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Thread: scarf joint sled trubles

  1. #1

    Default scarf joint sled trubles

    Iíve made a scarf joint sled for my tablesaw. I checked and double checked to make sure that the sled fence and the blade are parallel and the sled and blade or perpendicular to the top of the saw. So why isnít my line not straight. See photo

    I used a 40 tooth combination blade to cut it. could it be from deflection of the blade

    The red line is the edge of the scarf joint

    Thanks
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2
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    You got good answers from the OLF already, but your setup has your stock twisting, my guess. Your blade looks good.

    Personally, I moved to a sliding miter the other year. At a UGH workshop I taught, oddly, this was THE most asked about and photographed jig.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve-atl View Post
    I’ve made a scarf joint sled for my tablesaw. I checked and double checked to make sure that the sled fence and the blade are parallel and the sled and blade or perpendicular to the top of the saw. So why isn’t my line not straight. See photo

    I used a 40 tooth combination blade to cut it. could it be from deflection of the blade

    The red line is the edge of the scarf joint

    Thanks
    Forty tooth blade is for rough cuts, you need an eighty tooth blade for fine work.
    Kind Regards
    Dennis

    dpophotography@yahoo.co.nz
    Southern Cross Banjo Ukes & Ukuleles
    Proudly Hand Crafted in
    New Zealand.

  4. #4
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    Perhaps from growing up with crappy table saws, as well as the way wood can move around after cutting, I don't depend on them to cut anything perfectly square (though it sure would be nice). Even on quality saws, I've noticed that the stock fence can bow sometimes after tightening. Nevertheless, I glue up the scarf joints as they come off the saw, 40-tooth blades and all. I've gotten to be an ace at squaring everything up on the belt sander, and it's faster than fiddling forever with the table saw. I've known a bunch of luthiers, and none of them have used table saws except for rough work. Scarfing and glueing a dozen necks is quick fun, then they sit around patiently while I use up the previous batch. I give them plenty of time to get squirrelly if they are so inclined, though uke necks are so short that it's not really a problem.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by jcalkin View Post
    Perhaps from growing up with crappy table saws, as well as the way wood can move around after cutting, I don't depend on them to cut anything perfectly square (though it sure would be nice). Even on quality saws, I've noticed that the stock fence can bow sometimes after tightening. Nevertheless, I glue up the scarf joints as they come off the saw, 40-tooth blades and all. I've gotten to be an ace at squaring everything up on the belt sander, and it's faster than fiddling forever with the table saw. I've known a bunch of luthiers, and none of them have used table saws except for rough work. Scarfing and glueing a dozen necks is quick fun, then they sit around patiently while I use up the previous batch. I give them plenty of time to get squirrelly if they are so inclined, though uke necks are so short that it's not really a problem.
    None have used a table saw except for rough work? Seriously!!
    Well I make banjo ukes utilising solid block construction bodies made up of a minimum of 48 small segments cut at very precise angles, all done on the table saw. Google segmented woodturning and find out what a craftsman can do on a table saw. Rough work LOL!!!
    Kind Regards
    Dennis

    dpophotography@yahoo.co.nz
    Southern Cross Banjo Ukes & Ukuleles
    Proudly Hand Crafted in
    New Zealand.

  6. #6
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    Done on the table saw.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Kind Regards
    Dennis

    dpophotography@yahoo.co.nz
    Southern Cross Banjo Ukes & Ukuleles
    Proudly Hand Crafted in
    New Zealand.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by DPO View Post
    Done on the table saw.
    That for posting

    Now I want to make one, That's awesome

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kekani View Post
    You got good answers from the OLF already, but your setup has your stock twisting, my guess. Your blade looks good.

    Personally, I moved to a sliding miter the other year. At a UGH workshop I taught, oddly, this was THE most asked about and photographed jig.
    I saw your post and got my miter saw out. Did you build a jig? My saw will not turn enough to cut a 12ļ scarf joint using the fence. Will you post a photo of the jig?

    Thanks

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by DPO View Post
    Done on the table saw.
    I make segmented banjo rims, too. They are fast to make, but the last piece never quite fits. Its not a big deal, as it can be quickly altered on a disk sander to fit. Or the 8 piece layers can be made 4 and 4, then the halves custom fit. Friends of mine made their table saw jigs on a CNC and the eight pieces never quite fit together perfectly for them, either. But, honestly, rims are so easy to make that I'm not inclined to tweak the table saw anymore. I'll try to post some photos later. Your rims look nice. I'm glad the table saw has worked out so well for you.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by jcalkin View Post
    I make segmented banjo rims, too. They are fast to make, but the last piece never quite fits. Its not a big deal, as it can be quickly altered on a disk sander to fit. Or the 8 piece layers can be made 4 and 4, then the halves custom fit. Friends of mine made their table saw jigs on a CNC and the eight pieces never quite fit together perfectly for them, either. But, honestly, rims are so easy to make that I'm not inclined to tweak the table saw anymore. I'll try to post some photos later. Your rims look nice. I'm glad the table saw has worked out so well for you.
    The table saw has almost nothing to do with it strangely enough. It's all about how the wood moves past the blade, and that comes down to the sled. And the secret to a good sled is the runner and how it fits in the slot, there can be absolutely NO slop or sideways movement
    or the angle will be wrong. I cut sixteen blocks per ring, more on a feature ring and they fit together with no sanding.
    Kind Regards
    Dennis

    dpophotography@yahoo.co.nz
    Southern Cross Banjo Ukes & Ukuleles
    Proudly Hand Crafted in
    New Zealand.

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