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Thread: Ukulele for the automobile

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
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    U.K.
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    Quote Originally Posted by hendulele View Post
    For Michigan winters, I'd recommend the Outdoor uke. Temps below zero (Fahrenheit) can be common and summers are downright hot and swampy. Even a laminate standard uke would have trouble surviving the extremes.
    I’d have thought a Soprano Outdoor Uke was the logical way forward. Buying a first act ($20?) as a stop gap probably isn’t money particularly well spent - ‘he who buys cheap buys twice’, etc. - so if the OP can defer her purchase and save towards an OU then that would make sense to me. My own route would be to just use my cheap 2nd hand plastic bodied Dolphin until it broke, I’ve yet to hear of one breaking easily or in cold weather, YMMV.

    I’m kind of puzzled by the idea that a laminate Uke couldn’t stand up to the Michigan climate ‘cause judging by the number of Uke Clubs that I easily find there there must be a lot of Uke players in Michigan: http://www.motorcityukes.com/michigan-ukulele-groups . Wonder what they played before the Outdoor Uke was made, to me something doesn’t seem quite clear here.

    I guess it’s just some form of misunderstanding about wood not being durable in cold weather, you really don’t have to look far to see all types of wooden items being used in very tough conditions and lasting many decades. As with all things subtle details make the difference.
    Last edited by Graham Greenbag; 01-24-2019 at 11:09 PM.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
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    West Midlands GB
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    As a resident of the British Isles I cannot add much to this debate. We simple do not experience great extremes of heat, cold or humidity. For many years I kept a cheap painted Mahalo soprano in my car. I would guess that the lowest temperature it endured was just below freezing, but the highest, in a car, parked in direct summer sunshine, with all windows closed, would have been lethal to most life forms - as we know them, Jim.

    The uke itself survived (I still have it) but the high temperatures were enough to ruin the strings. They became so soft and stretchy that they were useless.

    I now have a very cheap Chinese soprano (made of HPL) in the car. It is a better uke all round than the old Mahalo, and looks very much better.

    John Colter.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Raleigh, NC
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    1,768

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    Quote Originally Posted by Graham Greenbag View Post

    I’m kind of puzzled by the idea that a laminate Uke couldn’t stand up to the Michigan climate ‘cause judging by the number of Uke Clubs that I easily find there there must be a lot of Uke players in Michigan: http://www.motorcityukes.com/michigan-ukulele-groups . Wonder what they played before the Outdoor Uke was made, to me something doesn’t seem quite clear here.

    I guess it’s just some form of misunderstanding about wood not being durable in cold weather, you really don’t have to look far to see all types of wooden items being used in very tough conditions and lasting many decades. As with all things subtle details make the difference.

    I think the problem with leaving a laminate uke in the car during extreme temps (both cold and heat, as you get in Michigan) and not removing it is that things like fretboards and bridges which are made of different materials than the body and glued on could be compromised. Even the folks at Magic Fluke recommend keeping their instruments with solid wood tops and wooden fretboards away from forced-air heating registers. The Outdoor solves this problem because, except for the tuners and strings, it's all molded plastic.
    Martin C1K • Famous by Kiwaya FS-1 <yippee!!> • Ohana CK-50WG concert (solid cedar top) • Ohana SK-35G solid mahogany soprano <yay!!> • Firefly maple concert banjolele <yee-haw!> • Flea koa soprano • Lanikai LU22CFM laminate flame maple concert • Islander MAT-4 spalted maple tenor • Makala MK-CE concert • Woodrow "Steelers" soprano <eyeroll>

    Raleigh Uke Jam:

    My YouTube page

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    U.K.
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    An Outdoor Uke it is should be then, keeps things simple and risk free. If it’s any help to the OP then a 2nd hand Soprano OU sold on eBay recently for $60 delivered (a bargain), it was only a few months old and fault free.

    John’s suggestion of a cheap HPL Uke (Formica type material, perhaps Enya Brand, 2nd hand) seems OK to me here and in general. However, bar a very cheap second hand Enya, I think that I’d stick with the Outdoor Uke - keeps things simple and the quality is both well known and liked. Decisions, decisions, having checked on Enya I’m now aware of their Pineapple and it tempts me, there’s a standard Soprano too ( https://www.amazon.com/EUP-X1-Pineap.../dp/B07488S4SR , https://www.amazon.com/Official-EUS-.../dp/B0749JBYD1 ) - I think that the alternative circle type body is not as good. Anyway I already have too many Ukuleles, or so I’m told.

    I suppose it’s a case of the OP seeing what’s available, what might work and what is within their budget.
    Last edited by Graham Greenbag; 01-26-2019 at 05:48 AM.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Location
    Owen Sound, Ontario, Canada
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    Do you have a cell phone?

    Crazy idea try a phone app, always with you and no one would suspect you are carrying an ‘uke’.
    LACole
    Laurie Ann Cole

    Northern UK20 Concert Mahogany
    Beaver Creek BCUKEFM-T Tenor Maple Flame
    Eddy Finn EF-Moon Concert Mahogany
    Beaver Creek BCUKE-S Soprano Mahogany

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    West Los Angeles, California
    Posts
    365

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    You might call up KLOS Guitars. And ask if they have any "seconds" (blemished finish) of their carbon Fibre ukes with neck stiffener. I love my KLOS. I would have no worries leaving it in a hot car or snow covered car.
    * * * * * * * * *
    My pride and joy is a Solid Mahogany Tiny Tenor from Pepe Romero/Daniel Ho. I named it "Lumičre"
    I also have a Kala Soprano KA-ASOV-S Spruce and Ovangkol which I named "Blood, Sweat, & Tears"
    And another soprano by Kanilea. The Islander AS-4 Acacia that I call "Little Bear"
    KLOS Carbon Fiber Tenor Deluxe Acoustic/Electric Ukulele - no name yet

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