Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 24

Thread: How many strings should I get?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Steveston, B.C. Canada
    Posts
    837

    Default How many strings should I get?

    ...on my next custom uke?
    I want get a custom tenor built with a shimmer to its sound. I could get an 8 string, that would shimmer for sure. Weve been trying to actually order an 8 string from an Ohana dealer up here in the northland but that hasnt been moving along quickly...fodder for another thread.

    So, if I go custom, I can get any number of strings: five, six, eight. Id like to hear your points of view on this choice. What would you get and why or not get and why not?

    ,
    Kamaka Pineapple Soprano (koa)
    Joaquin Custom Soprano (mango)
    Lone Tree Custom Soprano (hemlock, western maple, pacific yew)
    Lone Tree Custom Tenor (driftwood red cedar, black cherry, western maple)

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Ames, Iowa/San Juan, Puerto Rico
    Posts
    3,346

    Default

    I think that it is totally up to you. Everyone has their own opinion, and mine is that four strings are enough, but you aren't buying it for me. So whatever talks to you, just do it.
    I don't want to live in a world that is linear.

    https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_n...tective+Agency

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Posts
    213

    Default

    It's not only the number of strings but also if you have some or all in unison or some or all in octaves. There are so many options that the only way to find out what works for you is to go to stores and try them all out. Traditional 8 string tenor or taropatch concert can both be great supplements if you already have 4 strings in all sizes.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    375

    Default

    I have a 5 string with a Low & High G. I can play the strings individually, or together depending on what sound I would like to get.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Cleveland Ohio
    Posts
    18

    Default

    I have 2 nearly identical Oscar-Schmidt's, one a 4 string and one a taropatch 8 string.
    The shimmer is strong on the taropatch!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    1,182

    Default

    If more strings add more shimmer than you must need a tiple

    Do you have the chance to play some, so you can hear and feel the instrument and determine what works for you?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    New Hampshire, USA
    Posts
    353

    Default

    I have a Tiple, but I have it strung with 8 strings rather than 10. I use a high and low G and the rest in pairs. It allows me to play music that is arranged in high or low G and there is a nice full sound. My old tiple has a fairly thin top and fan bracing, so I put a set of Worth Browns on it and it sounds quite good.
    Current Herd:

    Sopranos:
    Recent Martins: 3 Centennial, 5K, 3 Cherry and OXK
    Vintage Martin: 1950s #1
    Kiwaya KTS-7
    Laughlin 3K, (1920 Martin 3K Bow Tie and Kite copy, 1 of 2) and Mahogany 3

    Concert:
    Magic Fluke Flea

    Tenor:
    Kiwaya KMT-K, strung with Aquila Reds, sweet as can be
    Pono Master Series Tenor, Cedar/Mahogany
    Romero Creations Replica, Mahogany

    Tiple:
    Yasuma (Martin T28 copy, Rosewood with Spruce top)

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Steveston, B.C. Canada
    Posts
    837

    Default

    Gentlemen, your input is much appreciated!

    Of course, if I could try out various double string combinations, I would feel like I was the bees knees. But that is not an option around here. Lucky I am a risk taker.

    At the moment I am leaning towards a 6 string tenor: G, aA, e, cC or perhaps g, aA, e, cC
    Kamaka Pineapple Soprano (koa)
    Joaquin Custom Soprano (mango)
    Lone Tree Custom Soprano (hemlock, western maple, pacific yew)
    Lone Tree Custom Tenor (driftwood red cedar, black cherry, western maple)

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    New Hampshire, USA
    Posts
    353

    Default

    Could do a 5 string with high and low G. I play mostly fingerstyle, so the high and low G is very versatile, (in my case I do have pairs on the others as well, but not octave). It really depends on your playing style and what you want out of the instrument. You might do well to just go on YouTube and seek out people playing with different string combinations.
    Last edited by Django; 12-30-2018 at 04:53 PM.
    Current Herd:

    Sopranos:
    Recent Martins: 3 Centennial, 5K, 3 Cherry and OXK
    Vintage Martin: 1950s #1
    Kiwaya KTS-7
    Laughlin 3K, (1920 Martin 3K Bow Tie and Kite copy, 1 of 2) and Mahogany 3

    Concert:
    Magic Fluke Flea

    Tenor:
    Kiwaya KMT-K, strung with Aquila Reds, sweet as can be
    Pono Master Series Tenor, Cedar/Mahogany
    Romero Creations Replica, Mahogany

    Tiple:
    Yasuma (Martin T28 copy, Rosewood with Spruce top)

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    JoCo, NC (near Raleigh)
    Posts
    3,927

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by fretie View Post
    At the moment I am leaning towards a 6 string tenor: G, aA, e, cC or perhaps g, aA, e, cC
    Sounds like a good choice, and you don't have to go custom to see if you like it:
    https://www.mimsukes.com/listing/mim...emish/10650036
    Ukelele:
    Iriguchi Tenor "Weeble" - Bb, SC SMU
    Blue Star 19" baritone Konablaster - DGBE
    KPK pineapple SLN-GCEA
    Cocobolo 16" SC#1-gCEA, SC SLMU
    Ono #42 19" baritone, Ab, LW
    Imua iET-Bb, M600
    Covered Bridge CLN pineapple - Eb cuatro, SC XLL
    Rogue bari
    Bonanza super tenor, cFAD SC LHU
    Kala KSLNG-C Lava
    Guitars:
    Cordoba C1m 1/4, TI CF127, G
    Cordoba Mini M, SC F# EFS
    Jupiter #47, TI CF127, G

    Jim's Blog

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •