Page 3 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 42

Thread: Do You Use a Tablet, Rather than Books?

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    on a sunny FL beach
    Posts
    1,254

    Default

    I use a regular ipad with onsong. I don’t feel that it really needs to be bigger as you can adjust the font to pretty large for most songs and still keep it to one page; more than that and you can set a scroll. The large ipad pro is exponentially more expensive and doesn’t seem necessary, even for my old eyes. The only time I really wish I had it would be for the e-versions of the daily ukulele books, which have a small light font that can be difficult to read even in the standard full sized paper version.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Irvine and San Jose, CA
    Posts
    577

    Default

    No one has mentioned the use of a page turner. This is what I use:

    iPad
    ForScore
    PageFlip

    This combination works well for me, easy to upload PDF's into my iPad, easy to use software, and simple to use foot pedal. And I am not tech savvy.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Petaluma, CA
    Posts
    589

    Default

    I've been using a Nook+v8 for several years after accumulating a stack of song sheets about 3 feet high + a full drop file in my desk. I didn't count the published song books. I now upload directly PDF songs in 15 files with still memory to spare for more.
    Some song sheets have too much information on them so they either take up so much of the page that the print is small or it expands to 2 or more pages.
    The multi page is workable, the small print has to be edited or resourced.
    Last edited by spongeuke; 02-04-2019 at 03:49 PM.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Stormville NY
    Posts
    87

    Default

    I use both paper and a 10 inch kindle.
    The kindle is handy at a ukulele jam because you never know when a more complicated song is going to be played. When I go to a Bluegrass jam (playing mandolin & guitar), I find the tunes to be more predictable, and just bring sheets with lyrics for the tunes I'm singing....

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Twin Cities Area, Minnesota
    Posts
    1,898

    Default

    Directly related to my teaching (secondary choral), technology in music education and ukulele have become my vocational passions. I blog on both topics, and just as with "school-based" American music education, one of the easiest ways to integrate technology into music education is though the use of a tablet as music reader.

    I'm 46, so I'm in the middle of my career--but in my 23 years of teaching, I have seen interesting solutions, including the Music Pad Pro, the iPad, Android tablets, and even the relatively new Gvido (pronounced "Guido" as in Guido d'Arrezo, one of the early contributors to music literacy and notation). The Gvido is a double giant e-ink tablet that sells for $1600. I don't have one, and following the Music Pad Pro (which I did have access to in 2009-2010), I'll never buy a single use music tablet again. The tablet has be useable for more than that, and my iPad Pro (12.9", 2nd generation--not the newest) is.

    I do all of my play along videos on the iPad Pro, along with a huge percent of all my work in the classroom and otherwise.

    My reader of choice is forScore, although I'd give equal support to unrealBook and Newzik. forScore and unrealBook are PDF music readers that have musician-specific tools that other programs don't have. The creator of unrealBook, incidentally, is Hawaiian and plays in a band with Chris Kamaka.

    Newzik is growing by leaps and bounds, and can do PDFs and MusicXML. MusicXML really is the future, as it shares musical data between programs, yet allows you flexibility to change keys and so on, whereas PDFs are static. (You can scan a PDF, but that's a discussion for another time).

    My set-up of choice is an AirTurn GoStand with Manos mount for the tablet, an Ortega instrument holder on the stand, and a PageFlip Dragonfly pedal.

    I also understand that some of you run OnSong, PiaScore, Deep Dish Gigbook, or other apps. OnSong has some very specific tools, such as displaying lyrics to a projector while you see a different view on your iPad--and could be awesome for a ukulele jam.

    To those of you finding cheaper ways into music reading on a tablet, you have my support 100%. For Android (and some hybrid Chromebooks that can run Android apps) the answers are MobileSheets Pro and Orpheus.

    There are other PDF readers, but you need to make sure that they can turn left/right instead of scrolling up/down. I also think there is something special about programs that you can easily write on, as well as to make "hotspots" so you can quickly jump to another place in a score. If you have a large enough iPad, being able to see 2 pages can be important--the yellow book has a frustrating habit of putting additional verses on a second page when there seems to have been enough space to put them under the existing verses on the first page.

    Have a lot of music you want to digitize? I utilize 1 Dollar Scan for my books, where you send the company your books (or pages) and they scan 100 pages for $1. They send you a PDF, and destroy the original--and since it is your copy, for your use, you have the right to do it.
    Playing ukulele since January 2016.

    Have you participated in the thread, "How the Ukulele Found You?" If not, please consider adding your story--they are just fun to read.

    http://forum.ukuleleunderground.com/...lele-found-you

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Irvine and San Jose, CA
    Posts
    577

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Choirguy View Post
    Directly related to my teaching (secondary choral), technology in music education and ukulele have become my vocational passions. I blog on both topics, and just as with "school-based" American music education, one of the easiest ways to integrate technology into music education is though the use of a tablet as music reader.

