on my sweet soprano? I have average-to-small size hands and I play violin, but now that I am trying to learn more than C-F-G7, I can't seem to play a good D chord. Would it be easier on a concert size, or if I just keep trying will it happen some day?
    When I first started to play I too struggled but eventually found a way that would and does work for me. Briefly reading through the thread I don’t think anyone else describes my (triangular) method, but it’s good to have several to choose from and what Eynowd and then Ukecaster suggest is effectively near the same but with a slight difference in style.

    The G7 chord is simple enough in form, basically it’s a triangle shape and that, slightly modified, is what I move across to help me play the D chord. Place your index finger on the C string just behind the first fret, place your ring finger on the the E string just in front of the second fret and then place your middle finger on the G string just in front of the second fret. That’s a flattened triangular shape. When I move from the D to the D7 chord I use my little finger on the A string, but otherwise it’s easiest to play the D7 with a Barr. A Barr for the D chord (as mentioned above by Mopman) works for me too, Barr across all the second fret with your first finger and use your little finger for the A string and the fifth fret.

    I find it helpful, from time to time, to pluck each string in turn to check that they are properly fretted by my carefully positioned fingers. The other important thing is to ensure that your Uke is properly set up, if the unfretted strings are too high above the fret board then they will be difficult to press down properly.

    I hope that the above is a help and welcome to the world of Uke playing, may you have much fun with your Uke.

    Edit. One of the really useful things, to me, about this thread is being reminded of techniques that I no longer use but should try again, and another is being supplied with useful techniques and lines of thought that hadn’t yet found their way to me. . Never stop learning and never stop refining technique.
    Last edited by Graham Greenbag; 02-27-2018 at 01:47 AM.

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