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Thread: Warp or Not

  1. #1
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    Default Warp or Not

    I have a Yamaha CS40 Classical Guitar and I want to remove strings 5 and 6 and play it as one would a baritone ukulele or tenor guitar tuned D G B E. Will the removal of two strings cause the neck to warp or cause any other damage. There is no truss rod in this guitar.

  2. #2
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    I know this doesn't answer your question, but you already have the 'extra' strings - why not use them to play bass notes?

    Folks in my uke groups have told me they like the bass - especially when there's no bass player that day.

  3. #3
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    In short, I don't believe an problems would come by removing the 5th and 6th strings due to the lower tension of the classical strings. Yamaha classical necks are pretty beefy.

    An alternative - I've converted some guitars to four stringers by utilizing string slots 2 thru 5 (removing strings 1 and 6) and arranging the strings as desired for what tunings I want. This keeps a more even, symmetrical tension on the neck, top, and bridge. However, I have done this only on steel string guitars for a make shift tenor guitar and not on one of my classical. Of course the steel stringers have a narrower nut width - a standard classical neck might have too much reach to get to the fifth string than you want.

    An another alternate, relative to ampeep's post, I have a classical that I tune strings 5 and 6 as drone strings. Really, it's simply just tuning the 6th string to drop D. The result is DAD for strings 6, 5, and 4. I play the melody on the top four strings and use the fifth and sixth strings as drones. This sounds great for the Celtic music I like to play.

    Just some ideas that hopefully you might be able to benefit from.
    Last edited by bsfloyd; 09-15-2018 at 01:56 AM.

  4. #4
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    An another alternate, relative to ampeep's post, I have a classical that I tune strings 5 and 6 as drone strings. Really, it's simply just tuning the 6th string to drop D. The result is DAD for strings 6, 5, and 4. I play the melody on the top four strings and use the fifth and sixth strings as drones. This sounds great for the Celtic music I like to play.

    I had previously thought of ampee's idea of just playing and leaving the two bass strings on the guitar. I just thought it might be easier to play if I got the extra strings out of the way. Your idea of drones is good. I do not know, yet, how to add n or apply drones but I love to play Irish tunes. Thanks guys.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnnysmash View Post
    I had previously thought of ampee's idea of just playing and leaving the two bass strings on the guitar. I just thought it might be easier to play if I got the extra strings out of the way. Your idea of drones is good. I do not know, yet, how to add n or apply drones but I love to play Irish tunes. Thanks guys.
    The two drone strings work very well when playing in the key of D major. The sixth string low D and the fifth string A, and then the fourth string D (octave above the low D sixth string) make a nice 1-5-1 pitch interval. Many Celtic tunes are written in D major. Just take one of your guitars and tune the sixth string low E down one full step to D. Then play an open D chord with all six strings. The sound is very full. This also works for the key of D minor, because the 1 and 5 and the same in both keys.

  6. #6
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    Drone strings - that sounds pretty cool! Kinda like bagpipes or sitar. 😄

    One day my friend's mother who is originally from Ireland, heard someone attempting to play the bagpipes. After a while, she went over & gave him tips.

  7. #7
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    I tried playing yesterday in drop D tuning and it sounded great. Very full and mellow. Now that brings up a question. If I continue to play the chord shapes for the key of D but I capo on the 2nd fret, am I now in the key of E?

  8. #8
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    I'm glad you are liking the sound! Playing a D chord with a capo on fret two will indeed sound an E chord.

  9. #9
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    Thanks to both of you. You guys are great. Now off to practice. Thank you.

  10. #10
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    Good to hear that you'll be able to use the two 'extra' strings on your Yamaha. Have fun with your new tuning!

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