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Thread: Best ukulele absolute beginners book assuming no music knowledge and is for morons?

  1. #1
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    Default Best ukulele absolute beginners book assuming no music knowledge and is for morons?

    Which is the best ukulele absolute beginners book assuming no music knowledge and is for morons? Furthermore, it should be entirely a tuition book, not the sort that has a quarter of its content covering the history of the ukulele and the stories of famous players.

    I could use such a book.
    Last edited by _Ukeless_; 11-05-2018 at 04:26 PM.
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  2. #2
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    I'm not sure if you have a particular type of music you're interested in, but this might be one book to look at:
    Jake Shimabukuro Teaches Ukukele Lessons. IIRC, it also comes with access to videos of Jake teaching the material.

    Glad to see that you're no longer ukeless, even though you don't have your name changed yet.

  3. #3
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    I am into
    'modern folk' i.e written in the last 50 years such as https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nF7JWfx0rjE
    some ballads such as https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G-ZDKirjQgM
    light rock such as https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t-8K8Hj8bxE
    Neil Diamond, especially https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p2jqesfWbKc
    anything done by Don McLean before he began spending half his on-stage time grumbling about being badly treated by record companies
    this lot are awesome, they could fart in harmony https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xBweqmLk6dU
    Ukulele Orchestra Of Great Britain Fan & Carlisle United Fan

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  4. #4

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    Honestly - youtube and then a subscription to the lessons offered here at UU.

    You’re gonna be able to find tons of useful books around. But the thing that’s going to help you get over the initial jump of learning basic chord changes will be strumming along with people.

  5. #5
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    Are you planning to play the uke and sing? This may sound odd, but for someone starting out with no musical background, learn to play a C chord. It is the second easiest chord to play because you only need to press one note on one string (1st string 3rd fret). Move your right hand and play all 4 strings. If that chord is one you can easily sing to, there are about a half a dozen chords in the key of C that are easy to learn (F, G, Em, Am & Dm). If you learn C, F and G chords you can play thousands of 3 chord folk, blues, rock songs.

    I only suggest this because playing a ukulele is fun and for some people trying to work through a book isn't. I always show people a C chord and most are amazed that it is easy to play something musical.

    As others have suggested youtube is great for basics because you can see how to form a chord or strum and not just have pictures or diagrams. Once you learn a little you can decide where to go from there.

    John
    Last edited by 70sSanO; 11-05-2018 at 07:54 PM.

  6. #6
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    I have several books, and they’re by well respected people, but I don’t recall any of them being the one that made a vast difference - what did is noted later. At the moment I can’t put my hand on them to see what I used ‘cause some are lent out and others are submerged under the clutter of life. As I recall the Sproat books were some support to me, he’s a professional U.K. based player and teacher.

    Try out your local library and ask the librarian to search his/her catalogue for you, IIRC there are alternate ways to spell Ukuelele/Ukelele so valid results don’t always come up. I got a couple of books from my local library, neither were brilliant and I could play a little already but they did provide some useful information.

    Find and visit Uke clubs near to you, typically they help beginners. <— best recommendation.

    Look and see if there are night classes on learning the Uke that aren’t too far from you, they have been a great help to me but my instructor is both a very good player and good at teaching too. Before taking classes I had some books and a dusty Uke - things weren’t going well - but after a term with him (to get the basics in place) I went off to a Uke Club and grew there.

    As you have some Ukes now don’t forget the importance of setting them up - there are lots of threads on that topic and how to do so already.

    Good luck.
    Last edited by Graham Greenbag; 11-05-2018 at 11:20 PM.

  7. #7
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    Ukulele for Dummies

    Looking for one book for someone who has no prior musical knowledge, I'd suggest this is the one to get.
    Trying to do justice to various musical instruments.

  8. #8
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    I have at least a dozen instructional books, but playing with a group and watching online instruction are what taught me how to play. For someone just starting out, I think any basic instructional book will be as good as any other. As for the extras - history, players, types of ukes - if you don't want that, don't read it.

    This one is good.
    https://smile.amazon.com/Ukulele-Aer...ulele+aerobics
    Too many ukes, but I can't stop buying!

  9. #9
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    If you have access to the internet I’d suggest sampling books from amazon or iTunes or google. This would give you an idea of the books content. I know that there are some older, in the public domain, method books that might be helpful.

    ‘A practical method’ by Bailey using gCEA tuning,
    Kamiki Ukulele method using ADF#B tuning.

    Both these books are available here.
    http://www.freemusiced.org/free-instrument-books.html
    Last edited by Lacole; 11-07-2018 at 08:06 AM.
    LACole

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  10. #10
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    Try your local library, too. If they have a book you like, order it online from Amazon or someplace else. Our library has a couple of dozen instructional and music books for the uke.
    Too many ukes, but I can't stop buying!

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