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Thread: What Percentage $$?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
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    Catskill Mountains, NY
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    Default What Percentage $$?

    When you're selling a ukulele or buying used, have you ever thought in terms of percentages? If a ukulele sold for $500 new, and you were willing to pay 65%, that would make your limit $325. Looking at some sales vs street prices new, it seems that many are in the 60 - 75% bracket. This might help me to resist paying or bidding more than I should.

    I'm watching one on ebay now. The currest price is $959, and it's bid up to $577 with nine minutes left.
    https://www.ebay.com/itm/302653649593?ul_noapp=true

    Of course, if you just fall in love with a uke, and you must have it, then the sky's the limit. : )

  2. #2
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    Apr 2017
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    From what I see you can’t usefully expect a particular mark down for second hand, it all depends on the make and model, etc. I wouldn’t recommend it as an investment strategy but some Ukes even improve in price.

    To an extent it’s all a matter of supply and demand plus desirability. The cheaper mass produced Ukes tend to take a hammering, but something ‘nice’, rarer and in really good condition fairs better - well that’s just my observation. Trust has a value too, folk on here tend to be straight with each other and that gives confidence (which has a value).

    Good luck with this. At the end of the day a Uke is worth what someone is prepared to pay for it .

  3. #3
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    Jul 2017
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    Quote Originally Posted by Graham Greenbag View Post
    From what I see you can’t usefully expect a particular mark down for second hand, it all depends on the make and model, etc. I wouldn’t recommend it as an investment strategy but some Ukes even improve in price.

    To an extent it’s all a matter of supply and demand plus desirability. The cheaper mass produced Ukes tend to take a hammering, but something ‘nice’, rarer and in really good condition fairs better - well that’s just my observation. Trust has a value too, folk on here tend to be straight with each other and that gives confidence (which has a value).

    Good luck with this. At the end of the day a Uke is worth what someone is prepared to pay for it .
    Well said, and seconded.
    Looks like the final price was $555, and for that ukulele someone is going to be happy.
    Playing my Magic Fluke and grinning like a fool!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
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    Quote Originally Posted by maki66 View Post
    Well said, and seconded.
    Looks like the final price was $555, and for that ukulele someone is going to be happy.
    I think that was a reasonable price for buyer and seller. I'll keep percentages in mind when I buy and sell in the future, since that's where I plan to be living. : )

  5. #5

    Default

    Hey, I was looking at the same uke up for auction. I just didn't want to go higher in price as the case listed was actually a gig bag, not a hard case. Once you added in the $40+ for shipping, and then buying a fairly acceptable hard case for it, it would come to over $650 - still better than the cost of a new model without a case, though!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Arizona
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    Default

    You can't really rely on percentages, any instrument is worth whatever someone is willing to pay for it. In my case, they're always worth more when I buy them than when I sell them...
    Just Play

    Sopranos: 1st uke, Lanikai soprano LU-11 - Aquilas | 30's Martin style 0 - Martins | Fender Piha'eu - Worth Browns | Lanikai banjolele - Worth Browns
    Concerts: Kanile'a K-2 CP - Living Water | Islander AC-4 - Living Water | Ohana CK-35-8 - Living Water | Kala KA-ACP-CT - Living Water, low G
    UBass: Kala Exotic Mahogany - Road Toad Pahoehoe

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
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    Redding, CA
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    I agree with UkerDanno. The marketplace can be affected by many variables. I try to list at a fair price because if you list too high, no one will even read the listing. Some people will never pay the listing price even if it's fair. I've bought and sold on ebay. I've got bargains and also sold an instrument once for a low price because I didn't set a reserve. Supply and demand come into play, but sometimes it's just plain luck that your in the right place at the right time.
    Stan

    Mainland Mahogany Tenor Cutaway
    Mainland Concert, Red Cedar/Rosewood
    Flea Natural w/tenor neck
    OU-53 Oscar Schmidt Baritone (GCEA, Low G)
    OU-6W Oscar Schmidt Tenor (wide neck)

  8. #8
    Join Date
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    Pricing of a used ukulele is determined by so many factors. If it is a high end uke like one of the K brands, less then 2 years old and in excellent shape then 25%-30% below retail is fair. If it is a very common brand that is low priced and abundant like a Kala or Ohana then 30%-40% off is more the norm. But the sellers idea of "excellent" condition and the buyers idea could be very far apart.

    Then you get into time of year. If I am listing a Pono pro classical that sold new for $1200 in January when everyone is in debt from Christmas I will have to discount it farther then in April when people have their tax returns and have money to spend.

    Because of this when I sell a uke here I always remove the price from the listing. Some people have been vocal in their disaproval of this practice. But each transaction can be different and if I listed it for $950 and agreed to a private offer of $850 then the listed price is no longer relevant.
    Ukuleles.............yes please !!!!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
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    Quote Originally Posted by DownUpDave View Post
    Pricing of a used ukulele is determined by so many factors. If it is a high end uke like one of the K brands, less then 2 years old and in excellent shape then 25%-30% below retail is fair. If it is a very common brand that is low priced and abundant like a Kala or Ohana then 30%-40% off is more the norm. But the sellers idea of "excellent" condition and the buyers idea could be very far apart.

    Then you get into time of year. If I am listing a Pono pro classical that sold new for $1200 in January when everyone is in debt from Christmas I will have to discount it farther then in April when people have their tax returns and have money to spend.

    Because of this when I sell a uke here I always remove the price from the listing. Some people have been vocal in their disaproval of this practice. But each transaction can be different and if I listed it for $950 and agreed to a private offer of $850 then the listed price is no longer relevant.
    I'm one of those who prefer sellers leave the listing price (and add the sales price). I look at prior listings to help price anything I want to sell, and I take time of year, location, etc. into consideration as well as listing and sales prices.
    Margaret, classical guitarist gone uke crazy

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    California
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    527

    Default

    I am with DownUpDave on the practice of removing prices from listings. I may sell a uke for well below its market value because I was lucky enough to get a great deal when I bought it. That doesn't mean it's not worth more, it just means I'm paying my good fortune forward. I might offer a uke for a very fair price, but if someone previously listed a similar uke for less than the going rate, it can give potential buyers a misinformed impression of the instrument's actual value. In some cases I may have paid too much for a uke (God knows), and list it optimistically, hoping that someone wants it enough to minimize my losses.
    I understand why one might find it helpful to peruse the prices of closed listings, but I don't understand when they criticize someone for removing the price after the fact. When it comes down to it, it's no one's business except for the two parties involved in the transaction, and it's their decision whether or not to leave that info up.
    As to the original question of the post, it seems to me there are way too many variables (emotion, timing, quality of photos & description, etc.) to depend on any consistent percentage expectation (but then I'm really not a spread-sheet kind of a guy).

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