    I'm 46, so I'm in the middle of my career--but in my 23 years of teaching, I have seen interesting solutions, including the Music Pad Pro, the iPad, Android tablets, and even the relatively new Gvido (pronounced "Guido" as in Guido d'Arrezo, one of the early contributors to music literacy and notation). The Gvido is a double giant e-ink tablet that sells for $1600. I don't have one, and following the Music Pad Pro (which I did have access to in 2009-2010), I'll never buy a single use music tablet again. The tablet has be useable for more than that, and my iPad Pro (12.9", 2nd generation--not the newest) is.

    I do all of my play along videos on the iPad Pro, along with a huge percent of all my work in the classroom and otherwise.

    My reader of choice is forScore, although I'd give equal support to unrealBook and Newzik. forScore and unrealBook are PDF music readers that have musician-specific tools that other programs don't have. The creator of unrealBook, incidentally, is Hawaiian and plays in a band with Chris Kamaka.

    Newzik is growing by leaps and bounds, and can do PDFs and MusicXML. MusicXML really is the future, as it shares musical data between programs, yet allows you flexibility to change keys and so on, whereas PDFs are static. (You can scan a PDF, but that's a discussion for another time).

    My set-up of choice is an AirTurn GoStand with Manos mount for the tablet, an Ortega instrument holder on the stand, and a PageFlip Dragonfly pedal.

    I also understand that some of you run OnSong, PiaScore, Deep Dish Gigbook, or other apps. OnSong has some very specific tools, such as displaying lyrics to a projector while you see a different view on your iPad--and could be awesome for a ukulele jam.

    To those of you finding cheaper ways into music reading on a tablet, you have my support 100%. For Android (and some hybrid Chromebooks that can run Android apps) the answers are MobileSheets Pro and Orpheus.

    There are other PDF readers, but you need to make sure that they can turn left/right instead of scrolling up/down. I also think there is something special about programs that you can easily write on, as well as to make "hotspots" so you can quickly jump to another place in a score. If you have a large enough iPad, being able to see 2 pages can be important--the yellow book has a frustrating habit of putting additional verses on a second page when there seems to have been enough space to put them under the existing verses on the first page.

    Have a lot of music you want to digitize? I utilize 1 Dollar Scan for my books, where you send the company your books (or pages) and they scan 100 pages for $1. They send you a PDF, and destroy the original--and since it is your copy, for your use, you have the right to do it.
    Nice summary, Choirguy. I agree left/right turn is better than scrolling up/down. Regarding 1 Dollar Scan, if you have them scan a book of 100 songs, would you get back 100 individual PDF files so that you can upload selected ones into ForScore?

    I too have PageFlip but haven't yet figured out how to make it show bottom half of current page and top half of the following page. Do you happen to know how?

    Luke

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Twin Cities Area, Minnesota
    Posts
    1,898

    Default

    As for the scan, if you send single sheets in a stack of 100, you'll get a large document. If you are a Mac user, it is incredibly easy to use Preview to extract a single page, or if you create an index of the scans, you could also import a searchable index.

    The half page format of forScore is turned on with the half page turn button (one of the buttons in the middle of the screen), in portrait mode only.
    Playing ukulele since January 2016.

    Have you participated in the thread, "How the Ukulele Found You?" If not, please consider adding your story--they are just fun to read.

    http://forum.ukuleleunderground.com/...lele-found-you

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Irvine and San Jose, CA
    Posts
    577

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Choirguy View Post
    As for the scan, if you send single sheets in a stack of 100, you'll get a large document. If you are a Mac user, it is incredibly easy to use Preview to extract a single page, or if you create an index of the scans, you could also import a searchable index.

    The half page format of forScore is turned on with the half page turn button (one of the buttons in the middle of the screen), in portrait mode only.
    Got it. Thanks!

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    Walla Walla, WA
    Posts
    855

    Default

    Great info, Chris, thanks. It's also easy to extract single page(s) from a PDF directly on an iPad in PDF Expert, and, I assume, numerous other apps for iOS, Android, and Windows. I often do this from the various songbooks, then shoot the renamed song to forScore so I can find it faster. I'm going to look at the other apps you mention.
    Kala KA-ASAC acacia baritone
    Tiny Tenor spruce/mahogany
    Kiwaya KTC-2 mahogany concert
    aNueNue Khaya I mahogany soprano
    Flight Travel soprano

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    1,151

    Default

    Wow, it sounds pretty expensive to have a readable, usable non-paper set up. Am I misunderstanding that?
    Pageflip looks like it's about $90, then you need a tablet large enough to read the music, a stand it works on, app(s) for the music.
    It certainly sounds handy to be able to bring a large stack of music with you on a single device, but you also have to bring all the associated gear, and spend a good chunk of money.
    Makes me feel like I'm misunderstanding something here?

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •