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Thread: Parallel builds

  1. #21
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    Aug 2018
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    The hard way to trim a sound hole port. I started by using my trim router and a set of acrylic templates to cut an oval ring from Black Walnut. Then I stuck self-adhesive 80 grit paper to the upper bout of the baritone uke and started sanding one side of the ring until it fit the contour of the uke. Then I held it against the side and traced the outline. The oval kept wanting to slide while I traced, so I had to erase and re-trace several times until I got it right. Then I used a Dremel with a tiny inlay bit to slowly cut through the side and thin ply backing, going very slowly so I wouldn't splinter the backing. Finally, I used a sanding drum in the Dremel to work away at the waste until the ring slid in place. It is hard to get a perfect fit and I had to do some gap filling, but after shaping and sanding the excess Walnut, the finished ring looked good when I wiped everything down with grain alcohol. A lot of work over the past 2 days, but I like the results.

    P1010994.jpgP1010995.jpgP1010996.jpgP1011000.jpgP1011001.jpg

  2. #22
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    Aug 2018
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    After sanding until my arm about fell off:

    P1011002.jpg

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
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    Tampa Bay, FL
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    I love the sound port trim. I bet it was worth all the effort.
    "Those who bring sunshine and laughter to the lives of others cannot keep it from themselves".

    Music washes from the soul, the dust of everyday living.

  4. #24
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    Dec 2010
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    Tampa Bay, FL
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    Quote Originally Posted by sequoia View Post
    Sorry to hear about the tenor uke. Must have been painful. The tenor guitar is an interesting looking instrument and it looks like it turned out well... You are going to love working with California Bay Laurel (or as some call it; Oregon myrtle). Works well and can have beautiful grain and figure. Keep us in the loop as building progresses. Below California Bay Laurel uke I built awhile ago:

    Attachment 121692
    That looks really nice...
    "Those who bring sunshine and laughter to the lives of others cannot keep it from themselves".

    Music washes from the soul, the dust of everyday living.

  5. #25
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    Aug 2018
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nickie View Post
    I love the sound port trim. I bet it was worth all the effort.
    Thanks Nickie, it was. I'm going to start on the same process for the tenor uke today, this time using a small chunk of Indian Rosewood left over from a guitar bridge. I expect that will be a lot harder to sand.

  6. #26
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    Aug 2018
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    More woodcraft fun. Some great progress lately on my tenor and baritone ukuleles. The tenor uke has the same side sound port with Black Walnut trim ring as on the baritone. Just glued on the tenor's top and trimmed it flush this afternoon. Almost ready for the top bindings and neck attachment.

    P1011009.jpgP1011010.jpg

  7. #27
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    Aug 2018
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    Some nice progress over the past few days. Installed the Rosewood bindings on the tenor, fitted and trimmed most of the braces on the baritone soundboard, and installed the kerfed linings on the top side of the baritone body. Next is carving and fitting the tenor neck that is sitting next to the body. The tenor will likely be finished well before the baritone; it's much less complicated than the baritone. I'm still puzzling over how to cleanly cut binding channels on the baritone, which has an arched top and back.

    P1011011.jpg
    Last edited by tonyturley; 11-23-2019 at 09:46 AM.

  8. #28
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    Aug 2018
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    Happy Thanksgiving, all. Here's my stopping point for now. The top on the baritone has been flush cut, and I'm working on test fitting the rough cut tenor neck. I am going to wait until next week to begin working on the baritone bindings - those are going to be tricky due to the tapered sides and arched top and back.

    DSCF0035.jpg

  9. #29
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    Aug 2018
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    Iíve made a lot of progress on my twin ukulele projects this week. Both necks are shaped and sanded, ready for the headstock plates and inlays. I still need to install the body bindings on the baritone, and the frets on the tenor. I had been scratching my head on the best way to attach the baritone neck, and I came up with a jig for holding the neck firmly while cutting a spline slot, while keeping my fingers well away from the router bit.

    I hope to have both instruments assembled and ready to begin applying the finish by the first of the year.

    DSCF0038.jpgDSCF0040.jpgDSCF0039.jpg

  10. #30
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    Aug 2018
    Location
    Australia.
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    You do very neat work, Tony. They are two nice looking instruments in the making.
    Your pocket jig is a work of art.
    One thing that I noticed in image 0040, is that the grain in your removable tongue appears not to be coplanar to the neck wood grain. If it was just popped in that way for the photo, ignore this pedantic observation … just trying to be helpful, not critical.

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