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Thread: Learning to read standard notation - need easy sheet music

  1. #1
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    Default Learning to read standard notation - need easy sheet music

    I am on a hunt for fairly easy sheet music with standard notation so that I can practice sight reading music as a way of applying my newly acquired knowledge of scales on the low G uke.

    Broadly speaking, I can read music, however, specifically with the uke I have not been playing notes on the scale. I have been strumming chords and reading tab. But now I would like to actually read standard notation and get some practice with playing specific notes up and down the fretboard.

    Can you suggest some resources to help me move towards my goal of increased musicianship with the ukulele?
    Kamaka Pineapple Soprano (koa)
    Joaquin Custom Soprano (mango)
    Lone Tree Custom Soprano (hemlock, western maple, pacific yew)
    Lone Tree Custom Tenor (driftwood red cedar, black cherry, western maple)

  2. #2
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    Any of the 'Fake Books', most are written for instruments in C, but sometimes require a low G to play the melody.
    https://www.halleonard.com/search/se...esfeature=FKBK

    Online, check out flute tunes, again written for a C instrument. - https://www.flutetunes.com/
    & also this site - https://www.8notes.com/flute/
    Trying to do justice to various musical instruments.

  3. #3
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    Jack Campin's "Nine Note Tunebook" can be a good place to start http://www.campin.me.uk/Music/Chalumeau.abc though it does miss out the low G string, but you've got to start somewhere. The link goes to an ABC listing, which can be converted to a PDF in standard notation using on-line converters or a local program.

    And before we get into another "don't want/need to learn another notation" thread, ABC is just programming code, with a very low download overhead, which can be used to generate conventional notation sheet music and MIDI files, so you can read the tune and have something to play along with

    Enjoy
    There are those who will wax lyrical about the ability to play a double shuffle with a split fan and a tight G-string ...
    it just makes me walk funny!

  4. #4
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    How do you feel about Irish Traditional Music?

    https://thesession.org/

    Most of the tunes are in the key of D major(2 sharps) or G major(one sharp).
    Playing my Magic Fluke and grinning like a fool!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
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    Quote Originally Posted by fretie View Post
    I am on a hunt for fairly easy sheet music with standard notation so that I can practice sight reading music as a way of applying my newly acquired knowledge of scales on the low G uke.

    Broadly speaking, I can read music, however, specifically with the uke I have not been playing notes on the scale. I have been strumming chords and reading tab. But now I would like to actually read standard notation and get some practice with playing specific notes up and down the fretboard.

    Can you suggest some resources to help me move towards my goal of increased musicianship with the ukulele?
    When I was doing what you're doing, I didn't use particular resources, but rather used certain strategies:

    1. I started by playing the chromatic scale starting with open G string, going to the G on the 10th fret of the A string, and from there sliding up the A string until I hit the E on the 19th fret. I would say the notes as I played them. I played them as sharps as I went up the fretboard and flats as I came back down. And I looked at my hands as I played them. In that way I was learning my notes by touch, by sight, and by mouth.

    2. I would take a key and play it in all its modes, starting from both the G string and the C string. This is similar to the previous exercise, except that you only using 7 notes over and over again in different orders.

    3. Finally, just pick a song arranged for any instrument (the true beauty of reading music) and start practicing it. The two songs I began with were Bach's "Jesu joy of man's desiring" and Cole Porter's "My heart belongs to daddy." This is the important step because you learn by doing. The one thing you will need to do as a ukulele player is transpose. The ukulele only has a little more than two octaves in its range. You don't always need to do this, but when you do here is what I would do: find the lowest note of the piece you're reading and then transpose to a key where that note is the open G string. By doing this you give yourself as much room as possible on the fretboard.

  6. #6
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    I practice from Jim Beloff’s yellow and blue Daily Ukulele.

  7. #7
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    I recently started and first source was the local library. Most songbooks are standard sheet music with just a line of melody and the corresponding chords. I am also on the James Hill Ukelele Way site. He has a number of free lessons and his songsheets are presented in this manner.

  8. #8
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    Wow, lots of good ideas here! Thank you so much.
    Kamaka Pineapple Soprano (koa)
    Joaquin Custom Soprano (mango)
    Lone Tree Custom Soprano (hemlock, western maple, pacific yew)
    Lone Tree Custom Tenor (driftwood red cedar, black cherry, western maple)

  9. #9
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    May 2015
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    Wiltshire, UK
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    I just came across this article from Ukulele magazine which has both standard and tab notation.
    Seems like a great exercise too.
    http://www.ukulelemag.com/uketube/le...ter-uke-player

  10. #10
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    Oct 2018
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    Having just come to the ukulele as an adult but having played lots of sheet music as a child I would suggest learning the way the kids do. Get a kids music learning book for ukulele or flute or any wind instrument and just play through the book from absolute beginner to exam level. Most Kids never practice, except at their lessons which Must drive the teachers nuts, so they are always sight reading and they simply pick up skills by progressing from one tune to the next without the need we adults have to get it right first.

    It’s a different skill, it still surprises me now that I can’t sight read a song tab for strumming chords but i used to be ale to pick up my flute and sight read a fairly complex melody.
    Last edited by Davoravo; 10-13-2018 at 09:26 AM.

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