Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 18 of 18

Thread: Strings for switching between high and low G

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Pickering, ON, Canada
    Posts
    4,589

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by UkerDanno View Post
    Try the fremont Soloist low G...
    https://www.ebay.com/i/173184004566?chn=ps
    If you want to go this route the Fremont is your best bet. Yes you can switch out just the one string but as another reply stated you have to wait for each string to restretch everytime you switch them.
    Ukuleles.............yes please !!!!

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Catskill Mountains, NY
    Posts
    801

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Nickie View Post
    Personally, I think that'd be a pain in me arse.
    Get another uke, keep one strung up lo G and the other hi g.
    You'll be happier.
    Perfect solution. Buy the time you go through Amazon picking out strings and then pay to get them shipped, installed, tuned, etc., you might as well buy a nice Kamaka low-G and be done with it.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Catskill Mountains, NY
    Posts
    801

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by NoyBoy98 View Post
    Yea, Iíve thought of that. Was thinking maybe a cheap Kmise or Vtab concert as a 2nd uke. I donít mind switching strings for right now though.
    Cheap ukes can be hit or miss. You'll find that you won't want to play the cheap one, so it will be a waste of money. Read the reviews on Got a Ukulele, and you will see some some good and some bad reviews for the cheapies.

  4. #14

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerryc41 View Post
    Cheap ukes can be hit or miss. You'll find that you won't want to play the cheap one, so it will be a waste of money. Read the reviews on Got a Ukulele, and you will see some some good and some bad reviews for the cheapies.
    Oh trust me, I’ve gone through my fair share of his reviews and all very helpful. It’s how I found out about Vtab (his brand of the year for 2017). Kmise considerations come from other user experiences here on this board.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    2,265

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Croaky Keith View Post
    Once you put a low G string on, you won't want that high string any more anyway.........
    NOT!
    Just Play

    Sopranos: 1st uke, Lanikai soprano LU-11 - Aquilas | 30's Martin style 0 - Martins | Fender Piha'eu - Worth Browns | Lanikai banjolele - Worth Browns
    Concerts: Kanile'a K-2 CP - Living Water | Islander AC-4 - Living Water | Ohana CK-35-8 - Living Water | Kala KA-ACP-CT - Living Water, low G
    UBass: Kala Exotic Mahogany - Road Toad Pahoehoe

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    NYC
    Posts
    201

    Default

    Having 2 different ukes is the solution. (this is also one way that UAS starts off)

    Repeatedly changing/alternating the G string on the same uke is a recipe for disappointment. Nobody does this unless you are a glutton for punishment.

    Others have commented elsewhere on UU about the technical aspects of this, which I cannot explain myself right now.

    You can get a new Makala MK-C concert uke for like $62, or new Makala MK-T tenor uke for $75 almost everywhere and will give you a much better result, as well as the ability to try them back-to back with one uke in hi-G and one uke in low-g...
    -Joe......Have uke, will travel...

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Kansastan
    Posts
    13,949

    Default

    Wound low G strings will sound better and fit better at the nut. They will also break quite easily. I’d be surprised it it lasted through the second swap.
    Dig Infinity!

  8. #18

    Default

    As others have stated:

    -It's not very practical to keep switching between low-G and high-G on the same uke often.
    In fact, it may accelerate wear and tear on the instrument a bit.

    -Probably better to either settle on one tuning long term (provided you are able to find a clear preference) or have 2 ukes tuned differently.
    My personal solution to this is have a Soprano tuned in high-G and have a Tenor (or Concert) tuned in low-G.
    For some reason, this duo seems appropriate, like that's how the ukuleles are meant to be tuned.

    -Inexpensive ukes doesn't necessarily mean bad quality. If you know what you're looking for, and perhaps have some skill (or interest) in doing basic setups, you can find excellent value and enjoyment in cheaper ukes.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •