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Thread: Neck attachment method?

  1. #11

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    I think the other question I would suggest you ask yourself is how many Ukes do you want to make?

    I started with the Spanish heel and I liked it but it left me thinking I wanted to try a bolt on method....second I did a butt join with bolt on (and glue) & it was a bit of a pain & left something to be desired. At this point I knew I was hooked and wanted to keep building ukes & I like finishing the neck & body separate...So then I went through the process & built a Mortise & Tenon Jig (like Kekani mentioned) I REALLY like this way of doing things! Well worth the time IF you plan to make enough to warrant the time etc.....Or if you can afford to by the pre-made version (but I tend to like building my tools & jigs).

    In the end they all work well & they all have their pros and cons....you just need to figure out what you like & how much time & $ you want to invest. So I suggest trying more than one if you want to build many OR go with the one that seems simplest with your skill level / tools available if this is a one or two type situation.

  2. #12

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    Some of the bigger uke makers use a bisquet joint. Just one bisquet and your good to go.
    Michael Smith
    Goat Rock Ukulele
    www.goatrockukulele.com

  3. #13

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    Thank you all for your input

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Tours - France
    Posts
    334

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    On my 29 past ukuleles.
    Soprano to tenor.
    No problem at all.

    Keep in mind that take off ( if necessairy ) the neck isn't so easy that mortise assembly ... near impossible ...

    Attachment 114486

    Attachment 114487
    Last edited by gerardg; 01-04-2019 at 07:46 AM.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Greenville, VA.
    Posts
    725

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    I like to make parts in batches of however many I feel like. So I fit necks like this. Its not new on UU but I haven't seen it lately. I hope they make sense without captions. Individual fitting is seldom necessary.

    DSC_0031.jpg

    DSC_0033.jpg

    neck_fit3.jpg

    DSC_0038.jpg

    DSC_0024 (2).jpg

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by jcalkin View Post
    I like to make parts in batches of however many I feel like. So I fit necks like this. Its not new on UU but I haven't seen it lately. I hope they make sense without captions. Individual fitting is seldom necessary.

    DSC_0031.jpg

    DSC_0033.jpg

    neck_fit3.jpg

    DSC_0038.jpg

    DSC_0024 (2).jpg
    Hey, thank you very much this looks like the way I might do my first neck.

    I wrote a description just to see if I understood the photographs correctly.

    Photo 1
    Is just basically the jig you use to drill the bolt hole that attaches the neck to the body

    Photo 2
    This is a photo of you using the jig. The top bit is holding the jig in place.

    Photo 3
    These are the jigs you use to radius the neck to the body. I’m assuming you do this with the Robo Sander.

    Photo 4
    This is a photo of the neck clamped to the jig before it’s radiused with the Robo sander

    Photo 5
    This is a photo of the necks radiused with the bolts attached.

    Thanks

  7. #17
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Greenville, VA.
    Posts
    725

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Steve-atl View Post
    Hey, thank you very much this looks like the way I might do my first neck.

    I wrote a description just to see if I understood the photographs correctly.

    Photo 1
    Is just basically the jig you use to drill the bolt hole that attaches the neck to the body

    Photo 2
    This is a photo of you using the jig. The top bit is holding the jig in place.

    Photo 3
    These are the jigs you use to radius the neck to the body. I’m assuming you do this with the Robo Sander.

    Photo 4
    This is a photo of the neck clamped to the jig before it’s radiused with the Robo sander

    Photo 5
    This is a photo of the necks radiused with the bolts attached.

    Thanks

    About #2: There are centerlines on the neck and heel, as well as all contacting surfaces of the jig. In use a cam clamp is applied to the rear of the jig and neck, and the larger bit is removed to drill the hole for the connector bolt.

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