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Thread: Pin Bridge vs Tie Bridge

  1. #1
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    Default Pin Bridge vs Tie Bridge

    Is there any practical reason to favor a pin bridge over the regular tie bridge? I like the looks, but is that all there is to it?
    Last edited by Jerryc41; 03-10-2018 at 02:06 AM.

  2. #2

    Default

    I'm sure there are more pros and cons, but here are a couple things I can think of that favor, or why I favor, the pin bridge:

    Easier string changes (not that a tie bridge or knot bridge is hard)
    Places more tension on the sound board (better sound board vibration? )
    Less apt to cause a bridge failure (bridge joint failure where glued to sound board)
    Looks Cool!

    Jim
    Current Ukuleles:
    2017 Martin Style 3K Custom Tenor
    2018 Martin 1T IZ Tenor (#576)
    2009 Bean Sprout Banjolele

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ragtop232 View Post
    I'm sure there are more pros and cons, but here are a couple things I can think of that favor, or why I favor, the pin bridge:

    Easier string changes (not that a tie bridge or knot bridge is hard)
    Places more tension on the sound board (better sound board vibration? )
    Less apt to cause a bridge failure (bridge joint failure where glued to sound board)
    Looks Cool!

    Jim
    Thanks. Sounds good to me. I have one with pins, and I'll probably get another.

    I recently read an article explaining that the glued-on bridge is a safety feature. If the uke is dropped or banged, the bridge can pop off, rather than having a more important part get broken by the spring tension.

  4. #4
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    Twin Cities, Minnesota, USA
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    Default

    Well I know it's just my technique (or lack of...) but I find that my forearm rubs on the knots of a tie bridge, which can get pretty irritating. So I would always go for a pin bridge (if available) or if not then a string through bridge. A pin bridge not only makes changing strings easier, but it also makes it a snap to reuse them if you are interested in trying out several types of strings.

  5. #5
    Join Date
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    Default

    I dont have any ukes with a pin bridge, only slotted and tie-bridges.

    For either, and since I am always changing and testing strings, all my strings have knots at the ends, and for a tie-bridge, I do NOT tie them on, but rather put a bead on the end, which goes betw the knot and the string hole in the bridge and just pull the string straight thru, and they work just fine and easy to remove and/or reinstall later.

    Also looks neater to me (going thru with the bead and knot), as well as saving the wood of the tie-block from getting chewed up from indentations caused by the pressure/tension of the string when wrapped around the tie-block.

    I do the same thing with beads on my classical guitars. Steel string acoustics all usually have pin bridges, and I have no issue with them.
    This FAQ link will help you learn about:
    - Magic Fluke Company ukes
    - Pickups, Preamps and Impedance Mismatch
    - Home Recording and Mics
    - String Upgrades
    - iPad Microphones
    - Wolfelele Uke Kit
    - How to string a Baritone uke as a piccolo bass
    - Strings I used for GDAE and CGDA fifths tunings

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
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    Arizona
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ragtop232 View Post
    I'm sure there are more pros and cons, but here are a couple things I can think of that favor, or why I favor, the pin bridge:

    Easier string changes (not that a tie bridge or knot bridge is hard)
    Places more tension on the sound board (better sound board vibration? )
    Less apt to cause a bridge failure (bridge joint failure where glued to sound board)
    Looks Cool!

    Jim
    What he said, especially easy string changes! And amazing looks...I got some rosewood buttons with abalone inserts.
    button.jpg
    Just Play

    Sopranos: 1st uke, Lanikai soprano LU-11 - Aquilas | 30's Martin style 0 - Martins | Fender Piha'eu - Worth Browns | Lanikai banjolele - Worth Browns
    Concerts: Kanile'a K-2 CP - Living Water | Islander AC-4 - Living Water | Ohana CK-35-8 - Living Water | Kala KA-ACP-CT - Living Water, low G
    UBass: Kala Exotic Mahogany - Road Toad Pahoehoe

  7. #7
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    Nov 2015
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    Upper Hale, Surrey/Hants border, UK.
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    Default

    All mine are tie bridges, my preference, except one, & that is slotted.
    Trying to do justice to various musical instruments.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Posts
    27

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Booli View Post
    I dont have any ukes with a pin bridge, only slotted and tie-bridges.

    For either, and since I am always changing and testing strings, all my strings have knots at the ends, and for a tie-bridge, I do NOT tie them on, but rather put a bead on the end, which goes betw the knot and the string hole in the bridge and just pull the string straight thru, and they work just fine and easy to remove and/or reinstall later.

    Also looks neater to me (going thru with the bead and knot), as well as saving the wood of the tie-block from getting chewed up from indentations caused by the pressure/tension of the string when wrapped around the tie-block.

    I do the same thing with beads on my classical guitars. Steel string acoustics all usually have pin bridges, and I have no issue with them.
    Are you using metal beads? glass? plastic? I'm curious to try this as I have a trillion beads to chose from.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    Michigan, US
    Posts
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    Quote Originally Posted by tstarky View Post
    Are you using metal beads? glass? plastic? I'm curious to try this as I have a trillion beads to chose from.
    Yes! I'm interested in hearing more about this too, Booli. :-)
    Margaret, classical guitarist gone uke crazy

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by tstarky View Post
    Are you using metal beads? glass? plastic? I'm curious to try this as I have a trillion beads to chose from.
    Quote Originally Posted by twokatmew View Post
    Yes! I'm interested in hearing more about this too, Booli. :-)
    I bought all kinds of shapes and sizes of a shiny-grey hematite-looking beads that they had at Michaels. I think they are glass or ceramic. Some are 3mm spheres, some 2mm spheres and others are 1.5mm thick and 3mm square flat beads, and others yet are flattish elliptical and 3mm or 5mm diameter and a few are 3mm cubes. All the same color.

    Some have smaller holes thru than others. I've used different beads from this collection for everything from 0.0185" fluoro (Worth CL "A" string) up to 0.065" sliver-plated copper wound over nylon classical guitar strings to give you the range of the hole sizes.

    I will try to put up some photos, but just taking the pictures would be a kind of big project and may not get to the photos for a couple of days....
    This FAQ link will help you learn about:
    - Magic Fluke Company ukes
    - Pickups, Preamps and Impedance Mismatch
    - Home Recording and Mics
    - String Upgrades
    - iPad Microphones
    - Wolfelele Uke Kit
    - How to string a Baritone uke as a piccolo bass
    - Strings I used for GDAE and CGDA fifths tunings

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