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Thread: mummified Necks

  1. #11
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    Stockton on Tees..North East UK.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael N. View Post
    Dampen the upper side (prior to gluing) to counteract the cupping.
    Or use non water based glue...Epoxy perhaps
    http://ukulele-innovation.tripod.com ebay i/d squarepeg_3000 Email timmsken@hotmail.com

    If you can believe that moving images and sound, can fly through empty space across the universe and be seen and heard on a box in your living room ?.. then you can believe in anything.

  2. #12
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    May 2018
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    Fort Lauderdale, FL, USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Timbuck View Post
    Or use non water based glue...Epoxy perhaps
    He, or someone else, may need to remove it at some point.

    I would recommend Titebond or hide glue. I've always glued the slotted fretboard on first and then the frets, but I've only built guitars. Maybe uke builders do it differently due to the thing being more fragile?
    Regards,
    Michael
    Brüko Soprano #4

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by mmn View Post
    He, or someone else, may need to remove it at some point.

    I would recommend Titebond or hide glue. I've always glued the slotted fretboard on first and then the frets, but I've only built guitars. Maybe uke builders do it differently due to the thing being more fragile?
    I said that co's it's what Rick Turner uses on his instruments..
    ..I myself use Titebond.

    Here is an interest thread on the subject, http://www.anzlf.com/viewtopic.php?t=395
    Last edited by Timbuck; 06-24-2018 at 05:00 AM.
    http://ukulele-innovation.tripod.com ebay i/d squarepeg_3000 Email timmsken@hotmail.com

    If you can believe that moving images and sound, can fly through empty space across the universe and be seen and heard on a box in your living room ?.. then you can believe in anything.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    May 2011
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    Greenville, VA.
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    I used to use 5 minute epoxy to glue on fingerboards, but sometimes I can't work that fast. Now I use 1/2 hour epoxy. No problem getting it back off if necessary. I put a thick caul on top to make sure the neck stays flat until the glue cures.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    So. Oregon
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    1,684

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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael N. View Post
    Dampen the upper side (prior to gluing) to counteract the cupping.
    Or use epoxy.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Posts
    29

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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael N. View Post
    Dampen the upper side (prior to gluing) to counteract the cupping.
    Good idea. I'll give it a try. It's scary pounding those last frets in over the body. And I'm "hide glue only"... due to some mental issue.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
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    Bellevue, KY
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    Quote Originally Posted by hoji View Post
    Noticed you have the frets installed prior to gluing down. The time I've tries this, the fretboard swelled up from the glue and cupped (in the bad direction), presumably due to the frets preventing the top side from expanding as much as the bottom side. And ended up getting gaps.
    This jig keeps everything flat during glue-up. I've had to make all new ones since changing to a radiused fretboard. After I attach a hinged headstock caul, they'll also be used for final neck shaping. That's a sopranino neck, which fits on the soprano jig. I cut the fret slots with a thin kerf finishing blade. The pallet bands are very strong and easy to work with. Lots of clamping pressure. Works great.

    neck fretboard jig.jpg
    Last edited by Diogenes Blue; 08-28-2019 at 06:39 AM.
    Victor Jones
    Blue Frog Ukuleles

    Bellevue, KY
    bluefrogvic@gmail.com
    http://bluefrogukes.weebly.com/index.html

  8. #18
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    Apr 2009
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    New Zealand
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    Quote Originally Posted by Titchtheclown View Post
    I do pretty much the same thing only I use an old bicycle inner tube cut into strips. Not because they're better or anything I just had an old bicycle inner tube laying around my shed.
    I use the same thing, though I am about to splash out on a new tube, the old stips are losing their stretch.
    Kind Regards
    Dennis

    dponeil@xtra.co.nz
    Southern Cross Banjo Ukes & Ukuleles
    Proudly Hand Crafted in
    New Zealand.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Location
    Central Texas
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    58

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    I just lightly sand both surfaces to be glued with 40 grit sandpaper then spread a thin coat of Elmer's wood glue evenly on both the neck and the fretboard with frets in place and let it sit for a few minutes so the glue soaks into the wood well and begins to thicken. Then I carefully lay a long flat piece of hardwood like walnut as wide as the fretboard and place it on top of the fretboard after placing the fretboard on the neck and then start firmly clamping at the nut and working my way up the neck. This guarantees flat placement and level frets. Then I let it dry for at least one day. I have never had a fretboard buckle or cup and I never had to level the frets after a glue up. Just my 2 cents.... Your mileage may vary. There are many ways to skin a cat and this was mine.

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