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Thread: scarf joint sled trubles

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by DPO View Post
    The table saw has almost nothing to do with it strangely enough. It's all about how the wood moves past the blade, and that comes down to the sled. And the secret to a good sled is the runner and how it fits in the slot, there can be absolutely NO slop or sideways movement
    or the angle will be wrong. I cut sixteen blocks per ring, more on a feature ring and they fit together with no sanding.
    That's impressive, Dennis, I must say.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by jcalkin View Post
    That's impressive, Dennis, I must say.
    I wasted a lot of time and wood with sleds that simply did not work correctly. Then I stumbled upon segmented wood turning and these guys do amazing work with very complex designs using a very simple home made sled. Google ' wedgie sled' if you are interested in the subect. pretty fascinating stuff.
    Kind Regards
    Dennis

    dpophotography@yahoo.co.nz
    Southern Cross Banjo Ukes & Ukuleles
    Proudly Hand Crafted in
    New Zealand.

  3. #13
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    May 2015
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    Could it be using a $100 blade rather than a $20?

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by printer2 View Post
    Could it be using a $100 blade rather than a $20?
    Well the finer toothed blade the better imho, however the real cause is almost always the sled, if you are pushing wood past a spinning blade there can be NO unwanted movement in the sled. 90% of the problems are because there is sideways movement between the runner and the table saw slot. Eliminate that and you eliminate most, if not all, of the issues.
    Kind Regards
    Dennis

    dpophotography@yahoo.co.nz
    Southern Cross Banjo Ukes & Ukuleles
    Proudly Hand Crafted in
    New Zealand.

  5. #15

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    I have rebuilt the sled with a new design. It is a lot beefier. Right now I am using the fence of the table saw. We Will see if that's better

    Thanks

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by DPO View Post
    Well the finer toothed blade the better imho, however the real cause is almost always the sled, if you are pushing wood past a spinning blade there can be NO unwanted movement in the sled. 90% of the problems are because there is sideways movement between the runner and the table saw slot. Eliminate that and you eliminate most, if not all, of the issues.
    When I used the table for scarfs, I went from a sled to an attachment on my Incra Miter fence; no slop, but because I use blade stiffener, I couldn't go through the whole cut, and the joint still needed some planing on the cutoff section.

    In reference to blade teeth, I went through a lot of BB ply at one point and found a CMT combo blade worked well, even for the scarf. When I held my Workshop at the UGH, part of the discussion for scarfs was the use of a ripping, or crosscut because of the angle of cut. There was no consensus other that "use what works". My crosscut in the sliding miter saw works the best for me, and fully cuts the joint. I think it's either 60 or 80, but my combo was 40.

    Edited: autocorrect threw in some funky wording.
    Last edited by Kekani; 01-12-2019 at 12:01 AM.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kekani View Post
    When I used the table for scarfs, I went from a sled to an attachment on my Incra Miter fence; no slop, but because I use blade stiffener, I couldn't go through the whole cut, and the joint still needed some planning on the cutoff section.

    In reference to blade teeth, I went through a lot of BB ply at one point and found a CMT combo blade worked well, even for the scarf. When I had my workshop at the UGH, part of the discussion for scarfs was the use of a tipping, or crosscut because of the angle of cut. There was no consensus other that "use what works". My crosscut in the sliding miter saw works the best for me, and fully cuts the joint. I think it's either 60 or 80, but my combo was 40.
    Yes the Incra works well because the runner has adjustment points to take out the slop. Homemade sleds don't tend to, but a simple workaround is to cut a 1 inch slot either ends of the wooden runner and screw a woodscrew part way in to adjust out any play.
    Kind Regards
    Dennis

    dpophotography@yahoo.co.nz
    Southern Cross Banjo Ukes & Ukuleles
    Proudly Hand Crafted in
    New Zealand.

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by DPO View Post
    a simple workaround is to cut a 1 inch slot either ends of the wooden runner and screw a woodscrew part way in to adjust out any play.
    Sorry, but are you saying when you screw a woodscrew part way in it spreads the wood and takes out the slop?

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve-atl View Post
    Sorry, but are you saying when you screw a woodscrew part way in it spreads the wood and takes out the slop?
    Correct, take out the slop/play at each end of the runner and you are heading for accurate cuts.
    Kind Regards
    Dennis

    dpophotography@yahoo.co.nz
    Southern Cross Banjo Ukes & Ukuleles
    Proudly Hand Crafted in
    New Zealand.

  10. #20
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    Oct 2012
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    I use my sliding compound mitre saw. Straight out of the box it has positive lock engagement at 15 22.5 30 and 45. The only jig reqirement was a block of wood for length. I used the glue for two halves and flat sand method when it is in two halves it can easily be rough cut on the bandsaw which would make turning easier though I just sanded smooth using a flap wheel on the inside and a grinder on the outside. I only ever did 8 segment and my cheap Ozito is hardly a precision machine and I only made half a dozen or so.
    Going back on topic to the 15 degree scarf join, I had to make a jig to get the mitre saw to do 15 (75 relative to vertical) but replaced that with a sled on the bandsaw. I still have to tidy up the ends but the cutting feels more in control the compound mitre saw does not get much use otherwise and the loose end has been known to get catapulted or chewed by the spinning blade which I largely solved by holding it in the jig with masking tape. I much prefer the bandsaw sled and the bandsaw in general.
    Last edited by Titchtheclown; 01-11-2019 at 11:45 PM. Reason: Checked actual angles on the machine
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