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Thread: CITES Appendix II good news

  1. #1
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    Default CITES Appendix II good news

    Music Industries Association, a UK-based trade body and lobbying organization, is reporting that a proposal was put forth at the Music Industry International Coalition Meeting at the winter 2019 NAMM show to exempt rosewood instruments from CITES regulatory control.

    According to MIA, the formal proposal has been nominally agreed to, but will require ratification at an upcoming CITES meeting that is being held in Sri Lanka in May.

    The passage of the proposal would have positive implications for guitar builders, after a CITES law was put into practice in January 2017 that placed restrictions on how rosewood could be traded across international borders. This resulted in some companies, including Fender and Larrivée, exploring rosewood alternatives. Additionally, Taylor halted production on certain rosewood models.

    According to MIA, the new amendment is a "recognition by the powers that be that musical instruments were (very unfortunately) ‘collateral damage’ in the rosewood restrictions that were chiefly aimed at stopping illegal logging in the furniture industry.”

    The proposal aims to: exempt finished musical instruments containing rosewood; exempt finished musical instrument parts containing rosewood; and exempt finished musical accessories containing rosewood.

  2. #2
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    That would be great. I hope the CITES group ratifies that proposal.
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  3. #3
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    This is what I have been told by USDA agents in Chicago. It's great news because we have been trying to do it legally, but the CITES certificates required are only good for 6 months and last time it took 5 months to get them (that was BEFORE the government shut down) from US Fish and Wildlife.
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  4. #4
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    I don't understand International law very well, but I hope this doesn't pass. Too many restrictions that were put in place to protect endangered species have been done away with, or carelessly trampled on.
    Sorry, but I care more about our planet than I do about having a certain kind of wood to build my ukulele with.
    "Those who bring sunshine and laughter to the lives of others cannot keep it from themselves".

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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pete Howlett View Post
    "recognition by the powers that be that musical instruments were (very unfortunately) ‘collateral damage’ in the rosewood restrictions that were chiefly aimed at stopping illegal logging in the furniture industry.”
    This what luthiers and musicians have been saying all along! I don't have figures, but I would guess that less than %1 of illegally logged rosewood goes into making musical instruments and %99+ percent goes into making clunky furniture for the Far East market.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nickie View Post
    I don't understand International law very well, but I hope this doesn't pass. Too many restrictions that were put in place to protect endangered species have been done away with, or carelessly trampled on.
    Sorry, but I care more about our planet than I do about having a certain kind of wood to build my ukulele with.
    Hard to disagree with that.
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    New Zealand.

  7. #7
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    this is just delaying the inevitable.

  8. #8
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    "According to MIA, the new amendment is a "recognition by the powers that be that musical instruments were (very unfortunately) ‘collateral damage’ in the rosewood restrictions that were chiefly aimed at stopping illegal logging in the furniture industry.”"

    While they should be applauded for trying to save rosewood, the planet and its animals, one wonders how intelligent these people are if they didn't realise the ramifications on industries other then the furniture industry prior to putting all rosewoods on CITES.

  9. #9
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    If CITES makes it more difficult to create sustainable growth, then in my opinion what's the point, creating restrictions is only part of it. I agree with Bill and Beau, the rules should be made for the future, not just the present, which is just too shortsighted. I also agree with Sequoia that musical instruments are a very small amount of the wood consumed in the word and should be exempted.


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  10. #10
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    FYI - Here's an email I received the other day from the Australian CITES Management Authority.

    Dear Stakeholder



    I am writing to provide you with information on the 18th Meeting of the Conference of the Parties (CoP18) to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), being held in Sri Lanka from 23 May-3 June 2019.



    CITES is an international treaty that aims to ensure international trade in animals and plants does not threaten the survival of the species. The listing of a species under CITES means that import and export of that species is regulated through a permitting system. It does not affect domestic trade or use. More information on CITES is included at the end of this email, and at http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiv...de/cites/cop18.



    At CoP18, countries will be voting to change the international protection for over 300 species. We have identified that proposed changes to the regulation of the following timber producing species may have implications for your business/industry:



    · Cedrela species – include in Appendix II (proposal document only available in Spanish at this time)

    · Dalbergia species, Gibourtia demeusi, Gibourtia pellegriniana, Gibourtia tessmanii – Amend existing annotation #15

    · Dalbergia sissoo – Delete from Appendix II

    · Pericopsis elata – Amend existing annotation

    · Pterocarpus tinctorius – Include in Appendix II

    · Widdringtonia whytei – include in Appendix II



    The full set of proposals to be considered at CoP18 can be found at https://cites.org/eng/cop/18/prop/index.php, with additional agenda items at https://cites.org/eng/cop/18/doc/index.php.



    The Australian Government wants to know what these changes might mean for you. We invite any comments you wish to provide on these proposals, in particular on any impacts you would anticipate on your business/industry from the proposed change in regulation.



    Information that would be particularly useful to us includes:



    · average number/volume of specimens exported and/or imported per year

    · estimated average harvest levels (for species that are harvested within Australia)

    · average number of shipments of specimens exported and/or imported per year

    · average annual revenue earned from import and/or export by your business/industry

    · trends in the import and/or export of these species

    · number of staff members involved in the export and/or import of these species.



    We are aware that some of the proposals are still in languages other than English. English translations should be uploaded to the CITES web site in coming weeks. If you are unable to provide comment by the due date because translation is not yet available, please let us know.



    Comments are due by 22 March 2019 and will help inform Australia’s negotiating positions at the Conference of the Parties meeting. Please send any comments to the Wildlife Trade and Biosecurity Branch, GPO Box, Canberra 2601 or by email to AustraliaCITESCoP18@environment.gov.au. For information on how your comments will be handled, see http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiv...de/cites/cop18.



    If you have any queries or wish to discuss CITES CoP18 issues further, please contact AustraliaCITESCoP18@environment.gov.au.



    Yours sincerely



    Australian CITES Management Authority
    All the best,
    Campbell


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