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Thread: The E- Chord

  1. #1
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    Default The E- Chord

    Having started this thread I thought an update appropriate. I can now do an E chord - Barre second fret and squash wedding finger across 4th fret GCE strings.

    Took months to get it to sing. Still no expert but just about acceptable and it does sound just like an E most of the time. Still got a bad habit of substituting E7. But It's a qualified success - thanks to this website and all the help from its frequentors!

    Stew

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by levanthai View Post
    Having started this thread I thought an update appropriate. I can now do an E chord - Barre second fret and squash wedding finger across 4th fret GCE strings.

    Took months to get it to sing. Still no expert but just about acceptable and it does sound just like an E most of the time. Still got a bad habit of substituting E7. But It's a qualified success - thanks to this website and all the help from its frequentors!

    Stew
    You mean 4442? Perhaps you should try 4447. In my opinion much easier to handle.
    Greetings from Berlin, Germany
    Last edited by bigfellow; 09-12-2018 at 08:34 AM.

  3. #3
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    Second on the 4447.
    Keep Strummin'

  4. #4
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    Default

    Not long ago I started playing my uke with an acoustic group that meets in a park Sundays at noon for two hours. I joined them because during the week I play bass uke with The CC Strummers, so the Sunday group gives me a chance to play my ukes regularly with others. They're made up of mainly guitars, where E is a very common key. Since most all of the songs The CC Strummers play are in uke friendly keys, I didn't play the normal E chord (when I played my uke with them), but with the acoustic group, I had to. So I took a little time to warm up to the E using 2-4-4-4, index finger on 2, middle finger on 4 and ring finger barre 4 & 4, didn't take me long at all to get used to it. One other member of the Sunday group plays uke and she uses 4 fingers for her E chord.


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    Last edited by kohanmike; 09-12-2018 at 08:37 PM.

  5. #5
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    Like kohanmike, I play in my church band with guitars every Sunday. Many of the songs include the dreaded E. Sometimes E7 works, sometimes it doesn’t. Some of the songs have an E alternating with Esus4, and I often use E5 (2044)instead of E. It sounds good and is easy to alternate with Esus4. So 2044 instead of 2444. Playing with guitars definitely has forced me to embrace the E, at least a little bit.
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  6. #6
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    I usually use open position E (1402) and have found using it it to be a good exercise in finger dexterity. Rather than bunching your fingers up at the fourth fret or placing a partial barre there, it requires staggered fingers with the middle finger on the top string and the index and ring fingers both reaching over to the other side of the fretboard.

    Congrats on getting the E! Put it in some progressions and do yourself proud!

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by MopMan View Post
    I usually use open position E (1402) and have found using it it to be a good exercise in finger dexterity. Rather than bunching your fingers up at the fourth fret or placing a partial barre there, it requires staggered fingers with the middle finger on the top string and the index and ring fingers both reaching over to the other side of the fretboard.

    Congrats on getting the E! Put it in some progressions and do yourself proud!
    As an open chord for strumming I much prefer the easy 1x02 2 finger chord (muting the C string with the index finger, it is in the E chord sticky), it sounds the same.

    But as a movable chord the standard 4442 is also important. With guitar the second most important barre chord form is x24442 for B ( because tuning is different), with index finger while playing the second fret notes also mutes the 6th string. Why it is so important, the so called A shape? It is that because it has the root note note on 5th string. We don't have that note in our ukes, so in that sense 4442 is a bit less important, but anyways good one to be able to play. And it is easier to play than the guitar's second most important barre chord.

  8. #8
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    4442, 4447... or, learn to transpose songs into different keys
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  9. #9
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    I will often just play 444x as a barre ( the x being the muted top string). Just cos there’s 4 strings doesn’t mean you have to play ‘em all

  10. #10
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    I do the same as One Man And His Uke. If you have a re-entrant tuned uke, 4442 is giving you two B notes of exactly the same pitch, so you're not really missing anything by muting the first string.
    In the key of A, the E7 chord will usually work just as well or better than the E.
    If the song is a jazzy one with some altered chords, the E6 (4444) will often fit really well as a substitution for the E.
    The 4447 form has been mentioned and is easy to do, but it doesn't always go as well with open, 1st position chords
    Last edited by Jim Yates; 09-14-2018 at 07:07 AM.

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