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Thread: Fishing line

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wildestcat View Post
    Interesting topic - having just strung up a soprano and a concert with my usual brand of Living Water fluorocarbon strings, I am a bit underwhelmed by the C string on the soprano. LW soprano & concert sets are the same gauges for all strings, and whilst the tenor set is slightly heavier in the G and A, it uses the same 0.74mm dia for the C string. The Daddario set has the same gauges as LW for the G, E and A but a significantly heavier 0.81 mm for the C. The LW C sounds fine to me on the concert, but I think I will be experimenting with a heavier C for the Soprano.
    I never liked any nylon nor fluoro nor Aquila string for the C string on soprano, as they all seemed way too low tension and had a flubby-tubby sound for me and not well-balanced for volume with the other strings (too soft).

    I've tried a few 0.027" and 0.030" wound strings for C on soprano and liked that much better. These are pretty standard gauges used for the 4th and 5th strings on a classical guitar, and will be thinner than most, if not all unwound C strings, yet giving a bit more tension.

    Maybe try the wound strings and see how it works for you. They are sold both online and in shops as single strings ($1-2 USD) so you do not have to invest in a whole classical guitar string set to test them out.
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  2. #32
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    Thanks for the wound string suggestion - I would never have thought to try! I already use a Savarez high tension classical guitar wound D string for the low G on my tenor reso, so I've got some spares in stock. I'll give one a try on the soprano.
    Cheers
    Paul

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wildestcat View Post
    Thanks for the wound string suggestion - I would never have thought to try! I already use a Savarez high tension classical guitar wound D string for the low G on my tenor reso, so I've got some spares in stock. I'll give one a try on the soprano.
    A high-tension ukulele 'G' string (aka guitar 'D' string) which is 0.030" dia may in fact have too much tension tuned up a 4th from G3 to C4, even on the shorter scale soprano.

    On a tenor (17" scale length) doing this would add approximately 9-10 lbs of string tension from the single string, on top of the total tension from the other 3 strings.

    On soprano scale, it would not be as much tension as on a tenor, but tenors are typically built to handle 40-45 lbs of total string tension, whereas most sopranos are more like 23-27 lbs of total string tension (judging by the tensions of various different string set info published by string makers, as well as my own hands-on experience with more than 100 different sets of strings over the past 4.5 yrs))

    If the instrument is not built/braced for higher tension, you could end up damaging the instrument.

    So you may want to take that into account, and/or go with a classical string that is NOT high-tension but normal-tension and/or thinner diameter closer to 0.026"-0.027"... otherwise/especially if using a high-tension string for the C string on soprano

    I have written extensively about strings here on UU in the past, and you can see some of those threads and learn what I had previously written by clicking on the FAQ link in my forum signature below.
    This ═╣FAQ link╠═ will help you learn about many things.
    You should click it, as the answers are waiting for you.

  4. #34
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    Thanks Booli. I built the soprano with a centre fan and a strings-through-top bridge, so whilst not overly worried about adding more tension maybe I'll try a lighter gauge first!

    To be fair, it has only been strung up for a couple of days and after a spot of playing-in today it is sounding better, so I'll wait a while before trying anything different.
    Cheers
    Paul

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wildestcat View Post
    Thanks Booli. I built the soprano with a centre fan and a strings-through-top bridge, so whilst not overly worried about adding more tension maybe I'll try a lighter gauge first!

    To be fair, it has only been strung up for a couple of days and after a spot of playing-in today it is sounding better, so I'll wait a while before trying anything different.
    Sure thing. I'm glad to help.

    When restringing guitars or ukuleles of various sizes and scale lengths, especially if with different gauges of strings (different than what was previously installed) which will have different tension on the neck and bridge, I've noticed that it can take from a few hours to a few days before the stress from string tension and the response from the wood will balance out to a point of 'rest'.

    This is not to say that tension stops completely, but the forces applied (as vectors) on the parts of the instrument that are meant to flex in response, have a gradual effect on the instrument, and do not achieve this resting/working state immediately upon tuning to pitch.

    The strings need to stretch to their settled tension at concert pitch, which happens quicker by string vibration (i.e., actually PLAYING). Some folks actively pull on the strings to stretch them, which I have personally found to cause weak spots and to negatively impact intonation. Other folks tune up 2-3 semitones and keep retuning every few hours as an alternate method.

    Aside from the strings stretching to settle, as they do so, the forces on the instrument are not constant, since the string will be taught and then relax, over time as you are retuning it.

    This happens every time you re-tune.

    As such, the instrument itself is going to flex in various ways.

    In my experience, it is not until there is an equilibrium of the strings settled at tension for concert pitch, that is in balance with the flex of the instrument, under this specific and 'final tension' that you can accurately judge how the strings will sound and feel, as well as the true nature of the sound of the strings on this specific instrument, and thus the overall sound of the instrument.

    (All of also this applies to brand new strings on a brand new, just-built instrument which has never had strings on it before.)

    For me, this can take anywhere from 3-7 days, and about 12 hours of playing with active string vibration when a new set of strings is installed. This varies depending upon how attentive I am and how much play time I can invest (for I am just a player and not a builder, but I try to practice an hour per day).

    There are other methods to all of this, but this is what has worked well for me.

    As they say, YMMV.
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