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Thread: Concertinas?

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Croaky Keith View Post
    I'd often thought about a squeeze box too, but they cost a lot of money, & when I took a look into the workings, I had a re think, they are quite complicated inside.
    (I can't imagine you getting anything decent for $100.)

    Harmonicas have the same sort of sound, they both use metal reeds to create the sound, & that is what I went for, with the advantage that they are pocketable too.
    (A chromatic harmonica would be my suggestion.)

    I've just recently started with (tin) whistles, they're cheap, & fun to play.
    I doubt you'll find a chromatic harmonica that's any good for much under $100.

  2. #12
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    The Swan 1040, or maybe, Hohner Chrometta, will get you going, & are quite reasonable, in both sound & quality, (I have both, as well as my better ones).
    Trying to do justice to various musical instruments.

  3. #13
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    I haven't seen the Swan 1040, but I'll keep my eye open for one.
    The Hohner Chrometta 10 hole is close to $180 in Canada. Is there a cheaper model? Is this the one you mean?

    Hohner Chrometta.jpg
    Last edited by Jim Yates; 06-11-2019 at 02:00 AM.

  4. #14
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    I too have been drawn to the concertina but have not moved forward for the very same reasons. They were a bit more expensive than I expected for a starter. I also am leery about looking for a “good buy” online, when I know nothing about the instrument. I am retired and could find the time to learn it, but I am already involved with playing uke and learning guitar, tg and mandolin. I enjoy them all and not interested in giving up any just to concentrate on one.

    My other thought was that as I am getting older, I would like to have an instrument I can noodle with when my string playing days are over. I worked in a nursing home years ago and have fond memories of a wheelchair-bound gent in his nineties that played his concertina all day long. It was a joy to hear and kept him positive and engaged well into his very advanced years. I would love to have this. I thought of harmonica too but I think respiratory issues might cut playing career short and I’d like to go for longevity. I don’t think I’m financially ready to jump into a concertina right now, but I can see one on the horizon.
    Last edited by bunnyf; 06-11-2019 at 04:13 AM.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Yates View Post
    I haven't seen the Swan 1040, but I'll keep my eye open for one.
    The Hohner Chrometta 10 hole is close to $180 in Canada. Is there a cheaper model? Is this the one you mean?
    Hohner Chrometta.jpg
    Yes, that's the Chrometta, lovely tone, comes in 8/10/12/14 hole versions, (but has an awkward mouthpiece for some).
    (I have both the 10 & 14 - these are 'orchestra' tuned, meaning they have a couple of extra lower notes.)

    Another 'Swan' type is made by Qi Mei, & is said to be a decent player.
    Last edited by Croaky Keith; 06-11-2019 at 08:59 AM.
    Trying to do justice to various musical instruments.

  6. #16
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    There are two types of harmonica relevant.
    There are in fact three basic types of harmonicas, diatonic, chromatic, & tremolo.
    Trying to do justice to various musical instruments.

  7. #17
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    Accordeon is I think more usual than concertinas or bandoneons.

    Here in Finland we have the 2 row accordeons, that give different note when pulling or pushing. More common is the 5 row accordeons, that really can excel in virtuosity.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jarmo_S View Post
    Accordeon is I think more usual than concertinas or bandoneons.

    Here in Finland we have the 2 row accordeons, that give different note when pulling or pushing. More common is the 5 row accordeons, that really can excel in virtuosity.
    The two row accordions you describe are known as Diatonic or DBAs (diatonic button accordions).

    The five row are Chromatic and have the same note on the push and pull, or CBAs (chromatic button accordions).

    https://www.buttonbox.com/
    Playing my Magic Fluke and grinning like a fool!

  9. #19
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  10. #20
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    I got a Trinity College English concertina about a decade ago. It was just under $300, the least expensive English (same note on push and pull) style I could find. The Anglos (diatonic in one or two keys) were a lot less expensive, but I couldn't seem to figure them out and I like being able to play in all keys. The English concertina is chromatic.

    TC English concertina.jpg

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